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Agricultural Safety Tips for the Rainy Season

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Farming, ranching, and other agricultural managing jobs are considered one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. This is because casualties on the farm are usually just an accident away. Rainy season comes with slippery floors and wet surfaces; add that to the mix and it makes things much more dangerous. Here are some tips to stay safe during the season:

 

1. Keep Farm Equipment Away from Rain:

Many farm equipment are made of iron and are therefore prone to rust if exposed to heavy rain. Similarly, exposing wooden equipment to rainfall could cause decay.

However, the most dangerous of them all is exposing electrical farm equipment to rain so ensure that exposed or bad wires on any equipment are fixed promptly.

Also, it may not out-rightly show that water has damaged an equipment. If you use a farm tool, with no idea that some parts have been damaged by water, the results could be disastrous. To prevent this, make sure you lock your equipment in a safe, dry place, and don’t leave them out overnight.

 

2. Make Sure Water Areas are Fenced:

If you have an open water source on your farm, ensure they’re properly protected during the rainy season.

It can be difficult to spot dams, wells, and lakes during the rainy season and one can easily fall in. Similarly, heavy rain could carry small livestock to those bodies of water.

Establish barriers around these places by locking or fencing them in order to prevent accidents when it rains.

 

3. Keep Farm Produce Away from Rain:

There’s a reason why fruits and vegetables are to be stored in a cool, dry place. This is because moisture accumulation on these farm produces could bring about microbial growth.

Fungus such as mould could grow on these farm products. Consuming these infested products or selling them could be detrimental to the health. Also, if farm produce is ready to be harvested, leaving them in water logged soil could cause negative effects.

Livestock feed should also be kept from rain as they could also be contaminated.

Also Read Interview With Sanne Steemers, A Dutch Chocolate Entrepreneur Connecting Europe And Africa

4. Be Wary of Electric Outlets:

Water and electricity are not a good mix, and definitely not on a farming ground. Perhaps you built a wired fence to keep off predators, try not to lean on those fences when it rains. Also, put a notice on electric fences so that passersby, and farm visitors take extra precautions.

Do not cut or make contact with particularly wet branches that have come in contact with electric lines as they may be conductors of electricity. You might also want to tie your farm equipment somewhere else, and not on electric poles.  Also, livestock such as cows can get electrocuted so keep them away from electric outlets and live wires.

If electric poles fall around your farm area, do not inspect it as the wires could still be live. Call the right authorities to handle it.

 

5. Take Care of your Health:

The rainy season is usually accompanied with cold, windy weather. Exposure to cold weather can increase your risk of getting infected with something detrimental to your health.

When farming during this season, especially early in the morning, dress appropriately for the weather. Rain also brings worms and muddy water so ensure to wear the proper footwear to avoid exposing your feet to harmful bacteria and sharp objects.

The rainy season also brings stagnant water which is a breeding ground for mosquitoes, the primary transmitter of malaria. Ensure that farmhouses are sprayed with insecticides and always go to the farm with mosquito nets and mosquito repellent.

Similarly, livestock diseases such as fowl pox and lumpy skin disease are common during the rainy season. Precautions such as keeping livestock feed away from rain and being mindful of where they graze should be taken.

It is easy to fall an accident victim on the farm during the rainy season but these tips will help reduce the chances of that happening. Remember, “prevention is better than cure.”

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Agriculture

Cold Logistics Academy: Perishable Export Logistics Training (PELT)

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Cold Logistics Academy, the training arm of Kennie O Cold Chain Logistics is poised to train aspiring and professionals in the cold chain and logistics industry. The Academy have a robust curriculum that spans across the relevant aspects of the profession. With seasoned facilitators, it guarantees a training experience with practicable modules and engagement.

Cold chain logistics plays a huge role in export of fruits and vegetables; whether by Air, Sea or Road. From the farm gate to the final destination.

Learn practicable skills in cold chain logistics and export from experts. Get certified in the Perishable Export Logistics Training (PELT).

The Cold Logistics Academy course has been developed to handle challenges and provide solutions in the transportation of perishables. The course content includes Cold Chain Logistics and Freight, Export documentation and planning, Insurance and claims, Packing and labeling for Export, Food safety and handling.

Who to attend

• Logistics professionals working in cold chain and related services.
• Senior and midlevel managers involved in cold chain design.
• Certification bodies.
• FMARD.
• Operations and logistics managers.
• Warehouse managers and supervisors.
• Transport managers and supervisors.
• Third-party logistics personnel looking to improve their current operations, or providing cold chain services.
• Supply Chain Managers.
• Exporters.
• Route Planning Managers.
• Cold Room and Storage Professional.
• Farmers and Agribusiness Practitioners.
• Pack house.
• Quality Assurance managers.
• Consultants.

The extensive modules includes; 

Module1. Export documentation and planning.
Module 2. Logistics and Freight (Cold Chain Logistics).
Module 3. Insurance and claims
Module 4. Packing and labeling for Export.
Module 5. Food safety and handling.

The Speakers

• Ope Olarenwaju CEO Kennie O Cold Chain Logistics.
• MudiagaOkumagba General Manager, RedStar Express PLC.
• Kinsley Kwalar CEO StilFresh.
• Adebola Akingbele Founder Msvalue food safety practices.

Date: 24th and 25th November 2020.

To register for the training, Clck here

Also Read Closing The Gender Gap: An Interview with Dream Girl Global (DGG) Founder, Precious Oladokun

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Agriculture

African Farmers Stories: Oke-Aro Pig Settlement Faces Losses From Disease

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The African Farmers’ Stories, powered by Support4AfricanSMEs, in collaboration with Business Day Nigeria, Big Dutchman, Clarke Energy and other partners brings stories from farmers in Africa so that their challenges can be understood and long-term sustainable solutions can be sought.

As we continue to tell these stories, today we highlight the situation at Oke-Aro Agege, bordering Lagos and Ogun States where African Swine Fever has ravaged the Oke-Aro pig farm settlement, resulting in the loss of billions of naira worth of pigs and investments. African Swine Fever (ASF), a highly contagious viral haemorrhagic disease of wild and domesticated pigs is a known contributor to severe economic and production loss in pig farms. It was retrospectively first identified in Kenya in 1907 and can be spread via direct or indirect contact with infected pigs but is not a health risk to humans. Unfortunately, it has no vaccine or cure and must be controlled during an outbreak with classic sanitation measures, cleansing and disinfection, zoning control, surveillance and strict biosecurity measures.

The Oke-Aro piggery estate is located in in Giwa/Oke-Aro; it occupies overs 30 hectares of land with about 5000 pens, making it the largest pig farm in West Africa. It was established about twenty years ago by the Lagos State Ministry of Agriculture but is located in Ogun State and is powered by the National Directorate of Employment. The Oke-Aro Piggery Farmers Association has about 3,000 active members with each operating their own independent piggery within the settlement. The outbreak of such a deadly disease in the settlement is indeed alarming, and an indictment on the years of neglect from poor hygiene, absence of extension officers and poor supervision.

According to the President of the Association, It is estimated that the outbreak has resulted to over two hundred and fifty thousand pigs death worth and resulted in cumulative losses worth over 4.9 billions of naira. Many farmers have lost their entire stock and the lockdown has unfortunately worsened the situation as some tried to quickly sell of their pigs to avoid total loss but could not easily access buyers due to inter-state travel restrictions.

Unfortunately, this tragedy has severely affected the farmers of Oke-Aro pig settlement, as four farmers have been confirmed dead while another thirty are currently hospitalised from shock and high blood pressure brought on by the inability to repay the millions of naira worth of loans taken out to support their farms. Most of these farmers have no insurance premiums, and many are watching their investments, some of which are backed by borrowed funds from development and commercial banks, go down the drain. They are calling for assistance to revive the sector and preserve human lives.

Also Read: Black Mamba- Changing the world one chilli at a time

The situation has not gone unnoticed, with farmers taking to social media to lament the challenges the disease has brought about. Many fear the high mortality rates and complain that pigs are being sold at drastic losses for fear of death and to avoid total loss. Fully bred pigs weighing over 70kg are in some cases selling for as low as ₦1500.Other farmers joined in to cite their losses in other areas of livestock farming with Newcastle disease that affects poultry and can also result in total loss of investment.

The Oke-Aro tragedy highlights the importance of the African Farmers’ Stories campaign – to tell the important stories to attract investors and policy makers into the agricultural sector. Indeed, the time to support the African farmer and other entrepreneurs is now, as jobs and livelihoods are being lost. There is an urgent need for investors to address areas such as the recycling sector to recycle the waste from piggeries and to contribute to value addition to the pigs, extension services to support and educate farmers, and policy makers to ensure constant supervision of the standard of hygiene within the settlement.

Article By: Victoria Madedor of Support4AfricanSMEs

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Agriculture

COVID-19 Pandemic disrupting our food supply chain – What Next?

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Vertical farming. Image credit: Josephine Favre

The COVID-19 Pandemic is challenging us. None of us saw it coming!

Everything around us is changing, from our behaviour in how we deal with the nitty gritty little things to the way on how we look at managing our businesses under Lockdown.

At this point of time, food advocates, including smallholder farmers are facing immense pressure not only on food production, but on distribution/supply due to many countries and their boarders suddenly closing.

There are some countries that are better managed than others thus can go by with their activities on a daily basis, however there are many countries still lacking the appropriate support and expertise necessary to implement sustainable, suitable and appropriate food transition during this Pandemic.

Our entire supply demand chain could so easily be redesigned or redefined due to the COVID-19 Pandemic and the associated economic disruption.

What does that mean? It means owners of food production will need to find ways to monetize their existence. These will result to immediate self-production, leading to door to door delivery of everything we need and consume to our homes.

Building a food production infrastructure which uses less land, less water, less fertilizer and puts higher value, nutritious food at the doorstep of the consumer, is undoubtedly a huge step forward for agriculture and human development.

We are at a point when the technology not only already exists but is improving at an exponential rate; the question is not when but how? How big of a role can vertical farming play in securing the availability of food for future generations while protecting the planet in the process.

Integrating sustainable food production into the urban environment and becoming climate resilient is a necessary step for a modern society. Vertical Farming offers all of this, while also serving as a tool for uplifting quality of life in densely-populated urban areas.

Vertical farming is a smart solution that will use the most advanced technologies in agriculture to provide answers to food production questions. Vertical farms are climate controlled and produce the same quality of food regardless of environmental factors like droughts, floods, pests and disease. By remaining independent of the outdoor environment, vertical farms can provide food for urban and rural areas alike that suffer from food shortage during periods of extreme weather or disease.

Vertical farming

It is more clear now that Vertical Farming is no longer just an Urban Farming solutions but a general farming solution given today’s climate changes such as heat waves, extreme floods etc. We need to be in control and Vertical Farming or CEA gives us just that, RESILIENCE.

Also Read: Sub-Saharan Africa steps up efforts to boost local food & beverage manufacturing

The African Association for Vertical Farming (AAVF) is playing a very big role to ensure that the farming community (and potential Agriprenuers) are aware of Vertical Faring as a modern way of farming that ascertain productivity despite climate change challenges, while addressing food security delivery.

We the AAVF at this point of time advice every family owning land, small or big, a balcony or a side garden to learn on how to produce, or provide for themselves and their own by using Vertical Farming Technologies as their agriculture method starting from now.

New technologies for single household to complex business projects can now easily be taught. Join us for our online Vertical Farming Trainings at: https://www.aavf.ch/copy-ofapplication-form-1

There can be no doubt that we have to act now and move toward more sustainable thinking in food practices.

We can do this together!

Article By: Josephine Favre, President The African Association for Vertical Farming

Visit: The African Association for Vertical Farming

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