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Amref Health Africa Holds 1st Regional Dialogue on the Progress of UHC in Africa

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Cairo, Egypt: The 1st Regional Dialogue on the Africa Health Agenda set a bold agenda for the Africa Health Agenda 2021 which is aligned to the key outputs from the AHAIC2019 in March 2019 shared in the Communique where more than 1, 800 participants from over 47 countries convened in Kigali Rwanda between March 3rd- 7th 2019 at the third Biennial Africa Health Agenda International Conference (AHAIC). The participants were drawn from all sectors; scientists and researchers, government leaders, parliamentarians, development partners, private sector, civil society, youth, advocates for health, media, health practitioners and community health workers.

It is in the heart of the upcoming conference’s preparations the co-organizers met with member state representatives of the African Union to discuss on possible agenda items that ought to be addressed for countries to accelerate progress towards UHC in Africa as well as frame priorities for the Africa Health Agenda Dialogues planned over the next year leading up the AHAIC2021.

“Strengthening health systems and in particular Leadership, Management and Governance; and increasing the number of adequately trained health care workers is key to deliver quality primary health care services to hasten the attainment of UHC”, said Dr. Githinji Gitahi, the Global CEO of Amref Health Africa.

During this session the proposed theme for AHAIC 2021 which is Africa Health Agenda for Country-led Actions to Advance UHC: Opportunities & Challenges was highlighted. Key on the agenda at the conference cohosted by Amref and the Ministry of Health Rwanda was sharing of experiences, achievements, knowledge and recommendations on how Africa can accelerate attainment of Universal Health Coverage (UHC). This was in line with the theme; UHC 2030 Now: Multi-sectoral Action to Achieve Universal Health Coverage in Africa.

“It is essential to engage and work closely together with the  Africa Union member state representatives, CDC Africa  among others to ensure that Africa’s health agenda is reflected and discussed during the Africa Health Agenda 2021,” added Dr. Githinji Gitahi.

The dialogues aimed at engaging key stakeholders in the health sector across the continent to help define a common African health Agenda will be held regionally in Malawi, Senegal and Ethiopia from 2019 through to 2020.

These dialogues will focus on equitable access to critical health services for vulnerable groups such as women and children, health financing, innovative financing, transparency and accountability as well as political accountability.

The Africa Health Agenda 2021 will be held between 8th and 11th of March 2020 in Kigali, Rwanda in partnership with the Ministry of Health of Rwanda.

Also Read Mentoring The Girl Child: Interview With Ebella Whajah Ellis, A Girl Child Advocate

About The Africa Health Agenda International Conference (AHAIC)

AHAIC is a biennial conference led Amref Health Africa bringing together various stakeholders in the health sector ranging from Government officials, UN leadership, Non State Actors, Civil Society and private sector leaders, community and youth representatives from across Africa and around the world to exchange ideas and generate momentum around Universal Health Coverage in Africa. For more information: https://ahaic.org

Credit: Amref

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Reducing the risk of medication related deaths in Nigeria

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‘As long as we have clinicians who hide the name of prescribed medication from their patients; the rate of duplication of therapy, adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions will continue to increase. Patients have the right to know the medicines prescribed for them’ Adaku Efuribe

As we clamour for universal health coverage and achieving the UN SDG goal3- Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages. There is one simple step we could take to help improve the health and well- being of Nigerians; we need to bridge the gap of lack of integrated healthcare and patient centred care using a multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach. We need to put the patient at the centre of care and utilise pharmacist knowledge and input if we must prescribe legally and safely.

The rate of medication related deaths due to overdose, adverse drug reaction, drug- drug interactions can be reduced through medicines reviews and medicines reconciliation.

‘As long as we have clinicians who hide the name of prescribed medication from their patients; the rate of duplication of therapy, adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions will continue to increase. Patients have the right to know the medicines prescribed for them’

Medicines reconciliation/review

Medicines reconciliation is a process whereby patients’ medicines are reconciled as they move between different stages of healthcare, from primary – secondary care interface.

Also Read: Meet Mariatheresa S. Kadushi, Founder of M-afya, A Mobile App Providing Health Information In Native Languages In Africa

Pharmacist led medication review tend to be more in-depth ,capturing all the essence of patient centred care as it offers more time for the patient to ask medicines related questions which enhances concordance.

The role of the pharmacist as a ‘drug expert’ is to complete medicines reconciliation and medication reviews especially for patients taking regular medication for long term conditions like Hypertension, Diabetes, Arthritis ,Asthma etc.

In a typical Nigerian Clinical setting (public and private), when a patient has contact with a clinician, most times, the patient does not have any interaction with a pharmacist. Integrated healthcare is a healthcare model where every member of the healthcare team contributes their own quota towards excellent healthcare delivery.

This true-life story about patient X shows the importance of medicines reconciliation:

 Patient X is a 65-year-old man living in Sokoto, with a history of Hypertension; he takes amlodipine 10mg tablets daily. Patient X travelled to Lagos for a business meeting and he suffered a hypertensive crisis, he got admitted in a hospital in Lagos, his blood pressure was adequately controlled and he was discharged with two other antihypertensives. Patient X did not go through the medicines reconciliation process with a pharmacist or another clinician, so when he got back to Sokoto, he continued to take his newly prescribed antihypertensives in addition to the one prescribed by his doctor in Sokoto.Few days later, Patient X suffered hypotension (low blood pressure) and had a fall on the stairway at home, breaking his hip, which made his condition worse.

A consultation with a pharmacist during the discharge /admission process could have prevented duplication of therapy, and patient educated/informed about which medication to stop/continue and also side effects to expect. Medication reviews are needed to highlight issues of blood monitoring, therapeutic drug monitoring for medicines that require special monitoring; like methotrexate, diuretics, digoxin etc. Annual blood tests are routinely checked because if dosage regimens are not adjusted or vital blood checks are not made, this may lead to increased harm to the patient or even death.

Education and support for patients on multiple medicines

Evidence has shown that when patients understand the side effects of the medication they take, they are more likely to comply with the dosage regimen. A lot of work needs to be done in the area of patient education and information provided through medicines use reviews. The gains of patient centred care cannot be overemphasised, all medical needs have to be tailored to the individual patient, considering their personal circumstances, other co-morbidities, and sometimes frailty comes into consideration for some elderly patients as well.

There has been a drive for more social prescribing, motivational counselling and interventions for patients who have suffered medical emergencies or patients with long term conditions. Evidence has shown that non-pharmacological interventions have a major role to play in achieving overall general health and wellbeing.

Integrated health care approach will reduce the risk of medication related deaths in Nigeria as well as enhance delivery of outcomes. Clinicians need to work together to ensure adequate measures are put in place and everyone contributes their own quota for effective healthcare delivery. Pharmacists are part of the MDT and their expertise need to be utilised more across clinical settings in Nigeria to help prevent medication related errors and deaths. The role of the pharmacist in medicines optimisation, medicines reconciliation and patient centred care cannot be overemphasized.

Article by Adaku Efuribe: A clinical pharmacist & UN SDG Advocate, Adaku advocates for better healthcare systems. She is also a health and wellbeing coach.

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Providing Affordable Healthcare in Nigeria Should Be Everyone’s Business

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Adaku Efuribe

“It is my greatest desire that we improve the healthcare system in Nigeria and provide affordable healthcare for local communities at the grassroots so that people can have access to the care they need, when they need it, in ways that are user-friendly” –  Adaku Efuribe

The 74th UN General Assembly took place in New York last September; high level meetings were held and Universal Health Coverage (UHC) was a hot topic for the week. As expected, Nigeria had a delegation of Government representatives, NGO’s and individual advocates who are working towards achieving SDG3 and UHC in attendance. So how do we implement new policies and what are the key drivers to providing UHC for all in Nigeria?

As an advocate for UHC/SDGs, I have been lending my voice over the years calling the Nigerian Government to action towards implementing UN SDGs agenda and achieving UHC.I have studied and participated in primary healthcare provision in developed economies and can say for sure healthcare provision is very expensive, but I believe we can up our game towards providing primary health care for everyone at the point of need.

Some developed economies have used the tax system to ensure their national health service does not run out of funds, a percentage of all earnings is taxed and put aside in a ‘pot’ to supplement the health budget. From a lay man’s point of view, just like the banking system, we all bank our money at different times and we withdraw money at different times, so for a contributory  healthcare system, everyone will not fall sick at the same time, some will experience life threatening sickness at some point in their life, some would have long term conditions like CVDs, Diabetes, etc., while others would only go through emergencies or minor ailments/major diseases.

In Nigeria for instance, we have a few HMO schemes covering the organised private and public sector. The ‘common man’ on the street does not have any sort of health insurance whatsoever, which leaves them at the mercy of chance. In an unfortunate event of serious illness like cancer or organ failure, they find themselves in a situation where they cannot pay for medical services hence resorting to luck to stay alive. A lot of unavoidable deaths have occurred due to lack of funds to pay for medical treatment.

The public primary care providers are underfunded and the issue of corruption has eaten deep into the fabric of the healthcare system where funds allocated for medical equipment’s, pharmaceuticals etc. are diverted for personal use.

What plans does the present Government in Nigeria have to provide Universal Health Coverage and in so doing, contribute to the economic growth of the Country?

Sustainability can be defined as meeting the needs of today without compromising the needs of tomorrow.

‘As articulated in SDG 3, health is crucial for sustainable human development, both as an inalienable human right and an essential contributor to the economic growth of society. Health contributes to national development through productive employment, reduced expenditure on illness care and greater social cohesion.

We believe that universal health coverage (UHC), delivered through an adequately-resourced and well-governed health system, will be capable of addressing these and other health challenges. Universal health coverage must ensure equitable access to affordable, accountable, appropriate health services of assured quality to all people.

These must include promotive, preventive, curative, palliative and rehabilitative services. UHC must be supported by policies and services addressing the wider social and environmental determinants of health for individuals and populations’. Sustainable Developments solutions network

Key words for providing health systems that works!

  • Well Governed Systems- Are there systems and policies in place that can be retained and continued
  • Promotive- Do we have health promotion strategies in place to promote good health and wellbeing
  • Preventative- Are we taking preventative measures seriously, screening, vaccination, reducing CVD risk through lifestyle management?
  • Curative- When we fall ill or in times of emergency, do we have access to affordable healthcare, or does sickness lead to poverty?
  • Palliative and rehabilitative services- For terminally ill patients, do we have plans for social prescribing and support? For people engaged in substance misuse, do we have plans for treatment, rehabilitation and integration back into the society

WHO uses 16 essential health services in 4 categories as indicators of the level and equity of coverage in countries: Where does Nigeria rank in the indicators?

Reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health:

  • Family planning
  • Antenatal and delivery care
  • Full child immunization
  • Health-seeking behaviour for pneumonia

Infectious diseases:

  • Tuberculosis treatment
  • HIV antiretroviral treatment
  • Hepatitis treatment
  • Use of insecticide-treated bed nets for malaria prevention
  • Adequate sanitation.

Noncommunicable diseases:

  • Prevention and treatment of raised blood pressure
  • Prevention and treatment of raised blood glucose
  • Cervical cancer screening
  • Tobacco (non-)smoking.

Service capacity and access:

  • Basic hospital access
  • Health worker density
  • Access to essential medicines
  • Health security: compliance with the International Health Regulations.

Also Read: Meet Mariatheresa S. Kadushi, Founder of M-afya, A Mobile App Providing Health Information In Native Languages In Africa

The Nigerian Government can do more to improve health outcomes and tackle poverty, by increasing coverage of health services, and by reducing the impoverishment associated with payment for health services. We can subsidise the payment for health services and provide emergency health care at the point of need by ensuring we are constantly reviewing our health policies and implementing proven international strategies. The Health budget does not in any way reflect the health needs of Nigerians, this needs to be reviewed.

As Individuals, if we take health promotion seriously, and change our lifestyle habits, then we can make changes that would reduce the cost of health as well.

Adaku Efuribe is an SDGs/UHC Advocate & Clinical Pharmacist with expertise in medicines management, integrated healthcare and health promotion.

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GE Healthcare Launches Versana Ultrasound Machines to Drive Access to Affordable and Quality Healthcare in Uganda

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GE Healthcare team displaying the Versana Premier and Versana Essential Ultrasound machines during the Uganda Society for Advancement of Radiology and Imaging Conference (USOFARI).

This innovative system is well suited for general practice clinics, physical check-up centers, community health clinics, and other facilities offering basic medical care

KAMPALA, Uganda, November 11, 2019- GE Healthcare has announced the launch of Versana Premier and Versana Essential for the first time in Uganda. The launch was announced during the Uganda Society for Advancement of Radiology and Imaging Conference (USOFARI).

Versana Premier is a world-class ultrasound designed for peace of mind, easy to use and easy to own. The Versana Premier ultrasound system can help deliver high-quality, personalized care, patient after patient, day after busy day. This innovative system is well suited for general practice clinics, physical check-up centers, community health clinics, and other facilities offering basic medical care. It also comes with local product and clinical training to help healthcare professionals gain comfort and proficiency with the system to enhance patient care.

Versana Essential is a complete ultrasound solution that healthcare professionals can learn to use quickly and productively. It enables confident clinical decision making for quick referrals and immediate clinical correlation to help scan a wide range of patients. The machine is designed with the growing medical center in mind, to provide the clinical capability and support they want without compromising the quality, reliability, and affordability needed.

Both Versana Premier and Versana Essential are part of the Versana ultrasound family, which comprises of solutions that help to empower care without compromise, balancing capability, affordability, and reliability. These innovative systems found within the GE Healthcare Primary Care Ultrasound Segment are well suited for general practice clinics, physical check-up centers, community health clinics, and other facilities offering basic medical care.

“We are excited to participate in this year’s USOFARI conference together with other private and public partners in an effort to continue providing the latest imaging solutions to enhance early detection of diseases and ultimately the most appropriate treatment for patients,” said Andrew Waititu, General Manager, GE Healthcare East Africa. “The launch of Versana Premier and Versana Essential is a testament of our continuous investment in innovations that help to drive access to affordable and quality healthcare for all across Uganda.”

Also Read Meet Mariatheresa S. Kadushi, Founder of M-afya, A Mobile App Providing Health Information In Native Languages In Africa

Universal Health Coverage (UHC) is part of the United Nations sustainable development goals, to ensure that every person, everywhere, should have access to quality healthcare. As part of its vision 2040 and the health sector development plan, Uganda seeks to accelerate movement towards UHC with among others, essential health and related services needed for promotion of a healthy and productive life. 

GE Healthcare

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