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9 Reasons Why Entrepreneurs Are Different | Amira Kamel

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“Think like an entrepreneur.”

You’ve probably come across this sentence before, and maybe heard people relating it to successful business leaders like Walt Disney, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and others.

Entrepreneurship has become a new business skill that people are striving to learn. So, let’s get closer to the “Entrepreneur” world.

“Entrepreneur” Origin, Meaning, and Pronunciation

“Entrepreneur” is a French word coined by the economist Jean-Baptiste Say, and it originates from a French verb “entreprendre”, meaning “to do something” or “to undertake”.

The noun form “entrepreneur” refers to someone who undertakes a business venture.

Since it’s a French word, it has a special pronunciation that a considerable number of people are not following. According to Oxford Dictionaries, the word “Entrepreneur” is pronounced as follows:

I’ve been thinking lately regarding what best describes entrepreneurs and their way of thinking, and I finally came up with my own acronym of the word “entrepreneur”, which is:

ENTREPRENEUR = Enterprising Native Trailblazer Resolving Endless Problems Resilient Empowered Noble Engaged Unique Risk-taker

Let’s get closer to each word included in my acronym to understand how really an entrepreneur thinks.

Entrepreneur Acronym: 9 Reasons why entrepreneurs are different

1. Enterprising

Entrepreneurs are enterprising persons who see the problems, and strive for the solutions. They are passionate, energetic, creative, innovative, courageous, self-confident, determined, and committed leaders. They are excellent communicators and understand how to effectively use their networks.

2. Native Trailblazer

Similar to a native speaker, a native trailblazer is the first original innovator who came up with an idea.

Entrepreneurs are pioneers. They always come up with new ideas and innovative solutions.

3. Resolving Endless Problems

There are endless problems in our world, and entrepreneurs master the art of problem solving. They identify and analyze the problems, then focus on the solutions.

4. Resilient

Entrepreneurs face big challenges similar to fundraising, teambuilding, being visionary, adapting to changes, risk-management, decision-making, and others.

Unless they are resilient and totally aware of change management, they will never overcome obstacles or recover from sudden changes, and their ideas will never see the light.

5. Empowered

An empowered person is someone who has this power of identifying their strengths and aren’t afraid to embrace them.

Entrepreneurs are empowered since they are in control of their life, aware of their capabilities, and ready to take real steps towards fulfilling their dreams. They are driven by the power of passion and purpose.

6. Noble

Entrepreneurs have noble reasons to start their businesses. They want a better world for them and for other people around. They care to solve problems, and dare to present their ideas, taking steps towards solutions.

7. Engaged

That’s what entrepreneurs continuously do. They are completely absorbed and engaged in learning and performing heavy-duty tasks from the idea stage to the launch stage.

8. Unique

Entrepreneurs have unique mentalities. They think and act differently, believing in themselves, driven by passion and purpose, accepting challenges, learning from mistakes, not easily giving up, working hard, striving for change, communicating and presenting effectively.

9. Risk-taker

Entrepreneurs dare to take risks. They work out of their comfort zones. Some of them quitted their very stable jobs to start their own businesses. Further risks are trusting partners and teams, sacrificing cash, vacations and health, overestimating the market demand, and many others.

Next time you hear “Think like an entrepreneur”, remember my humble acronym and the 9 reasons.

Respect to all entrepreneurs striving to see a better tomorrow.

#entrepreneur #entrepreneurship #thinking #startup #business #work #amirakamel

Resources:

– Oxford Dictionaries 

– Forbes, Entrepreneur, Entrepreneurmag Investopedia, Inc, Bussiness2Community, Foundr, HuffPost, Steven Patze, Success, The Balance Careers and Dice Articles

– University of Birmingham Courses

– Oxford University

Author:

Amira Kamel

Business Mentor, FasterCapital

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Afripreneur

Meet Mariatheresa S. Kadushi, Founder of M-afya, A Mobile App Providing Health Information In Native Languages In Africa

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Mariatheresa Samson Kadushi is a Tanzanian innovator working to disrupt the public health sector in Africa. She is founder of Mobile afya (M-afya), a “Mobile encyclopedia for public health in Africa” that provide basic health information on-demand as well as personal wellbeing education to parents and youth, with a focus on young women. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, she shares insights on the gap the her Mobile App is filling, the challenges faced by the startup, her plans for its future, and the development of the e-Health ecosystem in Africa. Excerpt.

Alaba: Kindly tell us about M-afya and the gap its filling?

Mariatheresa: Mobile afya (M-afya) is the first USSD application in Africa using internet-free mobile technology to provide basic health information in local and native languages starting with Swahili in Tanzania, East Africa. stands for mobile and Afya means health in Swahili — the most spoken language in Africa.

THE GAP: Digital divide in Africa resulting in health information gap.

For decades there has been a gap between demographics and regions that have access to modern information and communications technology and those that don’t or have only restricted access. It can include services like telephone, television, personal computers and the Internet. Majorly affecting developing countries, this digital divide prevents distribution of essential information and knowledge to those who need it the most.

Health information gap in Tanzania — Radio is the main source of information and news in Tanzanian homes, but only 5% of all broadcasted content is health-related and yet listeners do not have influence or choice of which topics to be covered.

​Internet fails to be an efficient source of information because only 30% of Tanzanians can actively access the web; and in addition, most of the content online is in English, a language spoken by only a minority group of Tanzanians.

This gap results in unnecessary suffering and deaths from easily preventable diseases and health conditions; also it continues family cycles of poverty due to lack of access to information on family planning, resulting in large numbers of unplanned children and high levels of child/teen pregnancy as well as many other negative side effects.

Mobile afya (M-afya) is tackling this problem by making health and wellbeing information accessible.

Alaba: What is the inspiration behind this brand?

Mariatheresa: My work and study with children in poverty / homeless children which led me to discover the gap of information in “Sexual and reproductive health” leading to families having more children than they can take care of, the findings encouraged me to do further research where a bigger gap was then discovered. What keeps us going is the fact that we have the ability to influence informed decisions on health and wellbeing of Africans resulting to life saving impacts.

Alaba: What was your startup capital and how were you able to raise it?

Mariatheresa: Our startup is still in seed funding level. We have been able to raise the funds first and foremost from ourselves (the founding team), after we got support from family and friends. We have done our best to bootstrap for as long as possible and now we are working to secure our first investment round with interested partners from Germany and the United States.

Alaba: What are the challenges, competitions and how are you overcoming them?

Mariatheresa: We have limited competition as we are looking to be first in market with offline USSD application – existing solutions operate online. We believe we will face competition in the near future thus our efforts in preparing competitive strategies to ensure larger market share. Utilizing user data is key in giving us first hand advantage in this strategizing effort.

As a startup the biggest challenges has been working with limited resources but also the long journey of product validation and creating a user centered product which was our main priority.

As a founder I faced challenges in creating structures to support our growing operations but with the advice of experienced mentors I managed to work my way around it. The second challenge was onboarding the right people in the team which involved putting in work to identify what exactly is needed and who is the best fit. l needed people who believed in my vision more than they care for the paycheck as I didn’t have much money to give them anyway, through it all I relied a lot on my gut, how I feel deep in my stomach when I sat next to either a new team member, potential partner, mentor or investor.

Alaba: What’s the future for your brand and what steps are you taking
towards achieving them?

Mariatheresa: Expansion — scale to other countries in sub-Saharan Africa where we have more than 100 million potential users starting with Kenya, Uganda and Congo. In 3 years we are looking at expansion and presence in 5 African countries and in 5 different national languages.

Scaling to web platform and Android and iOS apps, to allow smartphone users to still access our services.

Creating substantial “DATA” to support policy makers, decision makers, influence the education system and build smart digital health products for Africa’s fastest growing tech marketplace

First step we are taking is to finalize our round of funding which will allow us to grow our team and develop more content to scale to other parts of Africa.

Alaba: What’s your view on the development of the e-health ecosystem in Africa?

Mariatheresa: We have seen major developments in healthcare and emergency support. For example my country Tanzania has a “digital health investment road map 2017–2023″ with one of the biggest components being to computerize
primary health care including digitisation of patient records. This allows easier data storage, accessibility of records by other medical departments, referral process leading to better patient care.

Also the nation’s medicine and medical equipment stock “Medical Store Department (MSD)” launched electronic logistics management information system (eLMIS) where drugs and other medical supplies all over the country can be ordered online by hospitals and health centers.

Along these national level initiatives there are hundreds of solutions feeding in to the e-health ecosystem for example MomConnect from South Africa and Wazazi Nipendeni from Tanzania both providing maternal health information to subscribers using free text messages. SMS for life working to eliminate stock out of essential medications in Kenya, Ghana, DRC, Cameroon etc. Zipline using drone technology to deliver blood supply in Rwanda. mPedigree a company working to fight counterfeit medications by checking their authenticity in Ghana and Nigeria and many, many more solutions and services with digital components.

On A Research Project

Still within the African e-health ecosystem there is a large gap in public health especially with access to information focusing on preventive measures. Few stakeholders are working in the area and that’s where we come in with our startup.

Alaba: How do you feel as an African entrepreneur?

Mariatheresa: Working on Mobile afya (M-afya) for nearly three years has been the most difficult experience of my professional life, yet I feel that I’m making a difference, that the work we do is important and necessary. As I’m working on a cause I’m entirely passionate about, I mostly feel fulfilled but now and then I also feel exhausted as it takes a strong will, focus, organisation skills and consistency to keep up with my work’s demanding schedule.

Alaba: What is your advice to aspiring entrepreneurs and investors?

Mariatheresa: To entrepreneur– Persistence is key — the percentage of startups and businesses that fail is very high, this is because not all ideas are good, and not all ideas have a market / not all ideas come when the time is right for them. In general the entrepreneurial journey is challenging, it will require and take everything you have. There will be times when giving up might feel like the most convenient option; if you are not sure, if you are not ready to give it all – then don’t waste your time.

To investors: Foster diversity, equality and fund grassroot solutions that seek to generate new areas of impact. Apply the “think global, act local mentality”for ideas, services and products formed naturally based on problems or needs of certain regions and countries. Also promote diversity around technologies — it doesn’t always have to be high tech and mainstream — give a chance to low and mid tech companies with viable business modes.

Alaba: How do you relax and what books do you read?

MariatheresaRelax : Meditate, travel and taking time off to nature, mountains are my favorite to go place.
Books: Currently reading Becoming by Michele Obama and Wild by Cheryl Strayed

Alaba: Teach us one word in your local language. What is your favourite local dish and holiday spot within Africa?

MariatheresaOne word: “Asante” — thank you

Local dish: “Rice and Fish — Wali na samaki”

Holiday spot: Zanzibar

Also Read: Interview With Oyetola Oduyemi On The END Fund, Impact Philanthropy And Sustainability in Africa

B I O G R A P H Y

Mariatheresa Samson Kadushi is a Tanzanian innovator working to disrupt the public health sector in Africa, she has founded Mobile afya (M-afya), a mobile application developed by medical professionals, doctors, engineers and technology enthusiasts to provide health information in native and local languages in Africa.

She is passionate about disruptive solutions, human centered approaches and public health with a goal of impacting well being of Africans using technology as a transformative medium.

Mariatheresa is a recipient of IVLP — A state fellowship for emerging African leaders under US Department of State. Her alma mater is Kampala International University — ICT (Information, Communications & technology)college. She is also a YALI (Young African Leaders Initiative) alumni.

She is currently utilizing her experiences and skill sets at Moin world Hamburg while exploring partnerships, investment opportunities and potential synergies for her startup.

Visit: Mobile afya (M-afya)

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Interview With Deborah Ogwuche, Founder Of Food Channel Africa

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Deborah Ogwuche is a published author, food blogger, healthy food advocate and the Founder of Food Channel Africa. She is interested in bringing awareness to healthy traditional diets that have been time- proven and tested to benefit humans. In this interview with  Alaba Ayinuola, Deborah shares insights on what inspired her to launch Food Channel Africa, her entrepreneurship journey and how she is promoting African cuisine.  Excerpt.

Alaba: Kindly tell us about Food Channel Africa and the gap it’s filling?

Deborah: Africa is blessed with so many natural resources with a diverse and vibrant young population. As its population is dynamic so also is it’s varied nutritious traditional cuisines which is part of our heritage. Food channel Africa TV is a 24-hour food television channel that will showcase traditional cuisines from all over Nigeria and Africa.

Alaba: What was your start-up capital and how were you able to raise it?

Deborah: Up till this point, we have self-funded the venture. It’s quite challenging because when you have a project this big especially being the first of its kind, there is the usual reluctance but we are dogged in our vision to promote our rich nutrition culture and food to the world. Therefore, we believe that adequate funding to actualise the vision is only a matter of time.

Alaba: What are the challenges, competition and how are you overcoming them?

Deborah: The business landscape in Nigeria has experienced growth in the last few years but is still developing and asa woman, a wife and a mum, it’s certainly challenging trying to balance the roles. It is not easy but it is possible!

Growing up I have always done what people said I couldn’t do or shouldn’t do. For instance, my baby was just 7 months old when I founded Food Channel Africa. I faced a lot of doubt and guilt about caring for my baby and trying to build this vison but thankfully I had a solid support system from my family.

 Also, as a published author and a food blogger, I know that when you start something big like building the first 24-hour television dedicated to food, tourism and culture there are bound to be bottle- necks. What I did first is build capacity in my area of endeavour, put together a dynamic team who understand the vision and get to work. Therefore, my team and I do not see problems as obstacles but as opportunity for learning. And lastly, I never ever give up.

Alaba: Can you tell us more about your entrepreneurship journey and the learning curves?

Deborah: To be honest I thought writing would be my profession which it was for 4 years as a copywriter and published author. But what I also loved being an entrepreneur. While growing up, my parents and people around me were career professionals so I had no one to model after in terms entrepreneurship.

In spite of that, my entrepreneurial journey started at 17 years old when a friend and I bought a popcorn machine and sold popcorn to people on the streets. That was a learning curve for me because as a young girl, I could see how for instance power supply could help businesses thrive. We roasted the popcorns on generators but every profit we made went into fueling the popcorn machine.

Later in the year I got admission into the university and had to pack up the business but the lessons from that time stayed with me.And the lesson was, without proper infrastructure, businesses will continue to struggle. I have since embarked on more than 5 different businesses up till date.

Alaba: What’s the inspiration behind Food Channel Africa and how are you funding it?

Deborah: Food channel Africa came to be out of a mixture of frustration and passion. Frustration and passion because, we were losing our traditional diet history with our diet becoming increasingly unhealthy. No one was paying attention to the fact that Africa wasn’t just rich in its vast natural resources but also in its delicious, healthy and diverse cuisines. I read extensively about the French diet and so many diets from different regions of the world.

My recent travel to France only cemented the fact that African cuisine is one of the world’s healthiest cuisine and needs to be well- represented on the world’s stage. That’s our mission at Food Channel Africa.This is why we are actively seeking for investment to actualise this great vision.

Alaba: How are you promoting our African foods and culture?

Deborah: Food channel Africa is a 24-hour food television channel solely dedicated to promoting African cuisine, culture and tourism. We are developing programs that will not only showcase different traditional meals and how they prepared but also show the deep and rich culture of different African locality, the history behind some of the popular cuisines and the people’s cultural heritage. Food Channel Africa will be informative, educative and entertaining.

It will also boost the food industry in Africa and encourage the youth to pursue culinary education as a career. We would make Michelin stars out of cooks and chefs, people who will in turn take Africa to the world.

Alaba: How do you feel as an African entrepreneur?

Deborah: I feel blessed being an African entrepreneur in this time because of a lot of opportunities opened up to entrepreneurs in the continent. The government and other organization’s drive to open up opportunities to African entrepreneurs especially women in terms of investment is commendable. However, I feel foreign investment shouldn’t be too restrictive to only fin-tech and online ventures.

The food industry and media industry are at a pivotal point as regards development in Nigeria and investors should be encouraged to invest in these areas because of the abounding opportunities and growth in that sector. The media industry is also seeing a lot of development because recently Nigeria converted from the analogue model to digital freeing up a lot of white space for content producers like Food Channel Africa.

Alaba: How can government best support entrepreneurs in Africa?

Deborah: The government’s economic initiatives aimed at empowering entrepreneurs is commendable but more work needs to be done. Incentives and legislation that encourages foreign investments and improve access to credit and loan facilities should be enacted. The government should provide infrastructure and economic enablers like tax incentives for small and medium scale enterprises. A safe and working society is also vital in ensuring business growth and development.

Alaba: What’s your advice for aspiring entrepreneurs and investors in Africa?

Deborah: My advice for aspiring entrepreneurs in Africa is invest in yourself by building capacity in your chosen endeavour. Don’t use short-cuts or fall into the trap of making money quickly. Do your due diligence and don’t lose focus. If you bring a product in to the market for example, stick to the standard or improve don’t cut corner because you want more turn-overs. Integrity in business is priceless and rewarding so have integrity. Don’t settle for less and keep innovating!

My advice to investors is the best time to invest in African businesses is now. Don’t be left out!

Alaba: What inspires you and keeps you going?

Deborah: I believe true success is not how many material wealth you acquire but the number of people you impacted. What keeps me going is knowing that I am directly impacting so many lives and building a legacy that is bigger than me and would outlive me.

Alaba: How do you relax and what books do you read?

Deborah: I relax by reading. I love reading about history and biographies of great men and women. Give me a nice chilled (natural) drink, a snack and a good book and I’m as good as new. Cooking also helps me relax and is therapeutic for me.

Also Read: Meet Sivi Malukisa, The Congolese Entrepreneur Whose Food Startup Is Promoting DRC Cuisine

B I O G R A P H Y

Deborah Ogwuche is the creative director and founder of Food Channel Africa, a 24-hour television channel dedicated to showcasing African cuisines. She is a published author, a food blogger and a healthy food advocate.

Email: [email protected]

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How this student entrepreneur is bridging the gap between law study and the labour market

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Cheeka M. Onyeka is a student entrepreneur, the CEO and founder of Cosmo legal Africa based in Enugu, Nigeria. A virtual career development hub for law students and with a global outreach that equip law students with industry information by bridging the gap between an average law student and career opportunities. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, he shared is passion for the study of law, why he founded Cosmo Legal Africa and his entrepreneurship journey. Excerpt.

 

Alaba: Can you tell us about Cosmos Legal and the gap its filling?

Cheeka: Cosmo Legal Africa largely leverage on technology to make the study of law easier and credible in Africa. As a virtual firm we equip law students with industry trends, career opportunities and a first hand insight into emerging areas of law like sports law,space Law, fintech etc.

 

Alaba: What’s the inspiration behind setting up this startup?

Cheeka: l feel glad to speak on this, l birthed Cosmo legal Africa (CLA) out of my passion for the study of law. I came with CLA to bridge the gap between Law study and the labour market. If we are to embrace the truth. Simply acquiring an LLB is not the key to wealth. Various faculties of law churns out thousand of law graduates every year but then you find out that most of them are not employable or cannot maneuver their way through the labour market. This is because they are at sea with the realities of the labour market. CLA is here to bridge that gap!

 

Alaba: How do you fund your startup?

Cheeka: Fund has been a big issue for my team and I. But I have the firm belief that as days goes by we will surmount that.

 

Alaba: What are the challenges, competition and how are you overcoming them?

Cheeka: The world is changing. How we live. Interact. This is as result of technology. I have equally accepted the fact that my role as an individual is increasing and the only option available is to subscribe to the trends. The key challenge we are encountering at CLA is lack of commitment from our Associates and then having people underestimate your vision.

 

Alaba: As a student, how are you running this startup effectively?

Cheeka: Well, it has not been easy. But I always try my best at maintaining a good time management schedule.

 

Alaba: How are you supporting law students in line with their career path?

Cheeka: I have been able to connect with colleagues from other schools in Nigeria and Ghana . We also have campus Ambassadors in various schools. They mobilize students for our monthly webinars and career sessions.

 

Alaba: How does your firm measure its impact?

Cheeka: Since we just started out not quite long. We intend to carry out feedback survey from time to time through the use of google forms and any other available means. We would also be asking for immediate feedbacks from participants of our Webinars and also from our beneficiaries in the future.

 

Alaba: What’s the future for Cosmo Legal and what steps are you taking in achieving them?

Cheeka: In the long run, l hope to align with reputable law firms in Africa, Government agencies and key players in the labour market to fully adapt the legal profession to this changing times. Because to really adapt the legal profession to the best standard. The grassroots must be involved and that grassroots are law students.

 

Alaba: How do you feel as an Africa student entrepreneur?

Cheeka: It has been tough. However it has given me the opportunity to work in a team space. I find it worthwhile working with my Co-Founders Imonikhe Wilson and Akinwade Zainab.  Emmanuel ikedinobi and oforbuike who are my course mates and also Associates at CLA have always pushed me to be best l can. Nevertheless, setting up CLA has made me realize that whatever beautiful ideas we have, can not be fully appreciated until we take steps to actualize them.

 

Alaba: How do you relax and what books do you read?

Cheeka: I love the digital space. It has given me the opportunity to be aware. To know more. I enjoy the works of John Grisham, Yuval Noah , Shakespeare and Joel osteen.

Also Read: Cycles, Nigeria’s No.1 Bike-Sharing Platform Achieving The United Nations SDG Goal 11 – Damilola Soladoye

 

B I O G R A P H Y:

Cheeka M. Onyeka is the CEO and founder of Cosmo legal Africa. He is an intern of Justistia chambers Unizik. Calm and possesses a ‘lawyerly’ composure. He exudes a witty exuberance that can only come from consistent study of the law.He has a unique skill in both writing and oral advocacy and is an excellent team player with eye for details. He is innovative and strongly dedicated to demanding duties.  He has keen interest in corporate and commercial law, and the role it plays in modern day transactions.

He has worked as an executive member of the law students electoral commission Unizik from 2017-2018. He serves as the Chief bailiff of the Students’ union Government Unizik. Also, he is currently the public relation officer of the International law students Association, Unizik and an aspiring contestant of the Phillip Jessup international moot court competition in Washington DC.

Cheeka M. Onyeka is also law tutor under the academic board of Christian law students fellowship of Nigeria.

 
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