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Farming, the biggest job on earth

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The estimation that world population will reach 9 billion by 2050 has sent food experts to the drawing board with a warning that current production methods are not campatible with the required high farm productivity. With this in mind, chemical company, BASF has launched a new campaign with the aim to celebrate farmers globally and support agriculture to enable increased production of enough food to feed the world.

Dubbed Farming, the biggest job on earth, the campaign seeks to assist farmers in accessing the latest farming innovations, ensuring soil remains healthy and connecting farmers to high quality, fast maturing drought tolerant seed varieties.

Population grows, land does not. The only way we can ensure that a parcel of land can continue feeding more mouths is to make it more productive through innovation.

“In 1960 the total agricultural areas was 4,300 meter square per head, in 2005 it shrunk to 2,200 and by 2030 this will shrink further to 1,800. This means that the same parcel of land, has been feeding more people. Population grows, land does not. The only way we can ensure that a parcel of land can continue feeding more mouths is to make it more productive through innovation,” said Gift Mbaya, sub hub manager – Crop Protection and Public Health at BASF East Africa Ltd during the National Farmer’s Awards 2016.

Making every seed count

At BASF we create chemistry to equip farmers with the skills needed to improve productivity. It is for this reason that we see Farming as the biggest job on earth because our lives begin with eating. The person who produces the food, the most basic of human needs has the biggest job to do. The future for all of us is in the farmers’ hands. Making every seed count,” Mbaya added.

The campaign is timely especially in Kenya, coming at a time when recent reports have indicated that the country is struggling to feed its population. According to a Global Hunger Index by the International Food Policy Research Institute, Kenya is among 50 countries where levels of hunger remain serious or alarming, with one in every five Kenyans being undernourished and one in four children being stunted, putting the country marginally ahead of conflict-prone Iraq.

“BASF is working with farmers to keep the soil fertile and fruitful with the right amounts of water and nutrients. Stewarding the land and planning for the future” reiterated Mbaya.

Without technology, food production becomes a herculean task, explaining why BASF is supporting farmers to access innovation, solutions and experts to enable them to improve productivity, increase efficiency, and stay at the cutting edge of their profession to ensure growing demands are met, year after year.

Source: bizcommunity.com

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Agriculture

Cold Logistics Academy: Perishable Export Logistics Training (PELT)

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Cold Logistics Academy, the training arm of Kennie O Cold Chain Logistics is poised to train aspiring and professionals in the cold chain and logistics industry. The Academy have a robust curriculum that spans across the relevant aspects of the profession. With seasoned facilitators, it guarantees a training experience with practicable modules and engagement.

Cold chain logistics plays a huge role in export of fruits and vegetables; whether by Air, Sea or Road. From the farm gate to the final destination.

Learn practicable skills in cold chain logistics and export from experts. Get certified in the Perishable Export Logistics Training (PELT).

The Cold Logistics Academy course has been developed to handle challenges and provide solutions in the transportation of perishables. The course content includes Cold Chain Logistics and Freight, Export documentation and planning, Insurance and claims, Packing and labeling for Export, Food safety and handling.

Who to attend

• Logistics professionals working in cold chain and related services.
• Senior and midlevel managers involved in cold chain design.
• Certification bodies.
• FMARD.
• Operations and logistics managers.
• Warehouse managers and supervisors.
• Transport managers and supervisors.
• Third-party logistics personnel looking to improve their current operations, or providing cold chain services.
• Supply Chain Managers.
• Exporters.
• Route Planning Managers.
• Cold Room and Storage Professional.
• Farmers and Agribusiness Practitioners.
• Pack house.
• Quality Assurance managers.
• Consultants.

The extensive modules includes; 

Module1. Export documentation and planning.
Module 2. Logistics and Freight (Cold Chain Logistics).
Module 3. Insurance and claims
Module 4. Packing and labeling for Export.
Module 5. Food safety and handling.

The Speakers

• Ope Olarenwaju CEO Kennie O Cold Chain Logistics.
• MudiagaOkumagba General Manager, RedStar Express PLC.
• Kinsley Kwalar CEO StilFresh.
• Adebola Akingbele Founder Msvalue food safety practices.

Date: 24th and 25th November 2020.

To register for the training, Clck here

Also Read Closing The Gender Gap: An Interview with Dream Girl Global (DGG) Founder, Precious Oladokun

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Agriculture

African Farmers Stories: Oke-Aro Pig Settlement Faces Losses From Disease

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The African Farmers’ Stories, powered by Support4AfricanSMEs, in collaboration with Business Day Nigeria, Big Dutchman, Clarke Energy and other partners brings stories from farmers in Africa so that their challenges can be understood and long-term sustainable solutions can be sought.

As we continue to tell these stories, today we highlight the situation at Oke-Aro Agege, bordering Lagos and Ogun States where African Swine Fever has ravaged the Oke-Aro pig farm settlement, resulting in the loss of billions of naira worth of pigs and investments. African Swine Fever (ASF), a highly contagious viral haemorrhagic disease of wild and domesticated pigs is a known contributor to severe economic and production loss in pig farms. It was retrospectively first identified in Kenya in 1907 and can be spread via direct or indirect contact with infected pigs but is not a health risk to humans. Unfortunately, it has no vaccine or cure and must be controlled during an outbreak with classic sanitation measures, cleansing and disinfection, zoning control, surveillance and strict biosecurity measures.

The Oke-Aro piggery estate is located in in Giwa/Oke-Aro; it occupies overs 30 hectares of land with about 5000 pens, making it the largest pig farm in West Africa. It was established about twenty years ago by the Lagos State Ministry of Agriculture but is located in Ogun State and is powered by the National Directorate of Employment. The Oke-Aro Piggery Farmers Association has about 3,000 active members with each operating their own independent piggery within the settlement. The outbreak of such a deadly disease in the settlement is indeed alarming, and an indictment on the years of neglect from poor hygiene, absence of extension officers and poor supervision.

According to the President of the Association, It is estimated that the outbreak has resulted to over two hundred and fifty thousand pigs death worth and resulted in cumulative losses worth over 4.9 billions of naira. Many farmers have lost their entire stock and the lockdown has unfortunately worsened the situation as some tried to quickly sell of their pigs to avoid total loss but could not easily access buyers due to inter-state travel restrictions.

Unfortunately, this tragedy has severely affected the farmers of Oke-Aro pig settlement, as four farmers have been confirmed dead while another thirty are currently hospitalised from shock and high blood pressure brought on by the inability to repay the millions of naira worth of loans taken out to support their farms. Most of these farmers have no insurance premiums, and many are watching their investments, some of which are backed by borrowed funds from development and commercial banks, go down the drain. They are calling for assistance to revive the sector and preserve human lives.

Also Read: Black Mamba- Changing the world one chilli at a time

The situation has not gone unnoticed, with farmers taking to social media to lament the challenges the disease has brought about. Many fear the high mortality rates and complain that pigs are being sold at drastic losses for fear of death and to avoid total loss. Fully bred pigs weighing over 70kg are in some cases selling for as low as ₦1500.Other farmers joined in to cite their losses in other areas of livestock farming with Newcastle disease that affects poultry and can also result in total loss of investment.

The Oke-Aro tragedy highlights the importance of the African Farmers’ Stories campaign – to tell the important stories to attract investors and policy makers into the agricultural sector. Indeed, the time to support the African farmer and other entrepreneurs is now, as jobs and livelihoods are being lost. There is an urgent need for investors to address areas such as the recycling sector to recycle the waste from piggeries and to contribute to value addition to the pigs, extension services to support and educate farmers, and policy makers to ensure constant supervision of the standard of hygiene within the settlement.

Article By: Victoria Madedor of Support4AfricanSMEs

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Agriculture

COVID-19 Pandemic disrupting our food supply chain – What Next?

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Vertical farming. Image credit: Josephine Favre

The COVID-19 Pandemic is challenging us. None of us saw it coming!

Everything around us is changing, from our behaviour in how we deal with the nitty gritty little things to the way on how we look at managing our businesses under Lockdown.

At this point of time, food advocates, including smallholder farmers are facing immense pressure not only on food production, but on distribution/supply due to many countries and their boarders suddenly closing.

There are some countries that are better managed than others thus can go by with their activities on a daily basis, however there are many countries still lacking the appropriate support and expertise necessary to implement sustainable, suitable and appropriate food transition during this Pandemic.

Our entire supply demand chain could so easily be redesigned or redefined due to the COVID-19 Pandemic and the associated economic disruption.

What does that mean? It means owners of food production will need to find ways to monetize their existence. These will result to immediate self-production, leading to door to door delivery of everything we need and consume to our homes.

Building a food production infrastructure which uses less land, less water, less fertilizer and puts higher value, nutritious food at the doorstep of the consumer, is undoubtedly a huge step forward for agriculture and human development.

We are at a point when the technology not only already exists but is improving at an exponential rate; the question is not when but how? How big of a role can vertical farming play in securing the availability of food for future generations while protecting the planet in the process.

Integrating sustainable food production into the urban environment and becoming climate resilient is a necessary step for a modern society. Vertical Farming offers all of this, while also serving as a tool for uplifting quality of life in densely-populated urban areas.

Vertical farming is a smart solution that will use the most advanced technologies in agriculture to provide answers to food production questions. Vertical farms are climate controlled and produce the same quality of food regardless of environmental factors like droughts, floods, pests and disease. By remaining independent of the outdoor environment, vertical farms can provide food for urban and rural areas alike that suffer from food shortage during periods of extreme weather or disease.

Vertical farming

It is more clear now that Vertical Farming is no longer just an Urban Farming solutions but a general farming solution given today’s climate changes such as heat waves, extreme floods etc. We need to be in control and Vertical Farming or CEA gives us just that, RESILIENCE.

Also Read: Sub-Saharan Africa steps up efforts to boost local food & beverage manufacturing

The African Association for Vertical Farming (AAVF) is playing a very big role to ensure that the farming community (and potential Agriprenuers) are aware of Vertical Faring as a modern way of farming that ascertain productivity despite climate change challenges, while addressing food security delivery.

We the AAVF at this point of time advice every family owning land, small or big, a balcony or a side garden to learn on how to produce, or provide for themselves and their own by using Vertical Farming Technologies as their agriculture method starting from now.

New technologies for single household to complex business projects can now easily be taught. Join us for our online Vertical Farming Trainings at: https://www.aavf.ch/copy-ofapplication-form-1

There can be no doubt that we have to act now and move toward more sustainable thinking in food practices.

We can do this together!

Article By: Josephine Favre, President The African Association for Vertical Farming

Visit: The African Association for Vertical Farming

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