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Is Africa becoming a female sex tourism destination?

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Cast members of Paradies: Liebe”, a German film about female sex tourism. Pic: REUTERS/Vincent Kessler

Finally, African men’s sexual prowess can be put to use. Already, quite a number of women from the western world are embarking on sex tourism trips to Africa.

When they come, they are served, serviced and pampered, writes Tatenda Gwaambuka on how female sex tourists are exploiting African men.”Older women from Europe and North America are now known to frequent African resorts in pursuit of ‘sexcapades’ as they are called,” Tatenda describes.

“The scenery in Africa is great, that cannot be doubted. European women cannot get enough of it, but beyond the scenery, there is a new attraction drawing them in. When they want to have a good time no one will know about back home where they are held in high esteem, they come to Africa. Young men stage-manage romantic affairs with the older European women and get to wine and dine with them.”

It is possible also to upgrade the quality of this kind of tourism trip. Instead of calling it female sex tourism, it can be branded as female love tourism. So we can promote Africa as a female love tourism destination.

We all know that we now live in a globalised world, and that the world is shrinking more and more into a global village. If more love relationships can be forged between Europeans, Americans and women of other parts of the world and Africans, it is a welcome development. Better still, if they can get entangled emotionally, get married and produce children.

And the African men are quite efficient in the service. The dollars are rolling in, business is good. But some say it is an immoral trade, while others say it is exploitative.

According to Tatenda: “In 2007, Reuters ran a story on the Kenyan sex tourism phenomenon detailing the story of one Bethan (then aged 56) and her best friend Allie (then aged 64) who were on their first holiday to Kenya. They said the country was “just full of big young boys who like us older girls.” Jake Grieves-Cook, then chairman of the Kenya Tourist Board answering a question about the perception of sex-tourism said: “It’s not evil but it’s certainly something we frown upon.”

But there are risks too. Tatenda informs us that “Julia Davidson, a Nottingham University fellow’s findings were that some women shunned condoms and regarded them as too “businesslike” for their needs. It could be the same with women as old as Bethan and Allie. This may not be good for both parties in Africa where HIV/AID is still being battled.

But those involved in these erotic trips are not deterred by fear of any disease. “Writing for the Sydney Morning Herald, Matty Silver said women, particularly the wealthy, single and older white women, plan holidays to have romance and sex with companions who make them feel special.” writes Tetenda.

Some also express their concern that female sex tourism to Africa is exploitative just as they had initially deceived Africans and took away all their human and material resources. Yet, some of the female sex tourists argue they are improving the lives of African men.

“Male sex tourism has for long been regarded as exploitative behaviour but somehow, the story changes when it comes to the female version of the same trade. The ladies cover their tracks by claiming they are not buying sex but they are helping out the young men financially.

In her defence, Reuters’ interviewee, Bethan said: “It is a social arrangement. I buy him a nice shirt and we go out for dinner. For as long as he stays with me, he doesn’t pay for anything, and I, what I want? – a good time. How is that different from a man buying a young girl dinner?” Tatenda reports.

One of those critics of female sex tourism to Africa is Julie Bindel, a political activist and founder of Justice for Women. Tatenda reports that she “advises the world not to buy into these women’s delusions; that the exploitation endemic in prostitution does not disappear when women are the buyers.

“Why sugar-coat it? These women are coming to Africa to buy sex and the moment they do, they engage in prostitution (however they may try to sanctify it as a mutually beneficial activity). Female sex tourism is the expression of racial and economic dominance.

Tatenda presents a Canadian woman interviewed by Bindel of which she says unwittingly exposed the exploitative nature of the trade. “If he doesn’t perform, he doesn’t get to eat. End of story,” said a female sex tourist.

Read the full article on Travel Wire News

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Hospitality & Tourism

Radisson Hotel Ahmed Raza On Moving to Nigeria

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Radisson Hotel Group General Manager, Ahmed Raza (Image: Supplied)

Ahmed Raza is an experienced operator with a demonstrated history of working in the hospitality industry. Skilled in catering, hospitality industry, menu costing, property management systems, and MICROS. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, Ahmed shares his experience on moving to Nigeria, the hospitality business, impact of Covid-19 and much more. Excerpts.

 

Alaba: Moving to Nigeria to work, what’s different?

Ahmed: I have been very blessed and fortunate to be able to see the hospitality industry in different places including Asia, the US and now Africa. Every country, every culture has a completely different style and something that makes it its own. I think the hospitality culture is definitely growing in West Africa. Being in Nigeria, it is a very hospitable country. Nigerians are very warm and friendly, they are hustlers and go-getters and bringing that and refining that service culture is something that is really starting to pick up here.

It is a huge service driven country and I have seen a lot more people wanting to engage in proper training and getting proper experience so that they are knowledgeable about what it is that they are selling so in time the service industry is going to match up with its international competitors. That is what I believe, we are not there yet, there are a lot of things that need to change and happen but the nice thing about it is that groups like Radisson Hotel Group are dedicated to implementing the proper training programs for its teams and staff.

Alaba: How is Radisson different from your previous experience?

Ahmed: Radisson Hotel Group is flying high in the hospitality industry. Today it stands as one of the largest hotel groups in the world, with more than 1,400 hotels in operation or under development. The Radisson brand stands out for me because it believes that people are at the centre of a successful hospitality business. The foremost way to be a responsible company is to have ethical business practices at the core of our culture. Our ethical standards can be seen every day in the way we treat all our stakeholders from customers and team members to suppliers and other business partners.

Alaba: Talking of this period of COVID-19 pandemic, how are you managing?

Ahmed: From the onset of the pandemic, it was clear to me that this was a rare and massive change. Along with the team we decided to focus on bringing positive results and understood that the only way of succeeding is to become agile and dynamic. We engaged with all our guests and bookers in a way of looking forward to the end of the crisis, building lasting relationships that would benefit the hotel in times to come.

Radisson Hotel Group was the leading chain in developing Safety Protocols in order to prepare for guests to return. This association with the Swiss-based SGS, the world’s leading inspection, verification, testing, and certification company, led to a full review of the best health and safety practices. The outcome was the 10-step and 20-step protocols that ensure that all aspects of wellbeing and safety of both the staff and guests are the primary focus of what we do. Those tools gave us the confidence to put go-to-market strategies that resulted in additional business for the hotel, increasing our market share substantially.

Alaba: What is the extent of the impact COVID-19 has on the hospitality sector in Nigeria?

Ahmed: These are uncharted waters; we have gone back to the times of Ebola. Although this was mainly localized around the West African region but with a phenomenally higher fatality rate of over 90% compared to Covid of around 10%. The hospitality and aviation industry were the first and have been the worst hit so far. This is mostly because the industry is primarily involved in the provision of accommodation, transportation, entertainment, food, and other services to individuals who move from place to place for business and pleasure. Restriction of movement was one of the first steps taken to combat the virus, and then the eventual closure of borders and domestic travel.

In fact, it is estimated that travel will decrease by 40-50 per cent after the pandemic restrictions are removed. It is also important to note the shift of the pandemic epicentre from China to Western Europe and US which are the hotel’s industry’s major source markets and therefore the economic impact to the sector is far reaching. Keeping in view the fact that the total contribution of tourism in Nigeria to the country’s GDP is 35%, it accounts for huge economic and social losses from this sector alone.

Alaba: Radisson Blu Victoria Island has just carried out refurbishment, how much of a game changer is this for you

Ahmed: The hotel has rolled out a comprehensive strategy of innovation and renovation concentrating on the safety of the guests to accelerate the anticipated recovery from the pandemic. Radisson Blu Anchorage Lagos has embarked on an ambitious renovation exercise to the tune of a substantial investment with the sole aim of guaranteeing the safety and convenience of guests during and post the coronavirus pandemic. The rooms are wearing a new colour, blends meant to continuously brighten the mood of guests while the gym and the pool have been redesigned with modern equipment for guests’ pleasure.

Alaba: How do you sustain this position?

Ahmed: Through continuous improvement – innovation transfers across the brand e.g. Hybrid Meetings, Carbon neutral meetings, training, strong marketing and PR machinery.

Alaba: What is the percentage of Nigerian guests that come to your hotel?

Ahmed: 75% – to be confirmed

Alaba: With vaccines on the horizon, how hopeful are you for normalcy to return?

Ahmed: Our typical customers are the top corporates looking for personalised experiences and service. We like to call this a rollout of the micro-vacation. With vaccination rates being up, the domestic leisure travel segment is breathing life into Nigeria’s hospitality industry, we are on the road to full recovery. There is a lot of pent-up demand, especially in the luxury segment of hotels. For example, we are seeing extremely high demand in Lagos for leisure, our rates have not dropped. For domestic travellers, we are offering flexibility in their booking dates and a wholesome, future-ready experience tailored to the ‘new normal’ that we are all faced with today.

Alaba: In your projection, what direction will the hospitality business be taking in 2022/2023?

Ahmed: It is important to remember that the hospitality sector is no stranger to crisis. Our industry has survived countless challenges and periods of economic downturn, and COVID-19 is no exception. Industry experts predict that the industry might begin seeing a rebound in typical demand within 18 to 24 months. Understandably, hotels will be expected to adopt heightened cleaning standards moving forward, as cleanliness will be a critical factor in a guests’ decision to book a hotel room.

Secondly, technology. Love it or hate it, the hospitality business cannot ignore it. Hospitality providers will need to serve guests in a significantly more connected way, striking the right balance between automated solutions and human interaction. So much change. And so much of it is driven by the most important person in hospitality: the guest. Every brand operating in this dynamic and innovation-friendly market wouldn’t have it any other way.

Alaba: What is your favourite local meal, any special hobbies?

Ahmed: Suya and Pepper Soup anytime of the day, I have a great passion for Tennis. Currently play at club level to unwind from the daily routine.

Alaba: What legacy do you want to leave after your time here?

Ahmed: There is no doubt that the success of this hotel, and customer satisfaction is the best legacy I would like to leave behind.

 

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Hospitality & Tourism

Radisson Hotel Group announces a transition in its African leadership team

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Radisson Hotel Group Bert Fol and Sandra Kneubuhler (Image: RHG)

Radisson Hotel Group announces a transition in its African leadership team with the appointment of Bert Fol as Regional Director for Africa, focusing on English Speaking Africa and the promotion of Sandra Kneubuhler to District Director for South Africa, in addition to her role as Country Director of Sales.

Sandra Kneubuhler, Country Director of Sales and District Director, South Africa.

Kneubuhler, a South African national, started her hospitality career in 2001, holding various positions in Zambia, Switzerland, Thailand, and Qatar before returning to South Africa. In 2005, she assumed the role of Corporate Trainee at the Hyatt Regency Johannesburg, progressing within the group in roles such as Sales Manager, Revenue Manager and acting GM before launching the group’s Global Sales Office as the Global Sales Director: Africa, a position she held since January 2015.

Drawing on her extensive sales experience and local market insight, Kneubuhler joined Radisson Hotel Group in February 2019 as Country Sales Director for South Africa. Developing and leading the Group’s dynamic sales structure. Ever since Kneubuhler and her team have delivered exceptional results, especially during the challenging pandemic period.

In her new role, Kneubuhler assumes the additional responsibility of overseeing the operations for all Radisson Hotels in South Africa, working closely with the Group’s Regional Director for English-Speaking Africa, Bert Fol.

“Since joining the Group three years ago, Sandra has demonstrated through her passion for the industry remarkable results. Even when faced with the most difficult circumstances due to the pandemic. As a Group, we firmly believe in balanced leadership and developing our talent. And with a team player like Sandra who is powered by passion and forward thinking, it was a natural next step in her career progression which we believe will prove rewarding in every aspect. says Bert Fol, Regional Director, Africa, Radisson Hotel Group.

Bert Fol, Regional Director, Africa

Fol, a hospitality veteran with 30+ years’ experience in the hospitality industry, worked for some of the largest and most prestigious global hotel chains. Before joining Radisson Hotel Group in January 2014 as Cluster General Manager of the Radisson Blu Hotel, Bucharest and Park Inn by Radisson Bucharest. In addition to his role as General Manager, Fol also had hotels in Turkey reporting to him in his capacity as District Director.

Since 2017, Fol has successfully led Northern Africa and thereafter, the Arabian Peninsula and East Africa as Regional Director. Within his capacity as Regional Director, he will now lead the operations in English-speaking African countries.

“With Bert’s wealth of industry knowledge and his standout leadership qualities, he has made strides for the Group within numerous key markets. I have no doubt that he will be equally successful delivering results in his new area of responsibility.” said Tim Cordon, Area Senior Vice President, Middle East & Africa at Radisson Hotel Group.

 

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Hospitality & Tourism

Abuja Culinary School Launches The Tertiary and Secondary Education Culinary Art Project (SECA)

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Abuja Culinary School Students and Facilitator (Photo: Supplied)

The Abuja Culinary School The SECA (Secondary Education Culinary Arts) initiative is a project that aims to train 1 million secondary and tertiary school students in Culinary Arts Education. This gives students across the world access to their comprehensive online lesson module consisting of lecture notes. And more than 25 learning videos of different dishes, including pastry, continental dishes and African dishes for a period of one year 100% free.

The Abuja Culinary School is on a mission to open up the culinary industry and its boundless opportunities to the young ones. It believes this opportunity will pique their interest in pursuing a career in Culinary Arts. and raise the next generation of food industrialists, food technologists, food designers and chefs. They also believe it will increase their students’ ability to earn an income. And raise a generation of thinkers who will proffer solutions to food problems and break new frontiers in the culinary arts industry.

As one of the top culinary schools in Nigeria, The School’s vision is to see the culinary industry in Nigeria, develop, impact, and uplift people. The importance of knowing how to cook like a true chef is rewarding health-wise and economically. The hospitality industry accounts for billions of dollars in revenue yearly. So, why not get a skill that helps you get a chunk of that money.

Do you want to become a skilled Chef, food technologist, food designer or food blogger, baker, a restaurant manager or owner? The Abuja Culinary Courses, ensure you get the right skills and culinary education that will set you apart from others. With different courses that are a good fit if you are joining the food and hospitality industry.

Register with this Link

 

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