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Interview With Deborah Ogwuche, Founder Of Food Channel Africa

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Deborah Ogwuche is a published author, food blogger, healthy food advocate and the Founder of Food Channel Africa. She is interested in bringing awareness to healthy traditional diets that have been time- proven and tested to benefit humans. In this interview with  Alaba Ayinuola, Deborah shares insights on what inspired her to launch Food Channel Africa, her entrepreneurship journey and how she is promoting African cuisine.  Excerpt.

Alaba: Kindly tell us about Food Channel Africa and the gap it’s filling?

Deborah: Africa is blessed with so many natural resources with a diverse and vibrant young population. As its population is dynamic so also is it’s varied nutritious traditional cuisines which is part of our heritage. Food channel Africa TV is a 24-hour food television channel that will showcase traditional cuisines from all over Nigeria and Africa.

Alaba: What was your start-up capital and how were you able to raise it?

Deborah: Up till this point, we have self-funded the venture. It’s quite challenging because when you have a project this big especially being the first of its kind, there is the usual reluctance but we are dogged in our vision to promote our rich nutrition culture and food to the world. Therefore, we believe that adequate funding to actualise the vision is only a matter of time.

Alaba: What are the challenges, competition and how are you overcoming them?

Deborah: The business landscape in Nigeria has experienced growth in the last few years but is still developing and asa woman, a wife and a mum, it’s certainly challenging trying to balance the roles. It is not easy but it is possible!

Growing up I have always done what people said I couldn’t do or shouldn’t do. For instance, my baby was just 7 months old when I founded Food Channel Africa. I faced a lot of doubt and guilt about caring for my baby and trying to build this vison but thankfully I had a solid support system from my family.

 Also, as a published author and a food blogger, I know that when you start something big like building the first 24-hour television dedicated to food, tourism and culture there are bound to be bottle- necks. What I did first is build capacity in my area of endeavour, put together a dynamic team who understand the vision and get to work. Therefore, my team and I do not see problems as obstacles but as opportunity for learning. And lastly, I never ever give up.

Alaba: Can you tell us more about your entrepreneurship journey and the learning curves?

Deborah: To be honest I thought writing would be my profession which it was for 4 years as a copywriter and published author. But what I also loved being an entrepreneur. While growing up, my parents and people around me were career professionals so I had no one to model after in terms entrepreneurship.

In spite of that, my entrepreneurial journey started at 17 years old when a friend and I bought a popcorn machine and sold popcorn to people on the streets. That was a learning curve for me because as a young girl, I could see how for instance power supply could help businesses thrive. We roasted the popcorns on generators but every profit we made went into fueling the popcorn machine.

Later in the year I got admission into the university and had to pack up the business but the lessons from that time stayed with me.And the lesson was, without proper infrastructure, businesses will continue to struggle. I have since embarked on more than 5 different businesses up till date.

Alaba: What’s the inspiration behind Food Channel Africa and how are you funding it?

Deborah: Food channel Africa came to be out of a mixture of frustration and passion. Frustration and passion because, we were losing our traditional diet history with our diet becoming increasingly unhealthy. No one was paying attention to the fact that Africa wasn’t just rich in its vast natural resources but also in its delicious, healthy and diverse cuisines. I read extensively about the French diet and so many diets from different regions of the world.

My recent travel to France only cemented the fact that African cuisine is one of the world’s healthiest cuisine and needs to be well- represented on the world’s stage. That’s our mission at Food Channel Africa.This is why we are actively seeking for investment to actualise this great vision.

Alaba: How are you promoting our African foods and culture?

Deborah: Food channel Africa is a 24-hour food television channel solely dedicated to promoting African cuisine, culture and tourism. We are developing programs that will not only showcase different traditional meals and how they prepared but also show the deep and rich culture of different African locality, the history behind some of the popular cuisines and the people’s cultural heritage. Food Channel Africa will be informative, educative and entertaining.

It will also boost the food industry in Africa and encourage the youth to pursue culinary education as a career. We would make Michelin stars out of cooks and chefs, people who will in turn take Africa to the world.

Alaba: How do you feel as an African entrepreneur?

Deborah: I feel blessed being an African entrepreneur in this time because of a lot of opportunities opened up to entrepreneurs in the continent. The government and other organization’s drive to open up opportunities to African entrepreneurs especially women in terms of investment is commendable. However, I feel foreign investment shouldn’t be too restrictive to only fin-tech and online ventures.

The food industry and media industry are at a pivotal point as regards development in Nigeria and investors should be encouraged to invest in these areas because of the abounding opportunities and growth in that sector. The media industry is also seeing a lot of development because recently Nigeria converted from the analogue model to digital freeing up a lot of white space for content producers like Food Channel Africa.

Alaba: How can government best support entrepreneurs in Africa?

Deborah: The government’s economic initiatives aimed at empowering entrepreneurs is commendable but more work needs to be done. Incentives and legislation that encourages foreign investments and improve access to credit and loan facilities should be enacted. The government should provide infrastructure and economic enablers like tax incentives for small and medium scale enterprises. A safe and working society is also vital in ensuring business growth and development.

Alaba: What’s your advice for aspiring entrepreneurs and investors in Africa?

Deborah: My advice for aspiring entrepreneurs in Africa is invest in yourself by building capacity in your chosen endeavour. Don’t use short-cuts or fall into the trap of making money quickly. Do your due diligence and don’t lose focus. If you bring a product in to the market for example, stick to the standard or improve don’t cut corner because you want more turn-overs. Integrity in business is priceless and rewarding so have integrity. Don’t settle for less and keep innovating!

My advice to investors is the best time to invest in African businesses is now. Don’t be left out!

Alaba: What inspires you and keeps you going?

Deborah: I believe true success is not how many material wealth you acquire but the number of people you impacted. What keeps me going is knowing that I am directly impacting so many lives and building a legacy that is bigger than me and would outlive me.

Alaba: How do you relax and what books do you read?

Deborah: I relax by reading. I love reading about history and biographies of great men and women. Give me a nice chilled (natural) drink, a snack and a good book and I’m as good as new. Cooking also helps me relax and is therapeutic for me.

Also Read: Meet Sivi Malukisa, The Congolese Entrepreneur Whose Food Startup Is Promoting DRC Cuisine

B I O G R A P H Y

Deborah Ogwuche is the creative director and founder of Food Channel Africa, a 24-hour television channel dedicated to showcasing African cuisines. She is a published author, a food blogger and a healthy food advocate.

Email: [email protected]

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Building Sustainable and Profitable Enterprises: An Interview with David Owumi, Founder of VisionCTRL Africa

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David Owumi is the Founder and Lead Business Innovation Strategist at VisionCTRL Africa, a business analysis, design and consulting firm based in Nigeria. A social entrepreneur on a mission to achieve a lifetime commitment, driving Africa’s sustainable development in the Fourth Industrial Revolution(4IR). David in this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, talks about how his brand is developing its support for African entrepreneurs, the Business Drive for Her Initiative, why women talents should be developed and transformed into valuable tools for social and economic growth. Excerpt.

Alaba: Kindly tell us about VisionCTRL and the gap its filling?

David: VisionCTRL Nigeria, founded in 2018, consists of a team of seasoned Business Innovators, Business Designers and Business Analysts committed to providing professional business development services small and medium scaled organizations. We help our league of depending clients create innovative products, services and formidable business structures necessary to deliver on remarkable value propositions while scaling to generate more revenue and market share.

At VisionCTRL, we believe in the power of Social Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Technology as vital tools for the positive transformation of the African economy, creating solutions to social problems such as Poverty, Lack of Quality Education, Unemployment, and Infrastructural Deficit.

Alaba: What sparked your interest in starting this firm?

David: From the age of 10, when I started accompanying my mother to destitute and orphanage homes dispensing amenities such as food and medical kits, I have always wanted to solve social problems but ignorant as to which to focus on. My passion for social innovation, entrepreneurship and business matured as I followed religiously the popular TV series “Shark Tank”, unconsciously preparing myself for VisionCTRL.

Few months after we launched Salt Talks Africa in March of 2018 with a focus on fostering sustainable development in grassroots communities, we saw a need to help entrepreneurs start sustainable businesses that “solve real problems for real people”.

Alaba: How is VisionCTRL developing its support for African entrepreneurs?

David: We help startups and small scale businesses with their Market Research, Feasibility Study, Business Planning, Business Model Innovation, Product/Service Innovation and Business Development. We also provide Free Business Consultation, and organize business management workshops across the federation.

Alaba: Could you tell us about the “Business Drive for Her Initiative” and what it’s set out to achieve?

David: In Nigeria, and Africa as a whole, we’re coming to an understanding of the crucial roles women play in fostering socioeconomic growth in a community, through education and entrepreneurship. This has spurred government, as well as civil societies, to initiate programmes and opportunities to fast track gender inclusivity in education and entrepreneurship on the continent.

The Business Drive for Her Initiative is one of those projects we designed for the sole purpose of educating female entrepreneurs in Nigeria on the basics of business planning, management and innovation, to scale their businesses with a corresponding socio-economic growth in the country.

I believe it takes a collective effort, i.e. both the private and public sectors, to initiate projects that would lead to the long-term, growth of the African economy, and so, we have decided to contribute our quota.

We would be training 6,000 female entrepreneurs across 16 states in Nigeria in partnership with Tech Hubs in the country on Business Management and Innovation, as well as providing mentorship and funding opportunities in partnership with Access Bank.

Alaba: How do you intend to fund this project and measure its impact?

David: To be honest, this is a major challenge faced by social innovators in the private sector, designing financial sustainability for social projects, and as such we emphasize the importance of strategic partnerships. Asides funds set aside by the organization for the project, we consorted with tech hubs in Nigeria, and other organizations that share a common interest for women empowerment in the country, with Access Bank PLC, Salt Talks Africa and Adams Start being some of our major supporters.

Engaging Salt Talks Africa in the project development phase made our planning easier due to their experience in designing sustainable projects. So, instead of asking “Where can we get funds?” we rather sought organizations willing to provide some of the items and logistics we would be spending money on.

Its always better achieving success together.

Alaba: Why is it important for women to start their business?

David: Beyond business, it’s imperative that the talents and interests of women be developed and transformed into valuable tools for social and economic growth. It’s about empowering women with the freedom and opportunities to create and trade value with a sense of belonging, and responsibility for the development of their immediate communities, and the world at large. If women can, then why not?

Alaba: How can we increase capital, confidence and capability in women’s entrepreneurship?

David: It all begins in the home, educating parents on the importance and benefits of a gender inclusive society. Unfortunately, there are families that choose to invest their limited resources on the male over the female. This has to change, and we look up to civil societies and human right activists to champion this cause.

Though impressive measures have been taken to foster female participation in business, education and leadership in Nigeria and Africa, it’s just the tip of the iceberg. We need private and public agencies to deliberately allocate opportunities to women as a way of encouraging others at the bottom to strive for the same.

Alaba: What is your advice for any young woman who is thinking about starting a business?

David: If you can create value, and you are convinced you can execute well on your value propositions, why not? Being a woman is no excuse for mediocrity. Hone your craft, and be the best you can.

Alaba: How do you feel as an African entrepreneur?

David: I feel honored contributing to the advancement of Africa’s sustainable development. There’s no better time to be African than now, and making a conscious and deliberate effort daily to push the continent forward is one decision I’m proud of, despite the intricacies associated with starting and growing an enterprise in Africa.

Alaba: What’s the future for your business and what steps are you taking towards achieving them?

David: At VisionCTRL, we are on a daily mission to be a part of the success stories of businesses driving social growth and economic development in Nigeria, and Africa. We want to understand the dynamics of entrepreneurship and innovation on Africa, and supporting African businesses to be well positioned for these trends for maximum social impact.

To achieve this, we invest a considerable amount of resources in organizing workshops for entrepreneurs, as well as improving our knowledge and operations.

Alaba: How do you relax and what books do you read?

David: I spend my leisure with family, and often researching. I’m a huge fan of Africa’s history, especially the colonial era. So, I’m often caught reading about the history of Africa on Wikipedia.

Also Read: Interview: Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy For Girls Executive Director, Gugulethu Ndebele On Girls And Leadership

B I O G R A P H Y

Owumi David Voke, 27, is a Social Entrepreneur, Tech-Innovator, Community Research & Developer and Fashion Designer, who is on a mission to achieve a lifetime commitment, driving Africa’s sustainable development in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. David is a graduate of University of Benin, Nigeria where he bagged a Second-Class degree in Mathematics and Education.

He is the Director of Salt Talks Africa, a para-governmental organization currently operating in 3 African countries, designing and executing community development projects geared towards fostering sustainable development in rural communities across Africa. Through grassroots initiatives such a RuraLearn, R.E.I.A., Project Upcycle and Salt Talks Conferences held across Nigeria, Salt Talks Africa is indeed fostering Africa’s sustainable development in one of the most strategic approaches.

David is the Founder and Lead Business Innovation Strategist of VisionCTRL Africa, a Business Analysis, Design and Consulting Firm in Nigeria, building disruptive business ideas and enterprises. He believes disruptive social entrepreneurship plays a vital role in driving socioeconomic growth and sustainable development in Africa.

Having worked on several high-end successful and failed projects such as Upnepa.ng, Agro-Ex, Haypko.com (Now FuelUp.ng), Sew It Stores (Now Gods Official Clothiers), Hi-traffic.tech etc., VisionCTRL is well positioned to change the narrative of Africa leveraging an entrepreneurship framework.

He is also an advisory member of African Bio hub, Invent Hope Initiative etc. and a member of the International Institute of Business Analysts (IIBA).

Visit VisionCTRL

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Interview with James Lawson, Founder, Intergreatme; A RegTech Company Helping You Create Your Own Digital Identity

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James Lawson is the Founder and Chief Information Officer at Intergreatme, a global digital identity platform that can be integrated into a wide range of businesses in less than a day to bring identity verification and secure multi-factor authentication in seconds. In this exclusive interview with Heath Muchena of Business Africa Online, Lawson shares insights into his approach to leadership as CIO of a technology company, scaling a digital business, and overcoming operational challenges in the Know-Your-Customer (KYC) and ID verification space. Excerpt.

Heath: CIO roles in today’s IT environment are quite dynamic. What do you enjoy most about your role?

James: Each day is completely different from the next. I try and plan what I can in the morning, and then spend the rest of my day engaging with executives, development team, support agents, and with our clients.We have a dynamic business, and being a start-up means we are constantly dealing with resource constraints – which isn’t a bad thing, it forces you to focus on the most important tasks at hand.

I enjoy the freedom that I have around exploring new technologies, looking at existing products and looking at how we can optimise not only the code we have, but the products and services we use to run the business.I am also analytical and detail oriented. I build my own reports, interrogate the data, and use it to build data-driven decisions to help optimise the business. This helps to provide recommendations to our customers as to how they can optimise processes where our technology plays a role in their onboarding process, especially where they can achieve greater savings by implementing quick-win solutions.

Heath: Describe your leadership style? How do you lead through change?

James: My main leadership style is through servant leadership. As such, I believe that the technology side of the business is most effective when employees are given the opportunities to make their own choices, and for me to support them in those choices (unless I can see there is an obvious issue with the decision-making process). This also gives each individual a high degree of autonomy, and we have really worked hard to try and build self-managing teams.

This is also really reflected in my attitude towards servicing our customers. That does not mean to say that I am a “yes man” and will implement every product feature that a customer asks for, but that I will hear our customers out, and advise them on the best route forward – and sometimes decision that involves persuading them to cut out a feature, though proven experience in our product domain.

Also Read: Interview With Amadou Diallo, CEO of DHL Global Forwarding Middle East & Africa

Heath: Can you explain the most difficult part of being a leader?

James: The most difficult part of being a leader is dealing with the decisions no one else is prepared to make. Sometimes, those decisions are not the popular ones. But at the end of the day, the decisions I make in the business are always focused towards the betterment of the company, and the people working inside of it.

Heath: To what do you attribute your success? How has it impacted your enterprise digital goals?

James: I consider myself fortunate that I have been able to move between different industries. I have worked in several non-technical jobs in banking and finance; have lectured at several universities, worked as a journalist, as well as in tech-and-management roles. While some might consider this a more… checked past, I see this as a valuable attribution to my collective knowledge and experience in the workplace.

One of the more innovative solutions I helped design was for a training institute, where we digitised the manual process of getting classroom labs set-up into an automated one. Before setting up a lab, a technician is required to manually copy each image across to the computer, often a symmetric process of copying the image across one-computer at a time. Working with the internal development team I managed (along with 3 other departments), we incorporated BitTorrent into the classrooms and built a Web-UI classroom management solution.

This meant the technician could now do his work remotely, increased the speed at which classroom labs could be setup, but more importantly, if a student had an issue with their lab, a new instance could be deployed in seconds vs. minutes or hours to manually find the correct image on a server and copy it across.

The impact was massive in terms of time and money saved, as well as customer satisfaction.

Heath: Where do you see your business in two years?

James: Intergreatme has two products, an app where people can upload and manage their identity with form-completing services, like renewing their car licence disc; and our Know Your Customer (Self-KYC) solution that handles the remote collection, validation, and verification of personal information to help businesses comply with their regulatory requirements, such as FICA and RICA.

I believe in the next two years that we will see a shift to our coresolution as corporate South Africa comes to grips with regulations like therisk-based KYC approach and the eventual implementation of Protection of Personal Information Act (POPI).

Heath: What are some of the challenges you face from a day-to-day operational perspective?

James: I would say my biggest operational challenge is keeping the focus in the company on the route forward – the identity space can be disrupted in so many ways! It is easy for someone to come up with an idea that is entirely feasible, and easy to implement; but knowing when to show restraint and say no, is one of my biggest daily challenges.

It can also be very tough to motivate the various teams, especially when we are under pressure to deliver product. I am proud to say I was able to refine our internal development process to reduce the stress levels of everyone in the dev. team, while also keeping stakeholders happy. We moved from break-neck development with long hours, and tight deadlines, to a more sensible flow.

Understanding policy, especially from a local regulatory stance. Our business is built around identity, and trust, and ensuring that we not only build a product around these regulations, but also that we employ a best-effort approach to securing our services.

Visit Intergreatme

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How This Tanzanian Is Building An eLearning Platform For Students To Learn, Discuss and Network

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Kizwalo Simbila is the Founder of SchoolBiz Forums, a growing online student community and social learning platform for schools and universities. He is passionate about Youth Development and thrives in raising young people in leadership. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, Kizwalo reflects on his entrepreneurial journey, talks about SchoolBiz Forums, how it operates, challenges of eLearning in Tanzania, the future of his company and much more. Excerpt.

Alaba: Tell us about SchoolBiz Forums and the gap its filling?

Kizwalo: For instance, students could be located off-campus for the duration of their enrollment and successfully do discussions online. It is important to mention that online platforms include discussing at all levels of education. In recent time, the Online Education industry recorded strong growth and of course this is due to rising internet penetration in households and changing consumer preferences that favor conducting online discussions.

SchoolBiz Forums is the growing online student community and social learning mobile application for schools and universities. It was founded in the year 2016 and designed for every student to use and support each other –whatever their background through education, life around learning, all the way through to careers. They are given opportunities to Learn, Discuss and Network. SchoolBiz Forums is unlike any other Forums you will come across! At SchoolBiz Forums we seek to improve African education.

Alaba: What sparked your interest in starting this social enterprise?

Kizwalo: It resulted from prayer and burden to see African students and youth having a platform that will bring them together and do lean and network because we believe that this transformation lies in the hands and minds of studying youngsters with the desire to move lives toward prosperity and achievement.

Alaba: How are you funding your business?

Kizwalo: The platform is funded by me and our partners including Universities who we are working with to make changes and help students all around.

Alaba: What are the challenges, competitions and how are you overcoming them?

Kizwalo: Challenges are always there and we are here to learn from them. Getting a right team of people who can be trusted and move together towards the success of the company can be tricky sometimes. A successful business needs a strong foundation. Or more literally, founders. Before you bring in new hires, we have to be clear on our leadership positions. Tanzania has two platforms dealing with secondary schools education helping them with notes and quizzes. We can up with a new idea getting a platform for all students all over Africa that they can do more than just school and enjoy the atmosphere in there.

Overcoming the challenges is one of the factors of growing. That’s when you solved a mistake and next time you won’t repeat the same. Reading books and having mentors who can help me with ideas on how I can solve problems is one of the factors of me overcoming them.

Alaba: How does your organisation measure its impact?

Kizwalo: We measure our impact through the activities going on in the application. All we need is to make sure we have enough traffic of activities in the application.

Alaba: How is your business contributing to the development of the EdTech ecosystem in Tanzania?

Kizwalo: In the 2018, an article done in Tanzania about Adoption of E-learning systems in Tanzania’s universities says “Current studies indicate that there is no comprehensive instructor model in e-learning systems’ adoption in universities in Tanzania”. We want to be the only leading E-Learning platform in Tanzania that can be helpful to all students and solve different problems in and out of the border.

Alaba: What’s the future of your business and what steps are you taking to achieve them?

Kizwalo: Our future is to build an online educational brand that will become one of the preferred online educative platforms in the online community in Tanzania. We have to position our online forums to become one of the leading brands in and out of Tanzania. To make all this happen needs commitment, team work and new ideas to make the company better.

Alaba: How do you feel as an African entrepreneur?

Kizwalo: I feel hungry for more in Africa. “Entrepreneurs don’t wait for the right conditions” to start a business. “They create the right conditions.” I need to do more and take Africa somewhere because I am part of my continent and I will do all it takes for it’s development.

Alaba: What advice would you give potential entrepreneurs who intend to start a business or invest in Africa?

Kizwalo: Never stop learning. Starting your own business is a constant process of achievement and learning. It’s important to enrich yourself with both practical and emotional skills, it helps. Also “Take Risk”. Don’t be afraid to try new ideas. If it won’t work learn and try something else no matter the cost. That’s the life of an entrepreneur.

Alaba: How do you relax and what books do you read?

Kizwalo: I love travelling. Giving yourself some holiday to relax your kind is so important. That’s how I relax my mind and explore more than thinking. This year 2020 I will be reading more on Entrepreneurship and business books so that I can learn more and more.

Also Read: Interview With Amadou Diallo, CEO of DHL Global Forwarding Middle East & Africa

B I O G R A P H Y

Kizwalo Simbila, is the Founder of SchoolBiz Forums, Public speaker and entrepreneur from Tanzania. I am passionate about Youth Development and thrive in raising young people in leadership. I fancy deep discussions on what ways young people can impact the economic development in Tanzania.I strongly believe in the case of Tanzania, the brain drain has left a wound, which could only be healed if we go back and resuscitate the economy and education.

To learn more, visit: SchoolBiz Forums

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