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How this African Diaspora is keeping the tradition of African storytelling alive

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My name is Hermine Mbondo. I’m the founder of B4brand, a Toronto-based bilingual English/French storytelling-driven marketing agency for purpose-driven brands. While consumers are always enticed to buy more, at B4brand we believe that marketing has a greater purpose than consumerism and should empower people to buy smart, by putting their money where their heart is. So we made it our mission to create stories that connect brands that take a stand on values with people who share those values through engaging storytelling content.  

For some, storytelling has lately become a marketing buzzword. For us, at B4brand, storytelling is rooted in our identity. In fact, the B in B4brand stands for:

  • Brand – because we promote brands that are making a difference and have a positive impact –,
  • Bilingual – since we provide our services in English and French, Canada’s official languages, but we also offer a multilingual platform – and
  • Bassa – because our storytelling originates from the Bassa tribe of Cameroon, a tribe that has been using storytelling as part of their oral traditions to pass down knowledge from one generation to the next.

So, this is where my journey starts. I was born in the hinge of Africa, in a land where West and Central Africa meet. I grew up listening to these amazing tales during my summer vacations in our village. At twilight, one of my aunts would gather all the kids and start telling us stories before going to bed. Those legends, myths, tales, riddles, songs, and proverbs rocked my early childhood and inspired me to read more, write more, and somehow instilled in me a lifelong love for storytelling.

I left my native Cameroon and moved to France at 8 years of age. Among the many things that France has given to me, education by far was the game changer. I graduated from a business school with Master’s degree in Management, majoring in Consumer Marketing, and I quickly gained international work experience, holding various marketing and communications positions in France, Canada, and the US. But it wasn’t until I moved to Toronto in April 2016 that I fully embraced entrepreneurship.

I arrived in Toronto in a snowy yet beautiful day with my suitcase, a need for a change of scenery, my Master’s degree in my pocket, and a decade’s worth of international work experience. This cosmopolitan, vibrant, and bustling city seemed just like the perfect place for a fresh start. Toronto also turned out to be a great place to start a business venture and ignited my entrepreneurial spirit. So much so that I founded B4brand in 2017 and a few months later, I turned my side hustle into a full time business in 2018.

Entrepreneurship is not an easy road. Fortunately, Toronto’s booming entrepreneurial ecosystem provides resources to support business ideas and turn them into start-ups, from settlement and community organizations, to incubators, and accelerators, to name a few. Living in such a diverse city also gave me an unique opportunity to connect with a whole portion of the African Diaspora that I knew little to nothing about before, including Africans originally from English speaking countries. In my three years in Toronto, I have met so many smart, driven professionals, entrepreneurs, and investors who share the same desire to participate in Africa’s economic development.

We might be away from the motherland. We might not even share the same experiences or the same attachment to the motherland. However, it provides great hope to witness and take part in this rising movement of individuals who each, at their own level, contributes to take control of the African narrative and write our own story, by investing in and using technology to create a better future for Africans, among so many other entrepreneurial initiatives.

Also Read: The Rockefeller Foundation Appoints Two African Female Leaders to Board of Trustees

B I O G R A P H Y

Cameroonian-born B4brand founder, Hermine Mbondo, is an enthusiastic entrepreneur who is writing her story in her own unique way. Born in “Little Africa”, raised in France and now living in Canada, this bilingual English/French Marketing Consultant by day also happens to be a world-traveler by addiction, and a foodie by passion.

She graduated from a top French business school with a Master’s degree in Management, majoring in Consumer Marketing. Prior to focusing on storytelling, Hermine Mbondo started her career in Communications at a Paris-based agency then landed a position on a client side at Carrefour Group, one of the world’s largest retailers. She then expanded her skills and horizons and acquired valuable trade marketing skills, working directly with buyers and managing sales reps in the US. In 2012, she was appointed Marketing Manager of a French cookware manufacturer and spearheaded the rebranding of a portfolio of foodservice and retail brands, implementing effective online and offline worldwide marketing strategies.

With over a decade of international marketing experience under her belt, Hermine Mbondo decided in 2017, just a year after moving to Toronto, to use her proven marketing expertise for the greater good and founded B4brand, a storytelling-driven marketing agency for purpose-driven brands.

Email us at [email protected]

Visit us at B4brand

By: Hermine Mbondo

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Afripreneur

Building A Digital Marketplace For ‘Made In Nigeria’: Interview With Ukaegbu Great Jr, CEO, Keanyi

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Ukaegbu Great Jr, is the Founder and CEO of Keanyi an eCommerce consumer goods retail platform that connects exclusively local manufacturing sellers with consumers. He is responsible for the performance and long-term strategic development of this new startup. In this exclusive interview with Uchechukwu Ajuzieogu of Business Africa Online, Ukaegbu speaks on the Keanyi’s experience in the all ready existing Nigerian market, current state of the eCommerce sector, the biggest potentials for growth in Nigeria and outlined his company’s future plans.

Uchechukwu: Kindly share your set goals when assuming as the CEO, and how much progress has been made?

Ukaegbu: The role of the CEO has sent me back to Libraries and web directories , Every Single day, I read books and articles of becoming a better manager and understanding the market, above all I have adopted the culture of learning, unlearning and relearning. My goals as the CEO is to primarily see Keanyi reached our vision and goals as a company, creating thousands of Jobs and empowering Nigeria and African SMEs. Yes, I’m the CEO of Keanyi but sometimes I get scared to address myself as CEO because that’s not just a title, its work more than a war to conquer.

Uchechukwu: Can you provide some insights into Keanyi’s presence in Nigeria?

Ukaegbu: Keanyi was an idea that was conceived early 2016, then called Ariaria Online because we thought it to be more of an Aba thing, after much consultations, experts advised us to change the name because it will box our content and scope of reach. By early 2017 , we had re-branded to Keanyi adapted from an Igbo word ‘Nkeanyi’ which means our own. Keanyi was launched on the 3rd of October 2019 on the web space.

Our Goal is to put up made in Nigeria Products back to the map, and we will achieve it. After the launch we have seen lots of challenges and we are set to conquer them, Our primary interest was to boost to Aba market but we got negative signs on our radar with much rejections coming from the Aba manufacturers.

One of the interesting Facts about Keanyi’s presence is that 99.5% of vendors on Keanyi are from Lagos, and this is a good sign seeing Lagos as the hub of business, we might be concentrating more on Lagos, alongside Kano and probably Aba for vendors while targeting major cities in Nigeria.

Uchechukwu: What has been Keanyi’s experience in the market in terms of its challenges, competition and successes?

Ukaegbu: Keanyi’s experience in Nigeria has been that of Stable growth, our vendors keep increasing every Single day, One of the major challenges I have seen is acceptability. Keanyi is new and we are just One Month old and being an idea that seems to be swimming against a heavy wave of a growing economy, we are doing all to calm the tide. Challenges are there but we will bring bring them to justice. 

About Competitors, they will be there and I believe strategies makes the difference. Success is never a war won completely,it’s a continuous war and the only way to stay alive in the war is to keep winning every Single day.We are growing and waxing strong in the market.

Uchechukwu: In terms of reputation and performance, where would you like to see Keanyi and NIGERIA in 3–5 yrs?

Ukaegbu: Keanyi is a child in the industry. Let me make reference to a book of by my friend Obinna Uzoije: “Nigeria has never witnessed an industrial revolution and i believe the time is now.” Why is China dominating; Industrial dominance and control, just like the metamorphoses of the butterfly, I’m seeing Nigeria SMEs rise above SMEs to big business through Keanyi because our goal is to put Nigeria Products to the map. In the next 3 years, we will be setting the pace to connect African SMEs and businesses which we call the Shift 2023.

Uchechukwu: How would you evaluate the current state of the Local Manufacturing sector in Nigeria?

Ukaegbu: Manufacturing in Nigeria is indeed one the biggest challenges we are facing and ready to see it change. 78% of the SMEs producing, produces at request which I can tally to subsistence agriculture, their output most times is not much probably because of their mode of production/manufacturing. 

With Keanyi’s presence to boost the market, we hope to see most of the manufacturing SMEs switch to the industrial/enterprise stage. We also aim to invest heavily to boost their production.

Uchechukwu: Where are the biggest potentials for growth in Nigeria now and beyond?

Ukaegbu: Our biggest Potential no doubt is our population, we have a higher percentage to sell to but the level of poverty keeps stalling these potentials making us have zero percentage to sell to most times. Our Potentials is nested to our population and government Policies in the now and beyond ,the government must have good policies, sometimes I feel that Nigeria is a socialist state because of the effects of Government on the economy.

Uchechukwu: Tell us about Keanyi Vendor Platform and the gap its filling?

Ukaegbu: The Keanyi Vendor Platform is one of the best modifications we introduced on the platform because our market keeps growing every single day. The Vendor presence made us to launch the ‘Zero Sales Season’, where a Vendor signs up, put up their products and sell without us taking any percentage, the Zero Sales Season started from November 2019 and will span till Feb 2020.

Uchechukwu: Describe your leadership style, and what Keanyi Represents?

Ukaegbu: My Leadership style is goal oriented. I have my eyes on the goal, and I will do all the reach the goals with the Keanyi team. Being a leader means you have unlearn, learn and relearn. I understand that every single member of Keanyi has goals to live for as a person and I will also put myself in their shoes to make their goals come to reality. I remind myself that leadership is about humility every single day.

Uchechukwu: What are your Source of Resilience?

Ukaegbu: My source of Resilience is drawn from two different Sources;
– Jesus: I might sound religious here because in this Keanyi journey, I have always drawn more strength from prayers and directions. A lot of times as a person, I had loved to shut down and look for a soft work or even travel abroad, but He(Jesus) has been faithful. 

  • My second source of Resilience is the power of time and opportunity: I believe Nigeria at a time when the Rise of SMEs is on a higher magnitude, which calls for a marketplace. I am sure that Keanyi will be the next big thing that happened to the Nigerian Economy
  • My Able Team: At this Point i would like to say that my biggest Source of Resilience is my Team, I want to appreciate Keanyi’s Chief Technology Officer — Mr. Uchechukwu Ajuzieogu. This man been doing a lot for Keanyi , I owe him a lot in this life. I also want appreciate our Chief Operating Officer the beautiful intelligent lady and mother, an event shaker, and business maker — Mrs. Flora Mgbeledeogu, thanks for all the time you have been amazing. I owe you more, you guys has helped me grow, lets keep doing this.

Uchechukwu: An average CEO reads 52 books in a month. What’s your reading Pattern?

Ukaegbu: A lot of books has made me see beyond the norm, the stories and setting might be different but the strengths seems similar. I used to think reading was never my thing, but i read on a daily basis now; print and web. It’s been amazing getting more informed everyday. I read at night most times and I’m currently reading a book by Strivye Masiyiwa.  

Also Read: Coverdor Insurtech Startup Launches Brokerly; Africa’s First Digital Insurance Broker Solution-as-a-service

Uchechukwu: What is your advice for aspiring entrepreneurs and graduate students?

Ukaegbu: Well entrepreneurship is a journey of 20% Idea, and 70% resilience. Ever Imagine watering an apple tree from nursery and watching it grow. As an entrepreneur get people who are better than you, its helping me already, network,build contacts and allies within your niche, work hard and above all listen to your customers — they are the king. 

Graduate is a title that comes with paper, which can only guarantee you job from a company who likes your paper, but a skill is your job which you offer for people who pays for it. While you read books to pass exams and leave the four walls of college, get skilled to overcome the under-utilization of the graduate paper.

B I O G R A P H Y

Ukaegbu Great Jr, is the Founder and CEO of Keanyi an eCommerce consumer goods e-commerce retail platform that connects exclusively local manufacturing sellers with consumers. Ukaegbu has more than 5 years experience in the Graphics, Branding and eCommerce ecosystem

He is also the founder of ABSUVilla. Prior to this role, he took on various senior roles with various organization — PR and Social Media Manager for Today’s 95.1 FM. He is a Nigerian and fluent in several languages including English, Hausa, and Igbo.

Visit Keanyi 

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Meet Mariatheresa S. Kadushi, Founder of M-afya, A Mobile App Providing Health Information In Native Languages In Africa

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Mariatheresa Samson Kadushi is a Tanzanian innovator working to disrupt the public health sector in Africa. She is founder of Mobile afya (M-afya), a “Mobile encyclopedia for public health in Africa” that provide basic health information on-demand as well as personal wellbeing education to parents and youth, with a focus on young women. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, she shares insights on the gap the her Mobile App is filling, the challenges faced by the startup, her plans for its future, and the development of the e-Health ecosystem in Africa. Excerpt.

Alaba: Kindly tell us about M-afya and the gap its filling?

Mariatheresa: Mobile afya (M-afya) is the first USSD application in Africa using internet-free mobile technology to provide basic health information in local and native languages starting with Swahili in Tanzania, East Africa. stands for mobile and Afya means health in Swahili — the most spoken language in Africa.

THE GAP: Digital divide in Africa resulting in health information gap.

For decades there has been a gap between demographics and regions that have access to modern information and communications technology and those that don’t or have only restricted access. It can include services like telephone, television, personal computers and the Internet. Majorly affecting developing countries, this digital divide prevents distribution of essential information and knowledge to those who need it the most.

Health information gap in Tanzania — Radio is the main source of information and news in Tanzanian homes, but only 5% of all broadcasted content is health-related and yet listeners do not have influence or choice of which topics to be covered.

​Internet fails to be an efficient source of information because only 30% of Tanzanians can actively access the web; and in addition, most of the content online is in English, a language spoken by only a minority group of Tanzanians.

This gap results in unnecessary suffering and deaths from easily preventable diseases and health conditions; also it continues family cycles of poverty due to lack of access to information on family planning, resulting in large numbers of unplanned children and high levels of child/teen pregnancy as well as many other negative side effects.

Mobile afya (M-afya) is tackling this problem by making health and wellbeing information accessible.

Alaba: What is the inspiration behind this brand?

Mariatheresa: My work and study with children in poverty / homeless children which led me to discover the gap of information in “Sexual and reproductive health” leading to families having more children than they can take care of, the findings encouraged me to do further research where a bigger gap was then discovered. What keeps us going is the fact that we have the ability to influence informed decisions on health and wellbeing of Africans resulting to life saving impacts.

Alaba: What was your startup capital and how were you able to raise it?

Mariatheresa: Our startup is still in seed funding level. We have been able to raise the funds first and foremost from ourselves (the founding team), after we got support from family and friends. We have done our best to bootstrap for as long as possible and now we are working to secure our first investment round with interested partners from Germany and the United States.

Alaba: What are the challenges, competitions and how are you overcoming them?

Mariatheresa: We have limited competition as we are looking to be first in market with offline USSD application – existing solutions operate online. We believe we will face competition in the near future thus our efforts in preparing competitive strategies to ensure larger market share. Utilizing user data is key in giving us first hand advantage in this strategizing effort.

As a startup the biggest challenges has been working with limited resources but also the long journey of product validation and creating a user centered product which was our main priority.

As a founder I faced challenges in creating structures to support our growing operations but with the advice of experienced mentors I managed to work my way around it. The second challenge was onboarding the right people in the team which involved putting in work to identify what exactly is needed and who is the best fit. l needed people who believed in my vision more than they care for the paycheck as I didn’t have much money to give them anyway, through it all I relied a lot on my gut, how I feel deep in my stomach when I sat next to either a new team member, potential partner, mentor or investor.

Alaba: What’s the future for your brand and what steps are you taking
towards achieving them?

Mariatheresa: Expansion — scale to other countries in sub-Saharan Africa where we have more than 100 million potential users starting with Kenya, Uganda and Congo. In 3 years we are looking at expansion and presence in 5 African countries and in 5 different national languages.

Scaling to web platform and Android and iOS apps, to allow smartphone users to still access our services.

Creating substantial “DATA” to support policy makers, decision makers, influence the education system and build smart digital health products for Africa’s fastest growing tech marketplace

First step we are taking is to finalize our round of funding which will allow us to grow our team and develop more content to scale to other parts of Africa.

Alaba: What’s your view on the development of the e-health ecosystem in Africa?

Mariatheresa: We have seen major developments in healthcare and emergency support. For example my country Tanzania has a “digital health investment road map 2017–2023″ with one of the biggest components being to computerize
primary health care including digitisation of patient records. This allows easier data storage, accessibility of records by other medical departments, referral process leading to better patient care.

Also the nation’s medicine and medical equipment stock “Medical Store Department (MSD)” launched electronic logistics management information system (eLMIS) where drugs and other medical supplies all over the country can be ordered online by hospitals and health centers.

Along these national level initiatives there are hundreds of solutions feeding in to the e-health ecosystem for example MomConnect from South Africa and Wazazi Nipendeni from Tanzania both providing maternal health information to subscribers using free text messages. SMS for life working to eliminate stock out of essential medications in Kenya, Ghana, DRC, Cameroon etc. Zipline using drone technology to deliver blood supply in Rwanda. mPedigree a company working to fight counterfeit medications by checking their authenticity in Ghana and Nigeria and many, many more solutions and services with digital components.

On A Research Project

Still within the African e-health ecosystem there is a large gap in public health especially with access to information focusing on preventive measures. Few stakeholders are working in the area and that’s where we come in with our startup.

Alaba: How do you feel as an African entrepreneur?

Mariatheresa: Working on Mobile afya (M-afya) for nearly three years has been the most difficult experience of my professional life, yet I feel that I’m making a difference, that the work we do is important and necessary. As I’m working on a cause I’m entirely passionate about, I mostly feel fulfilled but now and then I also feel exhausted as it takes a strong will, focus, organisation skills and consistency to keep up with my work’s demanding schedule.

Alaba: What is your advice to aspiring entrepreneurs and investors?

Mariatheresa: To entrepreneur– Persistence is key — the percentage of startups and businesses that fail is very high, this is because not all ideas are good, and not all ideas have a market / not all ideas come when the time is right for them. In general the entrepreneurial journey is challenging, it will require and take everything you have. There will be times when giving up might feel like the most convenient option; if you are not sure, if you are not ready to give it all – then don’t waste your time.

To investors: Foster diversity, equality and fund grassroot solutions that seek to generate new areas of impact. Apply the “think global, act local mentality”for ideas, services and products formed naturally based on problems or needs of certain regions and countries. Also promote diversity around technologies — it doesn’t always have to be high tech and mainstream — give a chance to low and mid tech companies with viable business modes.

Alaba: How do you relax and what books do you read?

MariatheresaRelax : Meditate, travel and taking time off to nature, mountains are my favorite to go place.
Books: Currently reading Becoming by Michele Obama and Wild by Cheryl Strayed

Alaba: Teach us one word in your local language. What is your favourite local dish and holiday spot within Africa?

MariatheresaOne word: “Asante” — thank you

Local dish: “Rice and Fish — Wali na samaki”

Holiday spot: Zanzibar

Also Read: Interview With Oyetola Oduyemi On The END Fund, Impact Philanthropy And Sustainability in Africa

B I O G R A P H Y

Mariatheresa Samson Kadushi is a Tanzanian innovator working to disrupt the public health sector in Africa, she has founded Mobile afya (M-afya), a mobile application developed by medical professionals, doctors, engineers and technology enthusiasts to provide health information in native and local languages in Africa.

She is passionate about disruptive solutions, human centered approaches and public health with a goal of impacting well being of Africans using technology as a transformative medium.

Mariatheresa is a recipient of IVLP — A state fellowship for emerging African leaders under US Department of State. Her alma mater is Kampala International University — ICT (Information, Communications & technology)college. She is also a YALI (Young African Leaders Initiative) alumni.

She is currently utilizing her experiences and skill sets at Moin world Hamburg while exploring partnerships, investment opportunities and potential synergies for her startup.

Visit: Mobile afya (M-afya)

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Interview With Deborah Ogwuche, Founder Of Food Channel Africa

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Deborah Ogwuche is a published author, food blogger, healthy food advocate and the Founder of Food Channel Africa. She is interested in bringing awareness to healthy traditional diets that have been time- proven and tested to benefit humans. In this interview with  Alaba Ayinuola, Deborah shares insights on what inspired her to launch Food Channel Africa, her entrepreneurship journey and how she is promoting African cuisine.  Excerpt.

Alaba: Kindly tell us about Food Channel Africa and the gap it’s filling?

Deborah: Africa is blessed with so many natural resources with a diverse and vibrant young population. As its population is dynamic so also is it’s varied nutritious traditional cuisines which is part of our heritage. Food channel Africa TV is a 24-hour food television channel that will showcase traditional cuisines from all over Nigeria and Africa.

Alaba: What was your start-up capital and how were you able to raise it?

Deborah: Up till this point, we have self-funded the venture. It’s quite challenging because when you have a project this big especially being the first of its kind, there is the usual reluctance but we are dogged in our vision to promote our rich nutrition culture and food to the world. Therefore, we believe that adequate funding to actualise the vision is only a matter of time.

Alaba: What are the challenges, competition and how are you overcoming them?

Deborah: The business landscape in Nigeria has experienced growth in the last few years but is still developing and asa woman, a wife and a mum, it’s certainly challenging trying to balance the roles. It is not easy but it is possible!

Growing up I have always done what people said I couldn’t do or shouldn’t do. For instance, my baby was just 7 months old when I founded Food Channel Africa. I faced a lot of doubt and guilt about caring for my baby and trying to build this vison but thankfully I had a solid support system from my family.

 Also, as a published author and a food blogger, I know that when you start something big like building the first 24-hour television dedicated to food, tourism and culture there are bound to be bottle- necks. What I did first is build capacity in my area of endeavour, put together a dynamic team who understand the vision and get to work. Therefore, my team and I do not see problems as obstacles but as opportunity for learning. And lastly, I never ever give up.

Alaba: Can you tell us more about your entrepreneurship journey and the learning curves?

Deborah: To be honest I thought writing would be my profession which it was for 4 years as a copywriter and published author. But what I also loved being an entrepreneur. While growing up, my parents and people around me were career professionals so I had no one to model after in terms entrepreneurship.

In spite of that, my entrepreneurial journey started at 17 years old when a friend and I bought a popcorn machine and sold popcorn to people on the streets. That was a learning curve for me because as a young girl, I could see how for instance power supply could help businesses thrive. We roasted the popcorns on generators but every profit we made went into fueling the popcorn machine.

Later in the year I got admission into the university and had to pack up the business but the lessons from that time stayed with me.And the lesson was, without proper infrastructure, businesses will continue to struggle. I have since embarked on more than 5 different businesses up till date.

Alaba: What’s the inspiration behind Food Channel Africa and how are you funding it?

Deborah: Food channel Africa came to be out of a mixture of frustration and passion. Frustration and passion because, we were losing our traditional diet history with our diet becoming increasingly unhealthy. No one was paying attention to the fact that Africa wasn’t just rich in its vast natural resources but also in its delicious, healthy and diverse cuisines. I read extensively about the French diet and so many diets from different regions of the world.

My recent travel to France only cemented the fact that African cuisine is one of the world’s healthiest cuisine and needs to be well- represented on the world’s stage. That’s our mission at Food Channel Africa.This is why we are actively seeking for investment to actualise this great vision.

Alaba: How are you promoting our African foods and culture?

Deborah: Food channel Africa is a 24-hour food television channel solely dedicated to promoting African cuisine, culture and tourism. We are developing programs that will not only showcase different traditional meals and how they prepared but also show the deep and rich culture of different African locality, the history behind some of the popular cuisines and the people’s cultural heritage. Food Channel Africa will be informative, educative and entertaining.

It will also boost the food industry in Africa and encourage the youth to pursue culinary education as a career. We would make Michelin stars out of cooks and chefs, people who will in turn take Africa to the world.

Alaba: How do you feel as an African entrepreneur?

Deborah: I feel blessed being an African entrepreneur in this time because of a lot of opportunities opened up to entrepreneurs in the continent. The government and other organization’s drive to open up opportunities to African entrepreneurs especially women in terms of investment is commendable. However, I feel foreign investment shouldn’t be too restrictive to only fin-tech and online ventures.

The food industry and media industry are at a pivotal point as regards development in Nigeria and investors should be encouraged to invest in these areas because of the abounding opportunities and growth in that sector. The media industry is also seeing a lot of development because recently Nigeria converted from the analogue model to digital freeing up a lot of white space for content producers like Food Channel Africa.

Alaba: How can government best support entrepreneurs in Africa?

Deborah: The government’s economic initiatives aimed at empowering entrepreneurs is commendable but more work needs to be done. Incentives and legislation that encourages foreign investments and improve access to credit and loan facilities should be enacted. The government should provide infrastructure and economic enablers like tax incentives for small and medium scale enterprises. A safe and working society is also vital in ensuring business growth and development.

Alaba: What’s your advice for aspiring entrepreneurs and investors in Africa?

Deborah: My advice for aspiring entrepreneurs in Africa is invest in yourself by building capacity in your chosen endeavour. Don’t use short-cuts or fall into the trap of making money quickly. Do your due diligence and don’t lose focus. If you bring a product in to the market for example, stick to the standard or improve don’t cut corner because you want more turn-overs. Integrity in business is priceless and rewarding so have integrity. Don’t settle for less and keep innovating!

My advice to investors is the best time to invest in African businesses is now. Don’t be left out!

Alaba: What inspires you and keeps you going?

Deborah: I believe true success is not how many material wealth you acquire but the number of people you impacted. What keeps me going is knowing that I am directly impacting so many lives and building a legacy that is bigger than me and would outlive me.

Alaba: How do you relax and what books do you read?

Deborah: I relax by reading. I love reading about history and biographies of great men and women. Give me a nice chilled (natural) drink, a snack and a good book and I’m as good as new. Cooking also helps me relax and is therapeutic for me.

Also Read: Meet Sivi Malukisa, The Congolese Entrepreneur Whose Food Startup Is Promoting DRC Cuisine

B I O G R A P H Y

Deborah Ogwuche is the creative director and founder of Food Channel Africa, a 24-hour television channel dedicated to showcasing African cuisines. She is a published author, a food blogger and a healthy food advocate.

Email: [email protected]

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