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Izin Akioya: Multidisciplinary, Marketing Expert and Author

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Izin Akioya is a multidisciplinary, marketing professional, and author. With nearly 20 years’ experience in roles combining marketing communications, business development, strategy, talent management, government relations, and advocacy. Spanning across FMCG, think tank, consulting, advertising and non-profit sectors. In this interview, Alaba Ayinuola engages Izin on her career, businesses, books and passion for the supply chain industry. Excerpts.

Alaba: Could you briefly tell us about your career-path till now?

Izin: I lead Identiti LLC, a full-service marketing practice, serving corporate and personality brands in the US and Nigeria. Our full-service solutions include; product ideation, brand design, e-commerce/content marketing, change communications, government and stakeholder relations, advocacy, business development and corporate events solutions. I also recently launched Ship Africa Global LLC, to support supply chain development in Africa; accelerate access to global markets for indigenous producers on the African continent. Leveraging technology and strategic partnerships; one of which is its partnership with Supply Chain Africa.

My pre-tertiary career commenced about 20 years ago as a sales representative at Park n Shop, now SPAR. One of the few supermarket chains in Lagos, Nigeria at the time. I consequently maintained several part-time jobs while pursuing a full time undergraduate degree in Economics at the University of Lagos. Culminating in a board executive role with a global non-profit (AIESEC) in my graduating year. That early career entry has been the bedrock of my career growth.

I have had the fortune of a multidisciplinary career, working for and consulting with brands in the fast-moving consumer goods, think-tank, consulting and advertising sectors. In technical and operations combination roles. My work in advocacy fortunately contributed to value added tax policy reform in Nigeria. And I look forward to even more global impact anchored on a practice that embeds change-making along every step.

Alaba: How has your purpose, mission and values shaped your journey thus far?

Izin: Purpose often means that one needs to step out of comfort zones, and adapt a lifelong learning approach. For me, finding room for purpose within my profession initially required industry switching, and a whole new learning journey across related disciplines. The curiosity, intent, and commitment to making that move is the basis of my multi-disciplinary capability. It is behind my ability to effectively support a diverse range of clients, with little or no transition gaps.

My accomplishments in advocacy communications are in direct response to a desire to drive “transformative, empathic and sustainable change”. A phrase that has become my life’s mission. Making the industry switch, setting up a change consulting in 2017 despite little references to the practice in Nigeria, has led to new knowledge and expertise that has strengthened my acumen and contributions.

Alaba: At what point did you launch Supply Chain Africa? What is it set to achieve?

Izin: Ship Africa Global LLC was launched in 2020 in response to a gap I witnessed multiplying in product exporting/shipping within Africa, and from Africa to global markets. Today, that gap remains a limitation to the continent’s export potentials. Due to the absence of affordable logistics, low production and value chain capacity and poor market entry knowledge. Our intent is to bridge these gaps, through partnerships, and technology that supports low cost, readily accessible market access. My dream is to see the realization of the AfCTFA’s intent to facilitate trade within the continent. And to engineer global market expression for African made products and brands.

Alaba: You recently launched two great books. Please tell us more about them and what inspired you to write?

Izin: Mum, Find Love Again, was written to provide guidance on personal identity. A pursuit that I find critical for success in the world we live in. In the book, I share transformational life practices interwoven with true life stories. I explore shame culture, ageism and sexism. Show the play of stereotypes on esteem and attainment, and empower the reader with transformative life practices. The second book “Lili” is a collection of poetry, prose and music, celebrating love, reclaiming identity, affirming mastery and the value of solitude.

Both books drive toward the same defining message. “The singular, critical pursuit of personal identity and purpose in alignment with it”. Coming from a culture of shaming, biases and stereotypes. Seeing their impact on my own behavior, behaviors in my society, and the inherent limitations they subconsciously confer. I felt a burden to bring a perspective on life and living that helps people to break out of self-limiting dependencies and belief systems. By teaching purpose and identity. I hope to enable people to embrace their own truths and find attainment in language and paths suited to them, defined by them.

Alaba: This month hosts the International Women’s Day. What are your thoughts on this year’s theme: #BreakTheBias?

Izin: I could easily swap my book title Mum, Find Love Again for #BreakTheBias. The inherent messages are so in sync that I feel opportune to have launched my book this year. Ageism, sexism, inequalities, racism, abuse, are all steeped in biases. Biases remain the leading root cause of non-inclusion, and therefore sit at the heart of a sustainable gender equity strategy. Progress in gender equity, progress in attaining women’s rights over the coming decades will be contingent on how much progress is made. In dismantling unconscious biases and nuances that drive unequal behaviors and societies.

Affirmative action and increased access to education will provide more women with economic security and opportunity. Yet, these women will continue to contend with traditions, lifestyles and faith systems that entrench biases. As we #BreakTheBias, we redefine culture and shape a new meaning of life and living. I am excited to be alive in these times. I am more excited for a future where #BreakTheBias will no longer be necessary.

Izin Akioya: Multidisciplinary, Marketing Expert and Author

Alaba: What was the biggest “no” you heard in your career, and what did you learn from it?

Izin: Being told that I had to stay on “one path” only, in order to have a successful career has definitely been the biggest NO. To do otherwise, I had to commit to a whole new learning journey. I had to learn that necessity of failure, which was something I was not raised to accommodate. Embracing learning became a way to validate my interests. And inadvertently brought me closer to communities and new relationships that helped me to stay on track. 

If you really want to be something, if you put the work behind becoming that something, you soon find the connections and community that enable you to become it. Getting behind one’s dreams is a crucial part of validating, or invalidating them. At best you launch into a new lease of life, at worst, you decide against the idea. Either way, you grow exponentially. This may sometimes mean that one may not “look” successful by the typical signals/markers of attainment. But overtime, I have seen the choice to grow horizontally. Rather than vertically culminate in a solid professional position, options and opportunity.

Alaba: What lasting impact do you hope to have on the industry?

Izin: Three words “transformative, empathic, sustainable change” on people and business.

Alaba: What advice do you have for female executives and entrepreneurs?

Izin: Learning never stops, embrace lifelong learning, get in the forefront of new innovation.

 

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Afripreneur

Darlyn Okojie on entrepreneurship and building Memo Africa

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Darlyn Okojie is a serial entrepreneur and business expansion expert. As the Co-Founder & COO of Memo Africa, Darlyn is responsible for the day to day operation process while building a team to create a Tech solution to People Management. She founded Memo Africa with Ademola Koledoye to create memorable moments across the world. Darlyn Okojie has a past experience of building a business spanning three countries, raising capital and ensuring that the word about the service reaches the right audience. Her First Business, Rugs and Floors Africa, currently operates in three countries, Nigeria, Ghana and Rwanda. In this exclusive interview with Alaba Ayinuola, Darlyn speaks on her entrepreneurship journey and vision is to make Memo Africa the go-to automated system for People Manager: “Future of Memo Africa”. Excerpts.

 

Alaba: To begin, could you briefly tell us about your background?

Darlyn: I spent the early part of my childhood up till my youth in Benin City. I attended all levels of education down to university where I studied Accounting at the University of Benin. My upbringing has made me extremely loyal to my city. After I completed my higher education in 2014, I got my first ever job at Lamudi (Popularly Known as Jumia House) in 2015. While at Lamudi, I worked as a key account manager in an online marketplace firm. A year later, I moved to Cars45 to spearhead the company’s efforts in building and maintaining relationships with strategic partners. Throughout my career, I have been involved in various aspects of people management, even through running Rugs and Floors from January 2020.  At the moment, I’m focused on building Memo Africa.

Alaba: What inspired you to go into entrepreneurship and the problems you plan to solve?

Darlyn: An impactful model to me is my father. I didn’t realise he had that effect on my entrepreneurship life until I looked back on how much I have been able to achieve career-wise. He showed me the only way to gain success is through hard work and dedication. His tenacity and energy in delivering is extraordinary. There have been countless times where I’ve found myself wondering how he gets the energy to go even through obstacles. A quote from a book by Shakespeare, Macbeth, pops into my head whenever I think about my dad. “I am tied to a stake I cannot fly, but bear-like I must fight the cause.”

The life of an entrepreneur is quite fast-paced, there’s no time for breaks and no option to quit, you just have to keep going. It reminds me of something my mum always says, “Person, nor dey Live life go back”. Good or bad we need to keep moving forward in life or in business. I believe my motivation stems from the ability to keep going and building.

Alaba: Memo Africa is one of the startups you co-founded, what sparked the interest? How does the platform work and who are your target audience?

Darlyn: Memo Africa was birthed by various challenges both my co-founder and I faced throughout our work life. From my first job to my current ventures, I have seen how people managers handle welfare related issues in organizations and it inspired me to create a solution that makes their work seamless. We notice that people struggle to remember important dates when it comes to the lives of their employees and it is key because it makes the employees feel valued and appreciated. But dates like birthdays, onboarding and orientation processes, sendforths, and many others dates are lost in transition.

Memo Africa is a simple solution that people managers can use to automate welfare packages to be delivered to both remote and on-site teams across the world. We believe this technology solution will boost business productivity as the team members feel motivated and cared for while saving people managers time to focus on more critical issues.

Alaba: Since you launched, what are the challenges and successes?

Darlyn: It would be best if we start with the positive aspect of the business, the success. At the moment, we have acquired clients both from Nigeria and Ghana, and signed three companies into our system. We have achieved these while facing various economical challenges like Inflation, exchange rate and cross-border payments issues. 

I also noticed that small business owners and other entrepreneurs face these challenges which is why I recently started recording my journey on my Medium account.

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Alaba: What’s the future of people management? Do you see Memo Africa as part of the future?

Darlyn: The future is Tech! The world is evolving to become digital and automated. It is important to ensure that regardless of where people work from, they are treated with the same respect and dignity as they would be if they were working from a traditional office space. Memo Africa is the technology solution born to connect the people in an organization through our automated management system of celebrating them. Staying connected to and creating memorable moments for your team is the best way to keep them motivated while working.

Alaba: Where do you see Memo Africa in the next 5 years in terms of market and expansion? 

Darlyn: We have a large vision set for Memo Africa and are ready to take the action to grow and scale up the Tech StartUp. Currently, our most viable product which is our website  is up and running. We are planning on developing the Mobile App version to increase the accessibility and personalisation of the system. We expect to become the go-to platform for all people’s welfare across Africa and in the world. Our tentacles are set to expand into many African countries. We are open to acquiring more clients, partners and Investors.

Alaba: What fuels your passion and how do you relax?

Darlyn: Aside from the rush of the non-stop cycle of developing businesses, I find myself passionate about finding and implementing solutions to create value in people’s lives. You can find me locked on Netflix to unwind after a busy day or exploring the different countries in the world.

Darlyn Okojie (Photo: Supplied)

Alaba: Lastly, your advice to young women who want to launch into entrepreneurship?

Darlyn: My number one advice to young women who are launching or building their business is that your key to success lies within you. Everything you need to succeed is in you, your thoughts and action shapes your future. As long as you can think it, you can absolutely do it. You need to study and understand your potential, strength, weaknesses and limits. I believe self awareness is the most powerful tool to achieve anything in the world.

I would also say you shouldn’t believe you can only grow & scale up alone, it’s okay to have mentors and role models. These people have walked the mile. All you need to do is find someone who has successfully crossed the path you are hoping to pass. You would be surprised by the number of people ready to guide you or refer you to the next life challenger.

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Afripreneur

Eno Eka: Creating Her Dream Life in Canada

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Eno Eka is a business analyst and consultant based in Calgary, Alberta. An award-winning career coach and keynote speaker who has been recognized for helping more than 100,000 professionals in 90+ countries  kick start their professional careers.  She is a business analysis content developer and course instructor at the University of Manitoba. Eno is the CEO of  Eny Consulting Inc. and the Founder of Business Analysis School.

In 4 years of arriving in Canada, Eno has touched the lives of thousands of immigrants in Canada. She has curated mentorship and coaching programs for immigrants to Canada which have sought her recognition and awards globally. Eno is an embodiment of service as she volunteers with several non-profit organizations to help immigrants to Canada integrate successfully and become gainfully employed.

Eno volunteers as a mentor with Calgary Region Immigrant Employment Council (CRIEC) and sits on the Board of the IIBA Calgary Chapter as Director of Education. She also volunteers at the Calgary Drop-in Centre and Calgary Dream Centre.  She is a Giving Back Sponsor for the Women in Need Society (WINS). Eno Eka is the host of the Livestream Podcast, Fireside Chat With Eno where she shares valuable insights on job search tips and strategies for new immigrants.

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Eno Eka

Her awards and achievements include:

  • Forbes 30 under 30 nominees 2020, Education Category.
  • Alberta Top 30 under 30 recipients 2021.
  • Calgary Top 40 under 40 nominees 2019 and 2020.
  • Universal Women’s Network, Winner 2019 Award for Mentorship.
  • RBC Women of Influence 2020 Award Recipient.
  • Top 100 Black Women to Watch in Canada 2020 Award Recipient.
  • Canada’s Most Powerful Women: Top 100 award Nominee 2020 and 2022.
  • RBC Top 25 Canadian Immigrant Awards Nominee 2020.
  • Alberta Women Entrepreneurs Nominee 2021.
  • Immigrants of Distinction Awards Nominee Finalist 2021.
  • 2020 Tällberg/Eliasson Global Leadership Prize Nominee.
  • Top 8 Female Business Analysis Influencers To Watch in 2021-Globally Recognized & Featured by the IIBA.
  • Women of Impact Awards Nominee 2022.
  • Women Empowerment Awards Nominee 2022.
  • Campaign Ambassador for the United Nations and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.
  • Host of the Global Business Analyst Online Meetup.
  • IIBA Global Corporate Member.
  • IIBA Endorsed Education Provider for all IIBA certifications.
  • Authorized Training Partner for Agile & Scrum through ScrumStudy

 

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Oumnia Boualam is helping African and Arab Women “do business better”

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Moroccan Oumnia Boualam is an experienced Business Growth Expert and the Managing Director at Brussels Global Review (BGR). She helps Arab and African female entrepreneurs and coaches get clarity, build a personal brand and grow a successful business online. Currently, Oumnia oversees several advisory reports on key economic trends in the Middle East and Africa, helping businesses and investors get key information for their decision making process. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola, Oumnia Boualam talks about her corporate experience and her passion for Arab and African female entrepreneurs. Excerpt.

 

Alaba: To begin, could you briefly tell us about yourself and Brussels Global Review? 

Oumnia: Growing up I was very shy and introverted. I never felt comfortable socialising and even dreaded going to school in Morocco (which is where I am from). That completely changed once I moved abroad at 18 to study then work in international sales and marketing. I used to work for a very demanding company selling High Ticket advertising in Emerging Countries. This meant I had to live in various countries (9 in total) and conduct on average 300 meetings per year. While this was an exhausting job, It allowed me to learn how to become adaptable and sociable in the business environment. When the pandemic started I decided to move away from this environment and start building my own business focusing on Sustainable Development and helping Africans and Arabs “do business better”.

I moved to Brussels and co-founded Brussels Global Review. We produce Sustainability reports on the MEA region for an audience of EU decision makers (here in Brussels). In parallel we have 2 signature online programs designed to help African and Arab professionals develop their digital skills, communication and confidence.

Alaba: Could you briefly share some of your experience as a corporate leader, your highs and lows?

Oumnia: Highs: Being able to see how many people I help through my social media content. Lows: Having to deal with toxic corporate culture, lack of support and judgments as a young African, woman entrepreneur.

Alaba: What is your greatest professional accomplishment to date?

Oumnia: I am most proud of the program I have created: The Digital Boss Academy. It’s going to help so many young professionals in Africa and the Middle East to leverage the digital economy to earn more.

Alaba: What are some of the strategies that you believe have helped you grow as a person?

Oumnia: I wouldn’t call it a strategy but more of a personality trait: Curiosity. Being curious and not always following outdated methods and strategies just because that’s what is being said or that’s the way it’s being done. I also strongly believe in learning from life experience rather than having prestigious degrees and that is a crucial skill in Business.

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Alaba: Can you share your thoughts on Gender Inclusion in Africa and the Arab entrepreneurship ecosystem? 

Oumnia: Not enough is being done to change the mindsets. There can be new regulations, new programs and so on. But if the mindsets of both men and women don’t change in terms of really considering equal opportunities for both genders then we will make very slow progress. Women are still expected to have kids and get married before having a career in our society. Some women founders are being asked what will happen to their business once they start a family. We also don’t have enough success stories to inspire and empower women to follow their dreams.

Alaba: Kindly walk us through a typical day as an entrepreneur and how do you relax? 

Oumnia: Every day is different for me because I tend to get bored with routine activities. But one thing remains the same every single day from 06.00am to 09.00am I write and create content. This is the time of the day my brain is most active and also as a natural introvert I feel much more comfortable when things are quiet so I can be deeply focused.

Alaba: What advice would you give to any woman who wants to launch into entrepreneurship? 

Oumnia: Starting a business is not as hard as you think if you’re willing to learn. The hard part is to overcome your fear and mindset blocks. That requires a lot of personal development work and it’s not comfortable to go through it.

 

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