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Mauritius set to turn into Africa’s Education Hub

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Nicolas Goldstein, Co-founder of Talenteum.Africa

Mauritius will soon be the top destination in Africa for ready to work graduates.

As interest for quality advanced education in Africa rises, the expression “advanced education center point” has been tossed around, searching for takers over the landmass. The island of Mauritius is, for some, the leader. Mauritius has reliably been attempting to position itself all things considered a “center”: a junction for tertiary training, drawing in both excellent worldwide scholastic establishments and top-level understudies from everywhere throughout the world. Instruction is as of now a top government need in Mauritius, and the island positions first in UNESCO’s rundown of African nations for tertiary training enrollment.

Add to that it’s a land area only a couple of miles off the east shore of Madagascar, and the island’s social and chronicled connections to Asia and Europe, and Mauritius appears the undeniable decision to play host to another brand of worldwide, moderate, world-class advanced education for the landmass.

Developing quantities of potential understudies on the African mainland are another motivation to support the Mauritian advanced education venture. The interest in quality training in African nations has shot up in the course of recent years, generally attributable to the way that the African working class has significantly increased in size over this time. Spectators have particularly noticed a checked ascent in advanced education action in sub-Saharan Africa, with SADC understudies being the most portable on the planet.

Albeit about portion of these understudies goes to South Africa for studies, the draw of Mauritius has been difficult to disregard throughout the most recent five years. As of now, foundations like Middlesex University, the University of Aberystwyth, and the University of Wolverhampton in the UK have set up Mauritian branch grounds. Their point: offer quality UK degrees to understudies on the African market at reasonable costs. All the more as of late, Uniciti education Hub, the education arm of the Medine Group, has made a space for European organizations to set up in Mauritius. These incorporate the Vatel International Business School of Hotel and Tourism Management, Ecole Centrale de Nantes and SUPInfo International University.

Mauritian foundations have likewise cooperated with global granting bodies to convey European degrees: the Mauritius Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s Business School offers projects granted by the Institutd’Administration des Entreprises de Poitiers, and the Analysis Institute of Management offers an Executive MBA granted by the Universite Paris Dauphine and IAE Paris 1Panthéon-Sorbonne. Nearby understudies at these foundations still far dwarf internationals. The story, however, is diverse for the most up to date player on the Mauritian tertiary instruction scene. African Leadership university (ALU), situated in Beau Plan, has just pulled in 180 understudies from 30 African nations for its first partner.

ALU and other global tertiary instruction establishments in Mauritius have a reasonable order: supply the provincial market with very talented youthful people with transferable skills, energy for business enterprise and a capacity to adjust to the quickly changing requests of the African market. Extreme interest projects incorporate courses in the executives, business, and IT, and pathways to the contracted callings (lawful, bookkeeping and designing). Drug and dentistry projects are presently picking up prominence while projects, for example, cordiality and the travel industry are long-lasting high rankers on the rundown of expert preparing alternatives.

Also Read Prioritizing A Traditionally Underserved Somaliland Population Over Profit – Adan Abbey

In any case, the rivalry is unpleasant for the heaven island. With different nations competing for the position, Mauritius isn’t an obvious choice for Africa’s driving advanced education goal. With more prominent receptiveness with respect to some African nations, there is developing enthusiasm with respect to global easily recognized names to set up on the landmass, like Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh whose College of Engineering as of late set up its first abroad area in Kigali, Rwanda.

Mauritius’ agreeable financial rankings in African lists and the cosmopolitanism of its general public which appears to easily mix African in with Asian and European, are a portion of its key selling focuses. Political security, a populace bilingual in English and French, and its engaging quality to remote speculators still work to support its. At last, be that as it may, what will genuinely decide understudies’ decision of an advanced education goal stays quality. And keeping in mind that banding together with a portion of the huge names on the universal scholarly scene surely increases the value of projects, the substantial characteristic of value that understudies seek to is employability.

Considerably more than having the extravagant degree from the world-presumed college, understudies will in general pick the projects with solid connect to industry and enterprising chance – those which make them the most appealing and valuable hands-on market. What’s more, this is the bearing where all potential advanced education center points, including Mauritius, should now begin outfitting themselves.

Mauritius becoming a top destination in Africa as an Education Hub is one of the many reasons why Talenteum set its headquarters in Mauritius.  At Talenteum we source and recruit the most Talented youth on the continent and have them work remotely for European Companies.

By Nicolas Goldstein, Co-founder of Talenteum.Africa

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Education

Dr. Varun Gupta: Enabling Innovators To Revolutionize Education

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Dr. Varun Gupta is an Educationist and the Education Advisor to the State of African Diaspora. Apart from being Peace Ambassador for UN SUSTAINABLE GOALS, he is the Executive Director at VQENA (an NGO working on the 4th principle of the UNITED NATIONS – Quality Education). Being an Educator and the Vice president OSG, Dr. Varun offers Scholarships with a belief in educating everyone everywhere. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola, he shares more insight on his impacts in the educational ecosystem in Africa. Excerpts.

Alaba: Could you briefly tell us about yourself?

Dr. Varun: I am the Education Advisor to the State of African Diaspora, well known for being humble, dedicated, and God-fearing. Committed to encouraging the global movement that inspires to turn consciousness into action at the Earth Charter Center for Education for Sustainable Development is a few of my objectives. A belief to treat all living beings with respect and consideration prevail to promote the transition to sustainable ways of living is what I preach.

Apart from being Indian Peace Ambassador for United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, I serve on the board of one dozen global firms in the academic sector and have collaborated for years with many international educational organizations to develop specialized programs being run for the uplifting of the African people. I have marked milestones with the pedestals of rich academic and professional experience and a young budding intellectual scholar in the education service industry. Also, Swadeshi’s business and products are what I support falling in nexus with the thought process of our Honorable Prime Minister Narendra Modi Ji.

Alaba: What attracted you to Africa and her educational system? 

Dr. Varun: Africa! Feels like home and I have loved the way Africa has always hosted me. The cost of living in Africa is considerably lower than developed nations. The remuneration packages are quite attractive. For a business person like me as an investor, there is a huge scope of growth as many of the African countries are rich in natural resources.

On the other hand, being an educationist, the good news on education in Africa is that out-of-school numbers have fallen dramatically over the past decade.  The elimination of school fees, increased investment in school infrastructure, and increased teacher recruitment have all contributed to the change. I want to flow with the change and become a part of development is what I would like to add. 

Alaba: In your role as an Education Advisor to the State of African Diaspora, what are your major achievements since your appointment? 

Dr. Varun: As a member and education advisor of the African Diaspora I, ministers and MP together as a part of the constitution work on initiatives of the Parliament in sectors of activities ranging from agriculture, education, healthcare, cultural and human rights, economy and social issues, etc believe towards Africa’s empowerment especially with respect to education, skill development and employment. 

While working on a project named “Cyber future academy” in Africa, I have promoted education through various programmes in the most remote and marginalized areas of Africa. We ensure and strongly believe that the benefits of the Right to Education reach the most deprived children.  

Also, we focus on the most important aspect to boost the spread of education is to spread awareness amongst the parents and the communities and every child needs education.

I also feel proud to announce the latest update (Groundbreaking initiative) – launch of New Diaspora ID on African Liberation Day by the State of the African Diaspora (SOAD) and the Economic Community of the 6th Region (ECO-6). This new ID is to create a new citizenship and common unity for the Afro-descendant members of the African Diaspora. 

With me, the real aim of education is to enable the students to learn HOW TO THINK and not just WHAT TO THINK. They are trained to focus not on the problem but on the solution.

Success of a country depends upon the success of its people and People can succeed only if they are able to get the exposure required to become competitive.

Alaba: How are you enabling innovators to revolutionize education in Africa?

Dr. Varun: First small step already taken includes changing the definition of classroom based training to online sessions and webinars. An approach towards technological innovations (traditional to smart learning environment) using digitalization technology is the path adopted. Here teachers can now engage their students in a more personalized, individual manner rather than the traditional, one-size-fits-all approach.

And to promote education and help the African youth take concrete steps towards their dreams, I, in the capacity of Vice President- On Sky Global is extremely happy to announce 100% Scholarship Scheme for 200 Students, no fee will be charged except for the registration fee and they will be given support & ample guidance to complete our courses and enhance their CV with international qualification. I also believe and am contributing to make Education should be the top development agenda.

Alaba: Mention some of your projects in Africa and its impacts?

Dr. Varun: In May 2014, I volunteered to go to Kigali, Rwanda (East Africa) leaving USA (California) to help a new University and agreed to hold the post as Director and later a year, promoted as Deputy Vice Chancellor (Administration and Finance), as the principal administrative officer of the University. When I was in Africa, I continued to manage the foundation using ICT and communicating to all stakeholders online.

I served as an independent consultant and program content developer (and mostly pro bono) and organized capacity building training programs to governments and private organizations in the area of (a) education, skills training (b) public administration (c) good governance, and (d) leadership. I traveled to many countries to provide various workshops and seminars.

Dr Varun Gupta

Have also developed the School of Postgraduate Studies Vision and Mission (Curriculum Statements, Prospectus and 2 year Strategic plan, 2014 for an university. I conducted training on “Developing Institutional Corporate and Strategic Work Plans”, Rwanda, Uganda & Nigeria, 2015-2016. Also established a presence and promoted programs under scholarship schemes to many nations in the East, West, Central and Southern African region.

I would also like to mention that I had participated and presented an ICT strategic plan in five days Quality Improvement Program of Entrepreneurship Development sponsored by the Ministry of Higher Education in  Kigali, 20th – 24th July 2015. (Rwanda – ICT Plan).

Alaba:
The current global crisis is changing the face of education especially in Africa. What adaptive solution will you offer?

Dr. Varun: The world of education is threatened and is at a juncture. One path leads back to where things were before the COVID-19 crisis, a system that, by and large, has been in place for the last 200 years. The other path concentrates on much more investment in education but also on student wellness while doing whatever can be done to ensure that learning is happening not just through test scores and output but by being more closely connected to the psychological and emotional realities of learners.

Let us aim for the path of wisdom. As the ancient proverb says: the best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The second-best time is now. It’s not too late.

Alaba: What is the future of education in Africa post Covid-19?

Dr. Varun: It is clear that technological innovations such as content management systems (CMS), learning management systems (LMS), and internet use have become a part of the DNA of higher education in Africa. These innovations, like COVID-19, have come to alter teaching and learning pedagogies.

Alaba: What advice would you give African leaders on the importance of education to Africa’s development?

Dr. Varun: The future of education must seek to amplify humanity’s greatest evolutionary advantage: its ability to collaborate flexibly in very large numbers across time and place. Both biology and history teach us that we cannot solve problems and flourish alone and in isolation. Enhancing social cohesion both at the local and global levels must become a core objective of education particularly if, as seems likely, internationalism and global collaboration end up as casualties of the current crisis.

Our education future must include active steps to bring the world together across all forms of the divide—political, cultural, social, and economic. This will require us to once again put ethics and values at the core of the education enterprise.

Also Read: Investing in Africa: Interview with Amb. Prof. Nabhit Kapur, Founder Global Chamber of Business Leaders

Alaba: What is your advice to African youths and entrepreneurs?   

Dr. Varun: A famous proverb quotes – “if the cow gives milk as a healthy food, why ask whether she is black or white”. Our skills should become our identity. We should encourage the youth to keep on learning new skills and implementing the same in their career because we will be known for our skills; the value we will be able to derive to the nation. It will not be about who we are; but it will be then what we are; I think in Africa there are a lot of young entrepreneurs who have great ideas but never get noticed or past the small-scale level.

I think one reason is that they poorly position themselves and the organization. They don’t know how to tell their story. They don’t know how to create their brand. And I think that is also very important.

Dr Varun Gupta

Alaba: Tell us about your favorite destinations in Africa? Why?

Dr. Varun: Oh Yes! With no doubt it’s Rwanda – The Land of Thousand Hills where I lived and spent 3 years. Many beautiful memories associated, I consider it as my second home. I love this country and its people to the core.  After traveling to more than 20 countries in Africa, I find this is the safest country to live and quite easy to do business. The country is very stable with good governance (inspired and touched by the good governance of the His Excellency President Paul Kagame who inherited Rwanda that had been torn apart by Genocide.

Under his leadership, the country is now very stable, prosperous, unified and in large part, reconciled. Social services, such as education, healthcare, housing and livestock are provided to the needy, with no distinction of ethnicity or region of origin. More power to the country and its people. 

There are infinite reasons to love Rwanda. I have plans to spend my retirement in presigitious Rwanda and look forward to visiting them soon. 

Dr. Varun Gupta

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Education

African academics launch initiative to collate COVID-19 data across Africa, call for volunteers

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Dr Vukosi Marivate

Computational epidemiologist and Assistant Professor of Global Health at Boston University Dr Elaine Nsoesie and University of Pretoria Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science Dr Vukosi Marivate have launched an initiative to collate Covid-19 data across Africa and are calling for volunteers to join the project.

The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Africa was reported in Egypt on 14 February. The patient was a Chinese national who had recently arrived in Cairo. As of 27 March, more than 2,400 cases have been reported across Africa. South Africa, Egypt and Algeria have the highest number of cases – 927, 495, and 367 cases, respectively. Most African countries are reporting new cases every day.

Earlier this year, a group of epidemiologists led by Dr. Moritz Kraemer at Oxford University started collating data on the epidemic in China. This effort has grown to include contributions from around the world.

As part of this global effort, Dr Nsoesie and Dr Marivate have put together a team of more than twenty volunteers from across Africa to develop an open dataset of cases as they are reported.

Dr Elaine Nsoesie

The dataset includes patient demographics, date of diagnosis, location, symptoms, travel history, source of information and other necessary information. The location data is at the city, town or village level, and does not include household geographical coordinates so as to preserve individuals’ privacy.

The initiative obtains the data from official sources such as the World Health Organisation, Ministries of Health and Africa CDC, as well as unofficial sources like online news sites.

Also Read: Ensuring that Hunger does not Kill more people than COVID-19 in Africa

These data have many uses. It can help us understand the spread of the SARS-COV-2 in Africa, epidemiological characteristics of cases and how it compares to reports in other parts of the world. The data can also be used in models to study the impact of various interventions, such as social distancing and for making recommendations on resource allocation.

For example this dashboard developed by Dr Marivate and colleagues provides a picture of COVID-19 in South Africa, based on currently available data.

The data collation initiative is calling for more volunteers who can help in collating data. Data collation can be a tedious effort for a few people, but many contributors will make the task easier. Those interested in joining this effort can send an email to [email protected] and also look at Github Repo for additional instructions.

The initiative is also looking to support data collection efforts by Ministries of Health (MoH) in Africa by connecting them with volunteers in Africa. Volunteers with technical and public health expertise can support the collection, organisation, and visualisation of relevant data on MoH websites. The rapid increase in new cases is putting a significant burden on the health ministries and impacting the reporting of data. This is understandable because MoHs are addressing multiple challenges at this time – including tracking, testing, and quarantining cases – while implementing social distancing and other public health measures to control the local epidemics.

“We want to encourage everyone to follow the advice of public health experts and clinicians who are dedicating their time and lives to fighting this pandemic in Africa. Stay safe and healthy,” said Dr Nsoesie and Dr Marivate.

About Dr Elaine Nsoesie and Dr Vukosi Marivate

Elaine Nsoesie is a Computational Epidemiologist and Assistant Professor of Global Health at Boston University. She was born and raised in Cameroon. You can contact her by email at [email protected] or Twitter: @ensoesie.

Vukosi Marivate is the ABSA UP Chair of Data Science and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science, University of Pretoria. He leads the Data Science for Social Impact research group. Vukosi is also a visiting Principal Data Scientist at Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa. You can contact him by email [email protected] or Twitter @vukosi.

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Zimbabwean AI expert and entrepreneur William Sachiti invents open-sourced technology to improve access to education in Africa

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William Sachit taking a class under a tree(Source: Academy of Robotics)

LONDON, United Kingdom, January 31, 2020- Zimbabwean AI expert William Sachiti, CEO of UK-based start-up Academy of Robotics has today published an open-source technology known as ‘Trees of Knowledge‘ to improve access to education through smartphones in Africa. This free-to-develop technology enables a tree or rural landmark to broadcast a wifi connection providing access to a pre-loaded package of educational content. The wifi connection and content comes from a micro-computer moulded into the landmark to protect it from theft or damage.

A community-driven, secure and cost-free solution
Anyone within a roughly 100m radius can then access the content on any mobile device free of charge. Users can also charge their phone by plugging it into the accompanying solar-powered battery charging station. The micro-computers will run on the power equivalent of a small rechargeable battery and can run for years without maintenance. All the user needs is a wifi-enabled device such as a phone, tablet, laptop or computer. There is no need for the phone to be connected to a carrier or any network provider, removing the issue of expensive data charges.

The technology uses a basic computer like the Raspberry Pi computers which have been used in refugee camps in Lebanon by UNICEF as part of its Raspberry Pi for Learning initiative.

A global crisis in education
Globally there are 258 million children out of school and UNESCO‘s new report Education Progress highlights that the problem is particularly acute in Sub-Saharan Africa where the population of primary-school aged children has doubled since 1990 and 1 in 5 children of primary school age are out of school. However, this is also a region witnessing rapid growth in smartphone adoption. Already more than 23% of people in Sub-Saharan Africa have access to a smartphone  –  a number which the GSMA estimates will rise to 39% in the next five years.

Also Read: How Tech Is Enhancing Recruitment: An Interview With Sandy Simagwali, Co-Founder Of Graft Africa

AI expert and serial entrepreneur, William Sachiti, who was educated in Zimbabwe before moving to the UK where he started his first technology company at 19 years old highlights the challenges:

“One of the challenges in providing education through smartphones is that, while many people have access to a basic smartphone of some description, in many areas 3G coverage is still patchy. The data costs are high for most people and in rural areas keeping the phones charged is a problem when there is limited or no electricity. Trees of Knowledge aims to address all these challenges.”

New connection found(Source: Academy of Robotics)

Sachiti adds:
“Every day millions of children walk for hours to get to school in the hope – often a vain hope – that they will find a teacher present at their school. In other cases, children are unable to attend school because they need to take care of the family’s cattle or support their families in other ways.

There is an urgent need to improve access to education for these children. For many children their classes are taught gathered under the shade of a large tree, so ‘Trees of Knowledge’ seemed a natural technical extension of this existing system.”

Last week, UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay noted, “Rethinking tomorrow’s education must be done collectively,”

Sachiti believes that Africa’s burgeoning tech ecosystem can play a vital role in this collective effort commenting:

“While many programmes already exist to fix this problem, it is still not enough. With the growth of the developer community in Africa, I believe we have the opportunity to simply release the technology and let local communities build it themselves. If this technology reaches one or two more children, then I feel it would be a success.”

Technical setup(Source: Academy of Robotics)

The pre-loaded educational content is likely to be largely video-based and would be free to access by anyone at any time. Whilst the system can work with existing educational content packages, ultimately Sachiti hopes that content can also come from local educators.

Further information and instructions for building Trees of Knowledge are available here

Academy of Robotics

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