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Interview with Monica Sekhmet Grant, President of Young Boss Media Inc.

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Monica Sekhmet Grant is the true definition of a Young Boss. She’s been employing workers, building organizations, and producing her own products since her college days. A native of Ypsilanti Michigan but raised in North Augusta South Carolina. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola, Monica shares her entrepreneurship journey, humanitarian initiatives, book launch and the future for Young Boss Media Inc. Excerpt.

Alaba: Could you tell us about Young Boss Media Inc and the gap its filling?

Monica: Young Boss Media Inc. produces media that will empower under-represented communities to gain ownership over their image, voice and economic & political future. Hollywood and broadcast TV are under-represented in gender, age, ethnicity and sexual status. This lack of representation excludes certain groups from obtaining information and resources that have the power to enhance their ability to thrive in a challenging economy. Young Boss Media is on a mission to change that!

Our mission is to produce high-quality content that engages under-represented communities while building a multi-media network dedicated to social impact influencers and to cultivate an online and offline community of innovation, artistry, entrepreneurship and activism.

Alaba: What sparked your interest into the media space and how did you come up with the name?

Monica: By trade I was a community and labor organizer and I’ve always had a passion for economics. Around the age of 10, I started asking “Why are some people rich, while others are poor.”  In America, the Old Boss is the plantation owner, the factory manager, the 9-5 hustle that drained your energy and only gave you enough money to make it back to work the next day. The Old Boss in media was the White Blonde Face with White Blonde stories that did not reflect my community but still dominated what we saw on television.

In 2015, I started producing shows in New York City for another entrepreneur name Bonnie Bruderer. I learned how to build a media network from her. On March 22, 2017, I launched my first talk show under Young Boss Media called Master Plan and the rest is history. We’ve grown into a global media network with 30 producers, hosts and interns producing content around the clock.

Alaba: Since the launch of your platform, what are your achievements? And how do you measure impact?

Monica: The greatest achievement is seeing my people happy. I get calls, texts, and emails everyday saying how powerful our shows are. I strive to make my ancestors happy. If they are pleased, then I am rich.

Alaba: Do you think luck played a role in your success story?

Monica: I got lucky being born in America, that’s about it. I worked for everything else.

Alaba: Did you venture alone? What was the hardest part in the early stages of the company’s growth?

Monica: Young Boss Media has 30 host, producers, and interns now but in the beginning, it was just me. I wanted to partner with people because that’s who I am by nature, but many people proved that they weren’t ready for the long-haul. I don’t believe in the get rich quick hustle. You put in the work every day, doing work that you love to do and then you sleep with a smile. That’sit. The rewards will come.

I learned to do things on my own and to trust my own vision. If I wanted something to be done, it’s up to me to do it. I prayed for the right people to come into my life and eventually they all did and at the right time too. I don’t’ let people stress me. I trust my instinct and if it’s not the right vibe, I keep it moving.

Alaba: How are you navigating the impact of COVID-19 in your industry? Are you post COVID-19 ready?

Monica: I love it, everything is virtual, and everyone finally sees the importance of independent media. It feels like I have been preparing for this moment since the 2008 recession and now that it’s here I’m calm cool and in control of my destiny. God bless all of those impacted negatively by Corona. We must remain safe and follow God.

Alaba: What is your plan for young media entrepreneurs especially the female entrepreneurs in terms of support?

Monica: Young Boss Media Activist Institute is a non-profit organization focused on increasing social justice activism and entrepreneurship via media training. We allow young people of color to produce TV shows, build websites and work behind the scenes of Young Boss Media. I teach our students how to be independent and not look for a job but instead they can be the one to create opportunities for themselves. I don’t baby my students. They must work for their respect. Entrepreneurs don’t take days off. They know that this is not a hobby. My students learn how to build an empire.

I give freely to all of my students regardless of gender or ethnicity but based on who they are I tell them the truth about what to expect in this industry. Women must speak up and not wait to be called on. They must learn to stop doubting themselves and to accept failure as a beautiful part of the process.  Men must learn when to ask for input and not think that everything is about them. Every industry is becoming more women dominate, so they learn how to play well with others by working with me. For all of my students they must know that they can’t fool me. I’ve lived a full life and I know when you’re scamming and scheming.

Alaba: What’s the future for Young Boss Media Inc?

Monica: 24-hour programming of globally produced continent. We are looking for producers and hosts for our African initiative Young Boss Africa. I am also launching my 4th book, Mind Your Business and Prosper on August 17th, 2020. You can order it on YoungBossMedia.com

Alaba: Can you tell us about your humanitarian activities and your new book?

Monica: Humanitarian Activities:

Young Boss Media Activist Institute

Reocomm Foundation

Fight for Fight Campaign

Black Lives Matter

Climate Reality Corps

Organizing a Pan-African Credit Union in the Bronx

Organizing daycare workers, domestic workers, EMS workers and taxi drives into a labor union.

Mind Your Business and Prosper is the blueprint for business success. Written for students transitioning into adulthood, struggling to find their identity but are driven to have their voice heard and make an impact on the world. Monica proves that you don’t have to wait until you’re 50 years old to be successful. Instead, you can live an amazing fulfilled life right now. 

Global Release is August 17, 2020.

Alaba: When are you coming to Africa and where would you love to visit?

Monica: As soon as possible. My DNA traces back to Kenya and Nigeria so those are first on my list. I also love and adore Senegal. I must get to South Africa, Ethiopia, Egypt and Mauritius as well. But honestly,I’ve seen so many beautiful pictures of Africa that I’m ready to spend most of my time country-hopping for the next year or two, recording and documenting my experience.

Alaba: How do you relax and fun fact about you?

Monica: I spend quality with my family, eating laughing and going to the beach. I enjoy talking to my Vice President Raphael about business ideas and him fully understanding my vision. We can’t take the people in our life for granted. They are special.

Fun Fact: I taught myself how to play the saxophone in college.

Also Read: Dr. Olutoyin Oyelade: Casa Foundation, Career and Impact (Biography)

B I O G R A P H Y

Monica Sekhmet Grant is the true definition of a Young Boss. She’s been employing workers, building organizations, and producing her own products since her college days. A native of Ypsilanti Michigan but raised in North Augusta South Carolina, Monica studied business at Delaware State University because she wanted to understand how some people continued to get richer while others remained poor.

After college, Monica moved to New York City and made a career of empowering Black and Brown communities through life coaching and community organizing. “One builds personal power while the other build collective power. Each one is vital and should not be isolated.” Monica is an advocate for economic justice and fairness, for all communities especially her own.  She believes that most men and women of African descent naturally desire to live in safe prosperous communities that support economic growth. 

She has campaigned for workers’ rights with the Fight For $15 Campaign, the Service Employees International Union, and AFSCME International Labor Union. On March 22, 2017, Monica launched what would become the most rewarding project of her life, Young Boss Media. An idea to interview entrepreneurs from underrepresented communities quickly expanded into a television network consisting of young Black producers and hosts that never believed they would one day be on TV. Monica believes in giving people the opportunity to produce media that will uplift their community, even if their community is not hers. 

Monica is currently based in New York City. On June 19, 2020, she announced the release date of her autobiographical, self-help workbook, Mind Your Business and Prosper: A Young Entrepreneur’s Guide to Being Successful. Her goal is to provide mentorship to new entrepreneurs in a down to Earth manner that wasn’t available when she was a student. Mind Your Business and Prosper will launch globally on August 17, 2020.  Young Boss Media is also expanding into Africa with Young Boss Africa, an initiative to highlight innovation among youth on the African continent. 

Visit: YoungBossMedia.com

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Afripreneur

Jusnah Gadi: The Tanzanian Native proving it’s possible to do it all

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Jusnah Gadi, Managing Director of Young Music Boss

Jusnah Gadi a Tanzanian Native, raised in the Netherlands and currently resident in the UK, whose entrepreneurship has landed her in the likes of Forbes, Elle Magazine and the Evening Standard. She is a music business educator and founder of Young Music Boss which is a resource hub focusing on legal and business affairs.

With its tagline ‘Preparing Future Music Bosses’, YMB is an educational channel and network building platform to empower artists and aspiring music executives learning to navigate the business. With a legal background specialising in intellectual property and commercial law, Jusnah Gadi is fast becoming a formidable and much needed force in the music industry.

She is also the Co-founder of the UK’s No.1 Seafood boil brand (Hot n Juicy Shrimp Ldn) which has two operational takeaway branches and recently launched their microwavable sauce pouches ready to take the retail world by storm. HNJ was founded alongside business partner Samantha Pascal and boasts the likes of ZeZe Millz, Krept, Dappy and Ms Bankz among its notable regular customers. 

And as if all of that isn’t enough, Jusnah Gadi also has a full-time corporate job as a Senior Compliance Executive for a FTSE 100 Sports & Entertainment company where she has climbed the ranks in her department leading a team of analysts who ensure the company’s regulatory and legal obligations are upheld. 

 

Alaba: They say ‘don’t try to be a jack of all trades’. Do you believe in this? 

Jusnah: Well the idea is that if you try to be a jack of all trades then you will be a master of none. I believe in the statement to an extent. I do believe that ideally you should focus on that ONE thing and become the go to for it, be EXCELLENT at it and then other doors will open. I don’t entirely subscribe to it though, because I believe that skills are transferable and I believe you can be multiple things at once and be a success at it. 

Alaba: You speak about Tanzania and Africa a lot, particularly as it relates to the music industry – why is that? 

Jusnah: Because Tanzania is my heritage, though I wasn’t born or raised there, I actually visited for the first time in 2003, It is my roots.  I feel a strong sense of responsibility to contribute to the betterment of my country and I think that my way is through Music Business. I see an industry that is RICH with talent but poor in infrastructure. I want to lead in that area and for me that begins with education. In order to develop an ecosystem which makes our music industry more sophisticated I believe the starting point is to ensure creatives and all stake-holders are adequately informed on the various different components that come into play.

I consult various artists teams in Tanzania and when I speak to producers/artists who have no.1 hit songs in East Africa, are dominating charts and streaming platforms with unimaginable numbers, yet struggle for basic needs I am reminded of the overwhelming amount of work there is to be done. If not me, then who? 

Alaba: You also launched the Young Music Boss Awards in the UK (YMBA), tell us about that? 

Jusnah: I am passionate about creating access to the industry but also cultivating and incentivising it, the YMB Awards are an extension of that. The Music Industry, is rich with accolades which celebrates the Artist’s, Producers and sometimes Labels. But rarely the executives behind the scenes who drive it all forward. The YMBA bridges this gap by awarding rising music executives, creatives and entrepreneurs who are the Managers, lawyers, A&Rs, Publicists, Publishers, Stylists, Marketers, Agents etc behind some of the most exciting artists, campaigns and music businesses of our time.

I was that kid who always used to read all the credits in the small print of the CD covers, wondering who those people were and what the different functions meant …now I know they are the people who make the industry revolve and evolve, the YMBA celebrates those individuals. 

Alaba: What about your Food Business, what inspired that? 

Jusnah: It was really an accident. I never planned to be a food entrepreneur. My business partner and I were craving a Seafood boil on our return to London from a trip in Las Vegas and struggled to find one. Eventually, we found one girl who made them from home, tried it and it was not great AT ALL. My business partner then suggested that we could actually do our own, I didn’t entertain the idea. A week or two later she had begun to test a recipe, telling some friends and family and had asked for my thoughts on a logo.

At this stage, I said to myself ‘okay I want in’. But even then, for me it was just an extra cash injection to fund other projects. Within just over a month, what was meant to be just a weekend gig from our home kitchens, word spread across London and demand increased. We then quickly realised that we could now longer safely or legally operate from our home kitchens which led to us obtaining the relevant licences and moving into a commercial kitchen. Two years later, here we are two branches with a product ready for retail. 

Alaba: So what do the next 5 years look like for you? 

Jusnah: Like Greatness. 

 

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Izin Akioya: Multidisciplinary, Marketing Expert and Author

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Izin Akioya is a multidisciplinary, marketing professional, and author. With nearly 20 years’ experience in roles combining marketing communications, business development, strategy, talent management, government relations, and advocacy. Spanning across FMCG, think tank, consulting, advertising and non-profit sectors. In this interview, Alaba Ayinuola engages Izin on her career, businesses, books and passion for the supply chain industry. Excerpts.

Alaba: Could you briefly tell us about your career-path till now?

Izin: I lead Identiti LLC, a full-service marketing practice, serving corporate and personality brands in the US and Nigeria. Our full-service solutions include; product ideation, brand design, e-commerce/content marketing, change communications, government and stakeholder relations, advocacy, business development and corporate events solutions. I also recently launched Ship Africa Global LLC, to support supply chain development in Africa; accelerate access to global markets for indigenous producers on the African continent. Leveraging technology and strategic partnerships; one of which is its partnership with Supply Chain Africa.

My pre-tertiary career commenced about 20 years ago as a sales representative at Park n Shop, now SPAR. One of the few supermarket chains in Lagos, Nigeria at the time. I consequently maintained several part-time jobs while pursuing a full time undergraduate degree in Economics at the University of Lagos. Culminating in a board executive role with a global non-profit (AIESEC) in my graduating year. That early career entry has been the bedrock of my career growth.

I have had the fortune of a multidisciplinary career, working for and consulting with brands in the fast-moving consumer goods, think-tank, consulting and advertising sectors. In technical and operations combination roles. My work in advocacy fortunately contributed to value added tax policy reform in Nigeria. And I look forward to even more global impact anchored on a practice that embeds change-making along every step.

Alaba: How has your purpose, mission and values shaped your journey thus far?

Izin: Purpose often means that one needs to step out of comfort zones, and adapt a lifelong learning approach. For me, finding room for purpose within my profession initially required industry switching, and a whole new learning journey across related disciplines. The curiosity, intent, and commitment to making that move is the basis of my multi-disciplinary capability. It is behind my ability to effectively support a diverse range of clients, with little or no transition gaps.

My accomplishments in advocacy communications are in direct response to a desire to drive “transformative, empathic and sustainable change”. A phrase that has become my life’s mission. Making the industry switch, setting up a change consulting in 2017 despite little references to the practice in Nigeria, has led to new knowledge and expertise that has strengthened my acumen and contributions.

Alaba: At what point did you launch Supply Chain Africa? What is it set to achieve?

Izin: Ship Africa Global LLC was launched in 2020 in response to a gap I witnessed multiplying in product exporting/shipping within Africa, and from Africa to global markets. Today, that gap remains a limitation to the continent’s export potentials. Due to the absence of affordable logistics, low production and value chain capacity and poor market entry knowledge. Our intent is to bridge these gaps, through partnerships, and technology that supports low cost, readily accessible market access. My dream is to see the realization of the AfCTFA’s intent to facilitate trade within the continent. And to engineer global market expression for African made products and brands.

Alaba: You recently launched two great books. Please tell us more about them and what inspired you to write?

Izin: Mum, Find Love Again, was written to provide guidance on personal identity. A pursuit that I find critical for success in the world we live in. In the book, I share transformational life practices interwoven with true life stories. I explore shame culture, ageism and sexism. Show the play of stereotypes on esteem and attainment, and empower the reader with transformative life practices. The second book “Lili” is a collection of poetry, prose and music, celebrating love, reclaiming identity, affirming mastery and the value of solitude.

Both books drive toward the same defining message. “The singular, critical pursuit of personal identity and purpose in alignment with it”. Coming from a culture of shaming, biases and stereotypes. Seeing their impact on my own behavior, behaviors in my society, and the inherent limitations they subconsciously confer. I felt a burden to bring a perspective on life and living that helps people to break out of self-limiting dependencies and belief systems. By teaching purpose and identity. I hope to enable people to embrace their own truths and find attainment in language and paths suited to them, defined by them.

Alaba: This month hosts the International Women’s Day. What are your thoughts on this year’s theme: #BreakTheBias?

Izin: I could easily swap my book title Mum, Find Love Again for #BreakTheBias. The inherent messages are so in sync that I feel opportune to have launched my book this year. Ageism, sexism, inequalities, racism, abuse, are all steeped in biases. Biases remain the leading root cause of non-inclusion, and therefore sit at the heart of a sustainable gender equity strategy. Progress in gender equity, progress in attaining women’s rights over the coming decades will be contingent on how much progress is made. In dismantling unconscious biases and nuances that drive unequal behaviors and societies.

Affirmative action and increased access to education will provide more women with economic security and opportunity. Yet, these women will continue to contend with traditions, lifestyles and faith systems that entrench biases. As we #BreakTheBias, we redefine culture and shape a new meaning of life and living. I am excited to be alive in these times. I am more excited for a future where #BreakTheBias will no longer be necessary.

Izin Akioya: Multidisciplinary, Marketing Expert and Author

Alaba: What was the biggest “no” you heard in your career, and what did you learn from it?

Izin: Being told that I had to stay on “one path” only, in order to have a successful career has definitely been the biggest NO. To do otherwise, I had to commit to a whole new learning journey. I had to learn that necessity of failure, which was something I was not raised to accommodate. Embracing learning became a way to validate my interests. And inadvertently brought me closer to communities and new relationships that helped me to stay on track. 

If you really want to be something, if you put the work behind becoming that something, you soon find the connections and community that enable you to become it. Getting behind one’s dreams is a crucial part of validating, or invalidating them. At best you launch into a new lease of life, at worst, you decide against the idea. Either way, you grow exponentially. This may sometimes mean that one may not “look” successful by the typical signals/markers of attainment. But overtime, I have seen the choice to grow horizontally. Rather than vertically culminate in a solid professional position, options and opportunity.

Alaba: What lasting impact do you hope to have on the industry?

Izin: Three words “transformative, empathic, sustainable change” on people and business.

Alaba: What advice do you have for female executives and entrepreneurs?

Izin: Learning never stops, embrace lifelong learning, get in the forefront of new innovation.

 

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Onyinye Udokporo Speaks on Breaking The Bias

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Onyinye Udokporo is one of the UK’s youngest education experts, dyslexic author, CEO and Founder at Enrich Learning. Onyinye Udokporo speaks with Business Africa Online (BAO) on her thoughts on this year’s international women’s day theme: #BreakingTheBias. Excerpt.

“This year’s international women’s day theme, #BreakingTheBias is a significant one. Why? Because for as long as I can remember, there has always been one, or in some cases, several biases against women. For me personally, being the first-born child and a female (often referred to as ‘Ada’) in an Igbo family is enough for me to have all the odds stacked against me. Luckily my parents are modern, liberal, and progressives who have always wanted me to break the mould. And do what, culturally, is not considered the norm for women and girls.

So, what does #BreakingTheBias mean to me?

Well, it would take more than my allotted word count to explain it all to you. But put simply, #BreakingTheBias means equal access to opportunity for all women and girls irrespective of their colour, creed or circumstance. I was given the same opportunities and more when growing up at home with my three brothers. This access to opportunity empowered me to use my voice to speak up and out about what I believe in. It made me know that as a woman, not only is my voice and opinion important. It is valued and can be used to make a positive difference. I was made to feel like a matriarch and this gave me huge amounts of confidence which I have used to do things many believed would not be possible at a young age.

At the age of 12 I began my entrepreneurial journey providing education services and serving people globally. Now, aged 23, the equal access to opportunity I was given has enabled me to be the CEO of my own company Enrich Learning. Having the privilege to lead from the front means that I can continue to champion initiatives that are designed to help women level up. This year I urge you all to think about how you can empower the women and girls around you to follow their dreams. I urge employers to close the gender pay gap in their institutions. Lastly, and most importantly, I urge all parents and carers to ensure that their daughters are given access to education. An educated woman is an unstoppable woman.

 

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