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Partnerships key to sustainable growth in Africa

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Delegates from across 17 African countries are attending FIDIC-GAMA 2017 – a gathering of global players and partners in the infrastructure and consulting engineering sector. Under the theme “African Partnerships for Sustainable Growth”, the conference seeks to facilitate the creation of innovative, sustainable solutions and business opportunities.
Following the FIDIC-GAMA 2017 Young Professionals Congress held the previous day, Monday, 8 May saw the annual Conference on Infrastructure get under way with Chris Campbell, CEO of CESA, playing programme director. Providing opening remarks was Abe Thela, FIDIC-GAMA 2017 LOC chair; Kofi Asare-Yeboah, GAMA chairman; Moncef Ziani, FIDIC vice president; CESA president Lynne Pretorius; and executive mayor of the City of Cape Town Councillor Patricia de Lille.

African partnerships

The focus during the opening session was on building and strengthening partnerships at all levels, particularly inter- and intra-African partnerships that will see greater collaboration across the continent.

“Amongst the African countries that are members of GAMA, none of them, with the possible exception of South Africa, has the right number and strength of indigenous consulting firms to undertake the multiplicity of infrastructure development projects being executed on the continent,” said Kofi Asare-Yeboah during his keynote address on African Partnerships for Sustainable Growth.

“To their advantage, consulting firms must form intra and inter-regional partnerships to efficiently and effectively use human capital spread over the continent to meet these challenges. Such collaboration would overcome difficulties and complications associated with project identification, funding, and implementation.”

Quality and uniformity

The FIDIC-GAMA Conference provides the opportunity for cross-border collaboration, bringing together consulting engineers from across Africa, providing a forum and networking opportunity for stakeholders working within the built environment. FIDIC recently expanded its African membership base to include Mali and Côte d’Ivoire, the former set to host next year’s conference.

“Partnerships between FIDIC and its member associations, and the regional group GAMA, will ensure quality and uniformity in the practice of consulting engineering and will create a conducive business environment for working within Africa,” said Lynne Pretorius.

She believes that African infrastructure development is critical to social development and economic growth on the continent, pointing to relevant partnerships with similar values as the key to furthering respective strategic objectives.

Building resilient cities

Patricia de Lille concluded the morning keynote session highlighting the impacts of urbanisation and climate change on cities and how engineering solutions were needed in developing and designing resilient infrastructure. De Lille also pointed to cities as key drivers for national economic growth, saying, “If you can grow the economy in our cities, you can grow the economy of your country.”

Key areas for infrastructural development in the City of Cape Town involve the provision of low cost housing, alleviating traffic congestion in the city, and addressing the drought currently gripping the area. As part of the 100 Resilient Cities network, the city looks to collaboration and partnerships with other cities in addressing its challenges.

“That is how we will save our continent,” said De Lille, “Work with the cities, let the cities take the lead and not national government – they just tend to talk, they never walk the talk,” she concluded.

Go to www.fidic-gama2017.org.za for more info on the annual conference. For more info on FIDIC and its members, go to www.fidic.org. FIDIC-GAMA 2017 is currently underway at the CTICC, 7-10 May.

Source:bizcommunity
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Philanthropy

Black Philanthropy Month (BPM) to Kick Off Its 10th Anniversary with 2021 Global Summit Series

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Black Philanthropy Month (BPM) is set to mark its 10th anniversary with the BPM 2021 Global Summit Series, which kicks off August 3, 11:00 am to 3:00 pm EDT, in the U.S. with virtual events continuing in Africa, Brazil, Canada, the Caribbean, and worldwide. The series will culminate on August 31st with Reunity, an international Black women funders power and wellness summit in collaboration with the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at Indiana University.

Featured speakers include Ford Foundation president Darren Walker; CNN political analyst and former member of South Carolina House of Representatives, Bakari Sellers; ABC News senior legal correspondent and co-host of The View, Sunny Hostin; Nobel Peace Laureate and founder of Gbowee Peace Foundation, the Honorable Leymah Gbowee; and faith leader and activist Reverend Naomi Tutu.  

Registration is open. Sign up and see the global keynote speaker line-up at bit.ly/FundBlackSummit2021.

Dr. Jackie Bouvier Copeland, founder of BPM, Reunity, and Women Invested to Save Earth (WISE) Fund says, “Our 10th anniversary is a testament to the tenacity of Black people worldwide. Our resolve is strong to advance our culture of giving and promote fair access to private capital, including philanthropy and venture investment.  Economic justice is the last frontier in the Civil and Human Rights Movement.  We hope the U.S. and the entire world will join the celebration in August and press on to make equity real, starting by signing the  Black Philanthropy Month Global Black Funding Equity Pledge.”

With recognition at the outset from the United Nations as part of its Global Decade for People of African Descent and with proclamations from 30 governmental bodies, BPM has built momentum, having been celebrated by 18 million worldwide across 60 countries since 2011. Valaida Fullwood, creator of The Soul of Philanthropy and a BPM co-architect notes, “BPM has used the power of social media to celebrate the community giving that binds Black culture everywhere, while also calling on the ‘powers that be’ to institute principles and practices that accelerate funding equity.”

The BPM 10th anniversary continues its tradition of using high-impact technology to convene influential Black civic, business, and funding leaders with people from all walks of life to build community and practical action plans for funding equity and impact.  BPM co-architect, Tracey Webb, founder of the pioneering giving circle Black Benefactors, emphasizes that “BPM brings together Black and allied leaders of all backgrounds to remind the world that we too are philanthropists and that our giving traditions matter. We need funders from foundations and corporations to see and fund us too.”

BPM stands out for the diversity of Black people, worldwide, integral to its leadership and summit series. BPM Africa Chair Thelma Ekiyor, founder and chair of Afrigrants Foundation states, “Even though they manifest differently in the Motherland than in our Diaspora, anti-Black racism and neocolonialism on the continent still pose barriers to funding for effective recovery and development in our communities.  We are proud to join with our brothers, sisters, and allies worldwide to celebrate our collective potential and call for Black funding equity.  We are fortunate that the Nobel Peace Laureate, the Honorable Leymah Gbowee, is our BPM Africa keynote speaker to inspire a new vision for 21st century Black funding equity.”

Reunity – the only global Black women’s funders network that inspired BPM and organized its first summit—has played a critical role in advancing the global Black philanthropy movement.  Although not always acknowledged or written into the funding field’s history, Black women have been at the forefront of Black philanthropy as well as leading calls for racial and gender equity and intersectional funding.  Mojubaolu Okome, City University of New York professor and African diaspora giving scholar, asserts “From esusus to the new Black-led venture funds, people of African descent throughout the U.S. and world continue a rich tradition of finance innovation that benefits all of society.” Okome, an original Reunity leader, adds, “As Reunity marks its 20th year of Black women’s innovation for all, we hope the world will join us as we work to build better from the continuing devastation of the COVID era.”  

The Reverend Naomi Tutu, faith leader and activist, has long participated in the summits and will return in 2021 with a session on spiritual wellness for women leaders.  “When a crisis hits, women are often hit first and hardest, as we give everything we have to care for our families, communities, and the world.  Reunity is a time for us to be well, while doing good and to strengthen the global sisterhood as we work to advance humanity in this time of struggle and hope.”

Black Philanthropy Month (BPM) is supported by a growing list of sponsors and partners, including our Signature Charity Partner, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; event talent partner, The b’elle group; Indiana University’s Women’s Philanthropy Institute at The Lilly School of Philanthropy; and global regional chairs, Foundation for Black Communities (Canada); Afrigrants Foundation (Africa); The Puerto Rico Community Foundation (Caribbean); and The Bãobá Fund (Brazil).  The full sponsor and partner roster list will be released in early July. Registration for the BPM 2021 Global Summit Series opens today!

 

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Corporate Citizenship

Nissan South Africa rolls out COVID-19 vaccines to its employees and service providers

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Nissan South Africa employee (Image & release: Nissan South Africa)

Nissan South Africa (NSA), in its bid to help curb the spread of the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in parts of the country, the automotive manufacturer will vaccinate its employees and service providers at its Rosslyn-based plant.

The free vaccination rollout plan is line with the South African Department of Health’s national programme, which aims to achieve population immunity by the end of 2021.

Nissan South Africa’s Country Director Kabelo Rabotho said the automotive manufacturer has always placed people first and continues to be committed to keeping their employees and families safer from the impact of the virus.

“I am pleased that our Nissan South Africa medical station has been registered as a COVID-19 vaccination site, allowing us to vaccinate employees and service providers on-site. Vaccination on-site will follow the same phases as the national government in terms of the age groups permitted to register and be vaccinated over a specific time period,” he said.

To ensure proper storage, handling and administration of approximately 5 000 COVID-19 vaccines, NSA has partnered with Dis-Chem through OHS Care to secure and store the vaccines for us and deliver the required quantities to our plant,” explains Shafick Solomons, NSA Plant Director and COVID-19 Task Team Chairperson.

Brenda Knoetze and mother (Image: Nissan South Africa)

In complying with the South African national vaccination rollout plan, NSA has also applied for access to register interested employees on the Electronic Vaccination Data System (EVDS) for their convenience. This move will allow NSA to register as many employees as possible.

“Our medical team has been trained on how to use and administer the COVID-19 vaccine. In addition to the vaccination rollout, Nissan will continue to support employees with COVID-19 information awareness, providing basic hygiene tools such as face masks and personal hand sanitiser,” confirms Shafick.

“To date, all our COVID-19 countermeasures have been grounded on information from credible resources and partners. To this end, we stand with the Health Ministry in encouraging everyone to get vaccinated when the opportunity arises. Mass vaccination will ensure that we better manage the spread of the virus in our community and country,” concluded Kabelo.

 

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NGOs - SDGs

Kudoti, South African Recycling Platform recognised as one of the global winners of the Nestlé’s 2021 Creating Shared Value Prize

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Kudoti Co-Founder, Matthieu de Gaudemar (Image: Medium)

Kudoti, South African recycling company, was announced in the top five winners of Nestlé 2021 Creating Shared Value (CSV) Prize, for their innovative recycling impact through technology.

The CSV Prize has been running for over 10 years and has identified multiple initiatives for some of today’s most critical environmental and social issues around the world. This year’s competition, conducted in partnership with the non-profit organization, Ashoka, was entitled ‘How do we create a waste-free future?’,  It aimed to identify and award innovative solutions with a system-change approach and a strong growth potential, or a replicable model for other social, cultural or geographical settings.

Kudoti (meaning trash in Zulu) is changing business perspectives of waste into recovered materials through supply chain solutions.  The company’s digital approach helps track recyclable waste in real-time and matching it to demand. The use of technology improves market conditions for waste materials, which drives up recycling behaviour.

Matthieu de Gaudemar, one of the founders of Johannesburg-based Kudoti, expressed gratitude to Nestlé and Ashoka for this CSV initiative. “Businesses and individuals have a concept of waste as waste, when we should have a concept of waste as a resource.  With new business models, we can change the way that waste is viewed.”

De Gaudemar adds that their platform’s success was collective team effort. “It truly takes everyone to address systemic environmental issues. Through this financial investment and technical resources, we will amplify our impact by scaling up our solution in South Africa.”

“When people speak of the future, a world of hover crafts or holograSaint-Francis Tohlangms may come to mind. But at Nestlé, we are seeking a more environmentally futuristic landscape. Through these  Awards, we are on a mission to identify and empower market disruptors in the hope of accelerating a waste-free future”, says Saint-Francis Tohlang, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs Director at Nestlé East and Southern Africa Region (ESAR).

As one of the winners, Kudoti will receive a cash prize of $40 000 and will benefit from Ashoka’s online resources and workshops to explore potential collaboration with Nestlé and a mentoring programme.

“Innovations such as Kudoti not only help reduce waste but also drive consumer behaviour change which is key to achieving a waste free future and takes us closer to a circular economy”, concluded Tohlang.

By Weber Shandwick

 

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