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PharmAccess and Bank of Industry partner with Nigeria’s Delta State to revitalize 25 healthcare facilities

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Delta State in Southern Nigeria has implemented Medical Credit Fund’s innovative Access to Finance Framework as part of its overall renovation of primary health centers throughout the state. It involves utilizing Public-Private Partnership as a method to delivering quality health services at local levels, particularly those in rural or hard to reach areas where a majority of the poor reside. The partnership is between Delta State Government, the Bank of Industry and PharmAccess Group, through its non-profit health fund, Medical Credit Fund, dedicated to health SMEs in Africa.

The scheme supports the outsourcing of defunct and abandoned healthcare facilities to the private sector to revitalize and provide services to the enrollees of the state’s health insurance scheme – especially in the rural areas. In addition, through a matching fund arrangement between the Bank of Industry and the State Government, the private sector players would have access to loans with concessionary interest rates to renovate these facilities. Medical Credit Fund provides partial guarantees to the Lenders on the loans they give to the private sector facilties in addition to business development support to ensure sustainability. The facilities are also quality assured through the adoption of PharmAccess’ SafeCare methodology.

Ms. Njide Ndili the Country Director of PharmAccess Foundation in Nigeria stated that “Medical Credit Fund is focused on developing innovative models to include the private sector to maximize efficiency and access to existing Primary Healthcare Centers anchored on health insurance”. She added that the Access to Finance scheme was very important to make funds available to the private sector partners with Delta State in achieving quality and affordable healthcare for Deltans through the contributory health insurance scheme.

Dr. Olamide Okulaja, Director Advocacy and Communications at PharmAccess in Nigeria said the State displayed a pragmatic approach to solving the issues the plaguing Primary Healthcare levels in the country. He further stated that with less than 5,000 out of over 24,000 Primary health facilities functional in the country, this framework may represent a way of providing a vibrant supply side to the demand-side activities springing up across the country, including the State Health Insurance Schemes and the implementation of the Basic Health Care Provision Fund.

Source: PharmAccess Foundation

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Airbus and Koniku launch a disruptive biotechnology solutions for aviation security operations

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Koniku Inc.-Airbus Aircraft cabin (credit: Airbus)

Toulouse – Airbus and Koniku Inc. have made a significant step forward in the co-development of a solution for aircraft and airport security operations by extending research activities to include biological hazard detection capabilities, as well as chemical and explosive threats. 

The disruptive biotechnology solution, which was originally focused on the contactless and automated detection, tracking and location of chemicals and explosives on-board aircraft and in airports, is now being adapted in light of the COVID-19 crisis to include the identification of biological hazards.

Based on the power of odor detection and quantification found in nature, the technical solution, developed to meet the rigorous operational regulatory requirements of aircraft and airport security operations, uses genetically engineered odorant receptors that produce an alarm signal when they come into contact with the molecular compounds of the hazard or threat that they have been programmed to detect.  

Airbus and Koniku Inc. entered into a cooperation agreement in 2017, leveraging Airbus’ expertise in sensor integration and knowledge of ground and on-board security operations within the aviation and defense industries, as well as Koniku’s biotechnology know-how for automated and scalable volatile organic compound detection (via their Konikore™ platform).

Also Read: Koniku Appoints Dr. Akintoye Akindele To It’s Board of Directors

With in-situ testing planned for Q4 2020, Airbus is demonstrating its ability to accelerate traditional research cycles in a real-time environment in order to develop and bring to market a game-changing, end-to-end, security solution at convincing scale and speed, thereby contributing to the continuous improvement of security in the air transport ecosystem, while increasing operational efficiency and improving passenger experience.

Visit: Airbus

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Low risk of COVID-19 in SA water systems

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There is no evidence that COVID-19 will contaminate water supplies, but the pandemic has highlighted water challenges putting communities’ health at risk, say industry stakeholders.

Panelists participating in a high-level webinar hosted by Messe Muenchen South Africa, organiser of IFAT Africa, said last week that although international scientists were using COVID-19 RNA in sewage to track the prevalence of the virus in communities, there was no evidence that COVID-19 could pose a risk via drinking water. However, the pandemic was highlighting the health risks up to 30% of the South African population faces through lack of access to piped water.

The virus does not survive waste-water treatment plant processing or the treatment for reuse, the panellists said. 

Hennie Pretorius, Industry Manager Water and Waste Water at Endress + Hauser, said: “There have been concerns that this virus could enter the water supply, but the good news is that with proper disinfection of waste water, we should not see the viruses entering rivers, and proper filtration should eliminate any risk in the drinking water supply.”

“There is no evidence of COVID-19 entering water supply systems at this stage, but even if it did, the technology exists to remove such viruses,” said Henk Smit, MD of Vovani Water Products.

Panellists said the pandemic had highlighted the health risks facing those South Africans who do not have access to treated, piped water, however.  Taking tanks of water to underserved areas raised water quality concerns, while shared taps increased communities’ risk of contracting the virus, they noted.

Also Read: COVID-19 Pandemic disrupting our food supply chain – What Next?

Achim Wurster, Chairman of the Water Institute of South Africa (WISA) said: “There could be some risks in the standpipes in poorer communities, where people congregate and touch the tap – and this is where education comes in. But we are not aware of cases of viable virus coming through treatment processes and infecting people.”

Moderator Benoit Le Roy, CEO of Enviro One, noted: “This crisis is highlighting our deficiencies. Nearly half the water we harvest, treat and convey at great cost is wasted, and we are running out of surface water and ground water. So, some of the obvious measures are to reduce, reuse and augment. But we need the political will, and the financial and risk models to implement that. I believe there is sufficient funding, technology, implementation capability and pedigree to give us water security, so that in times like this, when we have a catastrophe on our hands, we don’t exacerbate the health risks the underserved 30% of the population is exposed to.”

The panellists said that effective implementation of the Department of Water and Sanitation’s Water and Sanitation Master Plan for national water security required stepped up effort and improved public-private collaboration.

“This pandemic has brought our inefficiencies to light, and it will hopefully create more opportunities for government and private sector to sit together and find solutions, drive certain projects and get things done faster,” said Smit.

South Africa’s water supply and treatment challenges, solutions and opportunities will come under discussion at IFAT Africa, the leading trade fair for water, sewage, refuse and recycling, at Gallagher Estate in Johannesburg from July 13 to 15, 2021.

To watch the full webinar discussion, click here

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Envisionit Deep AI launches AI solution to help Radiologists and Doctors fight Coronavirus

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Dr. Jaishree Naidoo, CEO and Co-Founder of Envisionit Deep AI

Established in 2019, Envisionit Deep AI is an innovative medical technology company that utilises AI to streamline and improve medical imaging diagnosis for radiologists. They are guided by their vision to positively impact the lives of people in Africa by using revolutionary technology to democratise access to healthcare for all.

Envisionit Deep AI has just launched an online version of RADIFY, their AI solution for radiologists and medical doctors. RADIFY, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, has been offered free of charge to support hospitals, doctors and any other public and private organisation using X-ray in the identification and treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia.

RADIFY was primarily developed to enable radiologists to diagnose more images, more consistently and in less time – whilst prioritising care for people who need it most. One of the biggest challenges facing primary healthcare in South Africa, even before COVID-19, was that they were under resourced and over used. The first line of investigation for pneumonia, and likewise COVID pneumonia, is an X-ray to pick up suspicious features that can be prioritised for further testing.

The volume of X-rays, CT scans and MRI’s generated have always outpaced the number of qualified Radiologists on hand to diagnose and generate patient reporting, creating bottlenecks in the system, often unintentionally leaving urgent cases in the queue for hours on end. RADIFY is capable of labelling 20 different pathologies on X-rays at a rate of 2,000 x-rays per minute, which is 2,000 times faster than a human being!

Also Read: These two Africans are helping businesses and individuals spend less time doing expenses with Xpensi

The chest X-Ray is the first line of investigation for COVID pneumonia because it’s the most readily available, quick and cost-effective imaging tool for the diagnosis of pneumonia – the number one killer of patients with COVID-19.  With the impending demand for testing, known shortage of specialists and the costs associated, it’s vital for healthcare to streamline this process. RADIFY can assist healthcare facilities to detect possible COVID-19 pneumonia cases in order of high, intermediate and low probability.

Dr. Jaishree Naidoo, CEO and Co-Founder: Paediatric radiologist who has served the state health care system for 20 years. Pioneered the paediatric radiology subspecialty after becoming the first South African qualified paediatric radiologist in 2010. Previously, head of paediatric radiology at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg academic hospital and at Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital where she commissioned the first paediatric radiology department.

She has chaired the South African Society of Paediatric Imaging (SASPI), the African Society of Paediatric Imaging (AfSPI), serves on the Executive Council of the World Federation of Paediatric Imaging (WFPI) and African Society of Radiology (ASR)

To test the platform, visit https://radify.ai.

Visit: Envisionit Deep AI

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