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Meet Seipati Mokhuoa – CEO Southern African Women In Leadership (SAWIL)

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Seipati Mokhuoa – CEO Southern African Women In Leadership (SAWIL), Gender Equality Advocate and Strategist. She believes Self-leadership is the foundation of excellence. Her organisation supports and enables seasoned female professionals to realise their true potential irrespective of age, race, religion, background, etc. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola, Seipati talks about her entrepreneurship journey and how she’s leading the transformation and gender equality initiatives across Southern Africa with SAWIL. Excerpt.

Alaba: Could you tell us about South African Women in Leadership (SAWIL) and the gap its filling?

Seipati: SAWIL is an organisation established in 2014 for women in leadership as well as aspirant leaders. The membership composition is made up of supervisory, management, senior leadership and executive roles within the Southern African Leadership framework. We’ve spent the past 5 years doing research and understanding some of the underlying influences, legacy issues and overall lack of appetite to address the vast and incessant gap which exists in terms of skills retention, leadership development, executive coaching, gender parity and equality in the workplace. A global phenomenon we feel we are more than equipped to address through our campaign #SAWILVision2030.

We support and enable seasoned professionals (women) to realise their true potential irrespective of age, race, religion, background – each woman’s contribution still remains critical to the relevance of our ‘present-day’ society and the advancement of the African economy.We also have golf days, where the social (and therapeutic) aspects of golf is discovered. This pastime is a wonderful tool to encourage networking and opens the pathways to endless opportunities.

Alaba: Have you always been entrepreneurial? What sparked your interest into founding SAWIL?

Seipati: Yes, definitely! My late dad was an entrepreneur. I remember back in High school I used to negotiate with him to take some of the stock from his businesses to sell at school and he profusely repudiated no matter how many times I tried. His argument was that it would distract me from my school work. However, in Grade 10 – two of my favorite teachers (Business Management and Biblical Studies) put money together and bought boxes of “champions” sweets and sent me on my entrepreneurial journey. The agreement was that it would be our little secret because they saw and understood the entrepreneurial hunger in me. We did this until Grade 12 (Final Year of High School) – and oh, I passed both subjects with distinctions.

The birth of SAWIL was a mere response to the challenges I faced as a young Woman in Leadership in one of the most untransformed regions of our country post-Apartheid. My first leadership role was at the age of twenty four, 10 years ago. I think it’s safe to say I was one of the Guinea pigs of Leadership transformation in the organization, more specifically in our division. The top performers, even to this date – are white males. Seeing the lack of women in boardrooms as I climbed the corporate ladder opened my eyes to a sad reality with reference to gender parity and equality in the workplace. So, I began my research. As a result, the solutions we offer at SAWIL are both research based and lived experiences.

Alaba: Recently SAWIL Golf was confirmed as the official host of the international women’s golf day representing Africa. How do you feel and can you share more on this?

Seipati: I am obviously ecstatic about this amazing opportunity to showcase and represent our beautiful continent but due to the unfortunate Coronavirus outbreak, we might have to postpone to a later date. The #WomensGolfDay is a global event where women from all walks of life come together to play golf on the same date at over 900 locations worldwide. SAWIL Golf applied to be the Africa host and as God would have it, we were approved.

What makes it even more significant is that the event is usually hosted by Golf clubs. We don’t own a golf course, however, we are the fasted growing women’s social golf club in SA and that makes us stand out. So if there are any investors out there keen on funding Africa’s first female owned golf course – call me?! I have the perfect spot! (Giggles)

Alaba: If any, what challenges have you experienced as a woman in business?

Seipati: To be honest, I haven’t really had it as tough as most African entrepreneurs do. I only left my job in late 2018 and was smart enough to make some good investments which basically take care of my month to month needs. I do however fully understand some of the biggest challenges most entrepreneurs in the continent face such as access to funding and markets hence, we as SAWIL, are in the process of launching a fund to assist women entrepreneurs in the continent to take advantage of the level playing field that is 4IR.

Alaba: What are some of your biggest achievements since you launched SAWIL?

Seipati: Our decision to expand to South African Development Community (SADC) and the warm reception thus far. SAWIL Golf was launched in 2018 but has become a great pillar of the organization. The launch of our research based solution under #SAWILVision2030 and the inaugural launch of Southern African Women In Leadership Top 30 rising stars.

Alaba: Why do you think it’s important that we make equality a priority and what would women bring to the table that you think the world needs now?

Seipati: Research suggests that women in executive positions and on corporate boards can have a positive impact on a company’s performance, that diverse C-suites tend to yield higher margins, bigger profits, and better total return to shareholders.

At SAWIL, we are cognizant of the new wave of leadership that is illuminating the world: they are young, bold, smart, fluid, disruptive, global citizens who have mastered the art of collaboration. As part of the #SAWILVision2030 campaign, rather than using traditional models, we invite women to be part of a new, more collaborative approach to leadership. Rakhi Voria once said “While we may be individually strong, we are collectively powerful.”

In this age of disruption, we cannot continue to sit on the side-lines and wait for someone to invite us to the table. I want to encourage women today to take their power back and start putting their money where their mouth is. There’s a generation of young women rising. They are fearless, intelligent, bold, entrepreneurial and overall global trendsetters. But even these women do not yet fully own their power.

Women continue to be discriminated against and their contributions undervalued, they work more, earn less and have fewer choices about their bodies, livelihood and future than men. But what if we realised our power and influence and used it accordingly and where it matters most?

#SAWILVision2030 is a decade long campaign calling on all women to be at the forefront of creating women empowered workplaces, where equality, diversity and inclusion are not mere conversations in boardrooms full of white males, a few men of colour and a woman here and there. We need to put our money where our mouth is. Be intentional about where you bank, buy your car, house, which medical aid you use, which insurance company you’re with, where you buy your phone(gadgets), clothes, food, which service provider you are with, schools etc.

This is a call for all women to take action. What most companies have done very well is to appoint just enough women into entry level jobs, mid management and somewhat senior management but decision making roles are locked and the glass ceiling only has a few cracks here and there. Ours is to shutter it!!! The time for women to stand together is now.

Alaba: As we celebrate the International Women’s Day 2020, what are your expectations?

Seipati: My expectations are the same as the past decade or longer. We need more women in decision making roles. Corporate or business must step up and make gender parity or equality, diversity and inclusion part of their strategy. Our economies depend on it!

Alaba: What’s the future for SAWIL and what steps are you taking towards achieving it?

Seipati: To be at the forefront of leadership transformation and gender equality initiatives across Southern Africa. We have the strategy and are ready to serve. What we need is for the private sector to open its doors. We will not stop knocking until we see change.

Alaba: How do you feel as an African entrepreneur?

Seipati: I am very excited at the prospects of the future. There is an uprising happening. Young, woke African entrepreneurs are emerging everywhere and they are ready to maximize on the opportunities the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) presents. We are no longer just beneficiaries. We are innovators, disrupters and pioneers!

Alaba: Kindly give a piece of advice for aspiring female leaders reading this.

Seipati: Self-leadership is the foundation of excellence. Take time to invest in yourself. Growth and change are constants on this journey, so practice patience and compassion at all times. Remember, no one is going to hand you anything – get up, grind and get what’s yours. We don’t get what we deserve; we get what we ask for. If there is no seat at the table, create your own table.

Also Read Interview: Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy For Girls Executive Director, Gugulethu Ndebele On Girls And Leadership

B I O G R A P H Y

Seipati Mokhuoa is a seasoned professional with over 10 years’ experience in the Financial Services industry. She built her way up in the banking sector as a teller, multiskilled consultant and builds her way up. And later transitioned to the Insurance sector where the vast majority of her responsibilities involved providing leadership and strategy in terms of the execution of the larger organization’s strategy, sales and productivity, budget control, people management, stakeholder relations (internal and external), operational support, innovation, infrastructure, HR and IT.

In 2018, she took a bold step to change careers and began to position herself to take full advantage of the opportunities presented by 4IR. A passionate strategist and innovator by nature, the digital marketing space appealed to her and presented various opportunities she believes will shape and change the face of marketing in the African continent.

Seipati is a serial and passionate social entrepreneur who believes that the “future of work” is going to unlock greater opportunities for young African entrepreneurs and innovators. Currently pursuing a Masters/Msc in Innovation and Entrepreneurship, she aims to encourage and empower more young people to take entrepreneurship seriously and take advantage of the opportunities that lie ahead.

Photo credit: Tendai Mhlanga

Clothes supplied by: On Point By T Fashion 

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Claire Rutambuka: Showcasing the beauty of diversity

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Claire RUTAMBUKA is an entrepreneur and the creator of Akâna Dolls. Beyond her professional background in International Trade, she has always been passionate about the creation of small and diverse objects. During her early childhood in Rwanda, she was fortunate to have toys and in particular a doll that she cared very much about. It was not only a privilege to have a doll but even more so to have one with her skin color. 

When Claire Rutambuka became a mother years later, she was surprised that she couldn’t easily find such a doll for her children that would showcase the beauty of little black girls. That’s how the idea of creating “Akâna Dolls” came about. Akâna is a word of Rwandan origin that can be translated as “little child”. It’s also a nod to the founder’s origins. 

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The brand was born from a mother’s desire to meet a need; namely, giving all children the opportunity to choose a doll they can relate to and adults an additional choice when it comes to gifting. After the first realization of the “Kaliza” doll, the ambition is to gradually expand the collection to include more skin shades and hair textures, so that every child feels represented.

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Hakeem Abogunde: Building Slash, a solution for Africa B2B market

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Hakeem Abogunde, CEO Slash Africa. SLASH is a decentralized B2B marketplace where buyers and sellers meet to facilitate and protect their transactions. Buyers can place orders and make payment into “Slash Account”. Slash will hold the fund until item(s) is delivered. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online (BAO), Hakeem shares his journey into tech entrepreneurship and how he is building the solution for Africa’s B2B marketplace with Slash. Excerpt.

 

Alaba: To start with, could you share your journey into tech entrepreneurship?

Hakeem: Growing up as a kid, I was the type of guy who loved the internet. I spent most of my time reading, studying, and researching information and news on the internet. Most times, I would be on my computer from night till the next morning; that’s how attached I was to the internet space. 

My journey as a tech entrepreneur started in 2005 when I dropped out of school to pursue my career as an entrepreneur. I joined my sister in her wholesale business at Lagos Island. During this period, I witnessed how people traveled from different parts of Nigeria to Lagos just to purchase products and resell them in their various locations.  This journey was usually stressful, time-consuming, and costly. As an internet expert, I began to think of how I could use the internet to connect with these people and stop them from traveling to Lagos. Unfortunately, the internet wasn’t as popular then, and the only functioning platform available was Nairaland. On Nairaland, I would post some of our products and connect with a few people who were online at that time. 

After a few years in the business, I joined a Multi-Level Marketing company where I led a team of over 500 sales reps. In the Multi-Level Marketing company, we usually went offline to meet with customers, sell our products to them, and get paid based on the sales volume. As an internet expert, to increase my team’s sales volume, I started selling the products online using different social media platforms. However, I later realized that most of these platforms were not efficient. It was then that I decided to build my own e-commerce website. Unfortunately, I didn’t know how to write code then.

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So, I enrolled in a web programming course online, and as a fast learner, in less than 3 months, I was able to build our own e-commerce site from scratch. That actually increased our sales volume by 10 times. I started falling in love with programming and became a freelancer. I worked as a freelancer, developing mobile and web applications for both individuals and companies for 5 years. After, I decided to build a startup.

 

Alaba: You are currently building a solution for Africa’s B2B market through your venture, Slash Africa. Kindly tell us more and the inspiration behind it?

Hakeem: Slash Africa is a decentralized B2B marketplace that connects African retailers with suppliers globally and enables them to carry out secure transactions without any intermediary. 

I got the inspiration when I was working with my sister in her wholesale business. I discovered a huge economic inequality between suppliers and retailers. For instance, one of the biggest problems Nigeria is currently facing is artificial scarcity perpetuated by most suppliers in other to increase the price of their products. This creates a market environment that heavily favors them, leaving retailers at a disadvantage. Having experienced this myself, I think now is the best time to democratize Africa’s wholesale market. This will give retailers access to varieties of quality products at very competitive prices and also save them more money and time.

 

Alaba: What sets Slash Africa apart from other Africa B2B market solutions, and how are you positioning it to become the go-to solution for Africa’s B2B market?

Hakeem: We are the first decentralized marketplace in Africa. We allow both small and big suppliers to list their products and enable direct interaction between suppliers and retailers, allowing them to define their terms and conditions of transactions without an intermediary. This will increase the level of trust and transparency and also gives everyone equal access to the market. Additionally, by operating on a decentralized fulfillment management system, we make our operation faster and minimize cost.

 

Alaba: What have been Slash Africa’s biggest challenges, and how do you overcome them?

Hakeem: Initially, our intention was to build a platform that enables everyone to create their own independent online store in minutes without coding. But we later realized that most suppliers/sellers, after creating their stores, didn’t have the money and skills to promote their stores. As a result, they didn’t make any sales and they would abandon their store. At that point, we decided to convert it to a marketplace, this enables them not just to create their stores but also connects them with potential customers.

 

Alaba: Raising capital has been one of the major challenges entrepreneurs face. How are you currently fundraising?

Hakeem: Raising funds as a local founder is very difficult if you don’t have any investor connections. Most African investors are not helping the situation either. Imagine this: because an African investor doesn’t know you, they won’t want to have anything to do with you. They also like to copy the US model. Technology in Africa is still at a very early stage, and the level of adoption is still very low compared to the US.  Without local experience, getting people to adopt your solution will be very difficult, and this is where local founders have the advantage. So far, we have been funding our project through bootstrapping and support from families and friends.

 

Alaba: Can you tell us your impression of the current entrepreneurship and innovation ecosystem in Africa? How have you seen it transform in the last 5 years?

Hakeem: In the last 5 years, the entrepreneurship and innovation ecosystem in Africa has been growing rapidly. I see a lot of young entrepreneurs solving problems by leveraging modern technologies. But we need to work more in the area of getting people to adopt these solutions, and that is where local expertise is needed.

 

Alaba: What are Slash Africa’s priorities/plans for the year, and where do you see this venture in the next 5 years?

Hakeem: This year, our priorities involve raising funds, strengthening our team, scaling in Nigeria and reaching $1 million in monthly sales. In the next 5 years, we are projecting Slash Africa to hit $200 million in monthly sales and become the largest B2B marketplace in Africa.

 

Alaba: What is your advice to budding entrepreneurs aspiring to go into tech?

Hakeem: My advice to entrepreneurs aspiring to go into tech is to come with the pure intention to solve a problem and not just for the money. Because when you prioritize money, you won’t have the drive to build the business, and eventually, you will fail. Secondly, you also need to love the people you are building the project for because this will also be your driving force.

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Alassane Sakho: The Senegalese Serial Entrepreneur

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Alassane Sakho is a young and brilliant Senegalese entrepreneur, Telecommunications engineer specialized in the Technical-Commercial field, He founded KALIMO GROUP in January 2023, with the ambition to contribute to the development of Senegal. A graduate of ESMT in Dakar, Alassane is passionate about sales, ICT, Mobile Money and real estate. He began his career in 2010 with the Orange Money Senegal and Orange Business Service projects. Later, he joined large real estate companies as a commercial developer, (SIPRES SA, SENEGINDIA, TEYLIUM Group and the company Fimolux, where he held the position of General Manager of the commercial subsidiary. 

Alassane Sakho has also supported many Senegalese and international companies in their development in Senegal, including Wizall Money, ATPS, MOODS, etc. Its vision extends beyond national borders, initially targeting West Africa, with projects planned in Mali, Gambia, Guinea and Côte d’Ivoire, before expanding to other parts of the continent. 

Kalimo is involved in various areas of activity, including real estate development, digital communication, sales, rental and asset management, construction, training, advice and assistance. In addition, the company plans to enter the film industry, with its subsidiary K7film, which will produce short and feature films, animated films, corporate communication, documentaries, etc.

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Apart from his professional activities, Alassane SAKHO is involved in sports, especially football. He coaches youngsters from 8 to 20 years old and has the honour of winning the “Universal Youth Cup” tournament in 2019 in Italy, against big clubs such as Inter Milan, Ajax Amsterdam, Atletico Madrid and AC Milan. Its main objective is to consolidate Kalimo’s presence in Africa and to help foreign companies wishing to set up in Senegal.

Finally, its digital team is ready to help companies or public figures increase their notoriety and visibility on social media. Other areas of activity, such as agribusiness and mass distribution, are currently being explored.

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