Connect with us

NGOs - SDGs

Sustainability Champion Profile: Dr. Jumoke Kassim

Published

on

Dr. Olajumoke Kassim, a Sustainability Consultant, is a horticulturist and a German trained Landscape Architect, from Anhalt University of Applied Sciences, Bernburg, Germany. She holds a B.Sc. degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. She has Professional Garden Design training from the Chelsea College of Arts & Design, University of London, UK and has visited over 28 Theme Parks in Europe, USA & United Arab Emirate. She also attended the School of Media & Communication of the Pan Atlantic University, Lagos, Nigeria for various Media courses which include the Advanced Writing & Reporting Skills, Communicating Ideas through TV, Film and Video and Screen Writing for T.V, Film and Video.

She has attended several management courses and webinars on Climate Change Adaptation practices. She recently bagged a Master Class Certificate in Leadership and Business Management from the London Graduate School and got nominated and awarded an Honorary Doctorate Degree on Environment & Sustainability Honoris Causa by the Commonwealth University. She is a Fellow of the Occupational Safety and Health Association UK, Nigeria Region (FOSHA) and Fellow, Institute of Management Consultants.(FIMC)

She is the Chief Executive Officer for Naturescape Ltd a horticultural and landscape consulting firm with services ranging from design and implementing of residential & estates gardens and parks, installation of hardscapes and garden furniture, maintenance service and lately training. She is an Alumna of Cherie Blair Foundation and a past Team Member of the UNEP-Finance Initiatives & Green House Gas Protocol Technical Working Group (UNEP-FI GHG TWG) that developed the Green House Gas Reporting Standards for Financial Institutions globally.

She is a past member (2016-2017) of IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award Nomination Committees representing the Africa Region. (IFLA – International Federation of Landscape Architects). She is a member of the TWG for the NESREA Extended Producer Responsibility Implementation Plan for E-Waste in Nigeria. She is also a Fellow of the Women Leaders for the World Program 2017 of the Global Women  Leadership Network-GWLN in California, CA, USA. She is the Country Representative for Village Green Global Inc. a United State based sustainable funding organisation supporting sustainable projects.

She has a dynamic 23-years enviropreneur career, spanning, landscape/ecotourism photography, horticultural & environmental management, projects development and management. Sourcing new projects & clients and sustaining clients’ relationship. Managed and successfully executed Social Projects. Ensuring Government and Corporate bodies’ partnership and retaining same, through engagement of key decision makers. She also manages Naturescape Consulting Ltd, a Consulting Firm with focus on Management Training, Project Management, Business Development Consulting, Partner/Sponsor sourcing and Sustainability Consulting through which Green Business Operation is being promoted.

She taught part –time, Sustainability in Landscape Architecture (MLA Class- Masters in Landscape Architecture) at the Department of Architecture at the University of Lagos, Nigeria. She is also a Landscape and Tourism photographer with an impressive archive of images of some parts of the world and Nigeria; places, people and festivals. She has attended 6 National Tourism Festivals across the 6 geographical zones, and has visited 33 states of 37 in Nigeria and 18 countries in 4 Continents of the World. She is currently a Sub Consultant to Burgeap, on an Ogun State Solid Waste Management Feasibility Study project funded by the EU Delegation through AFD- France Development Agency.

She is a multi-tasking & efficient personality with a track record that demonstrates creativity & self-motivation to achieve both personal and corporate goals. She has the goal to promote sustainable living and business operations; efficient management of energy, water and waste through her photography and sustainability works and future projects to mitigate against climate change negative effects.

She is an Alumna of the Fate Foundation having taken the Emerging Entrepreneur course-EEP Class 10. She is a member of the Lions Apex Club, Lagos, PRO-the National Association of Small & Medium Enterprises-NASME-Lagos Chapter. Member, Horticultural Society of Nigeria, Past President, Abuja Horticultural Society of Nigeria, Member, Nigerian Association of Chamber of Commerce, Industries, Mines & Agriculture-NACCIMA-Women’s Wing-NAWORG, Fellow, of the Institute of Management Consultant, West Africa & UK. Member of the Carbon Central Network, Australia, Member, Partnership for Clean Indoor Air, USA/Nigeria, Member, Conservation International, USA. Member, Green House Gas Management Institute, USA, Associate Member- Global Reporting Institute-GRI. Past President, Junior Chamber International, Aso Chapter, Abuja. She is also a Consultant to the Sustainability Policy Group of the Nigerian Economic Summit Group- NESG.

She has a productive 13-years membership of the Junior Chamber International-Nigeria, www.jci.cc with membership in 123 countries around the world – A global leadership and entrepreneurship training organization (NGO) for young people below 40 years, which provided a platform to acquire several training & social project management experiences. She was involved in various projects that impacted on the community, through which she garnered practical experiences of Goal Setting & Getting, Community Relations, Corporate Partners Sourcing, Governmental relationship, Team & Time management and Project Financing. Others are Project Management & Evaluation, Media Relationship and Negotiating-to-win skills.

She is a multi-tasking & efficient personality with a track record that demonstrates creativity & self-motivation to achieve both personal and corporate goals. She has the goal to promote sustainable living and business operations; efficient management of energy, water and waste through her works and future projects to mitigate against climate change negative effects and promote sustainable Cities and Communities.

She is the Founding Executive Director of the EarthShield International Foundation, an environmental NGO with the objective of promoting Sustainable business operation & lifestyle, climate adaptation, creation of green parks & green jobs for young people. One of the social climate adaptation project of the EarthShield  International Foundation is the ‘’Sustainable Decent Public Toilet project’’ using all adaptation products, through which she and her Team plans to empower vulnerable women across Nigeria (starting from Lagos and Ogun States) and inspire adaptation to climate change and consequently develop Sustainable Cities and Communities.

She also runs Afrikasim Ventures, an online lifestyle shopping platform to promote African clothing and accessories, ranging from fabrics- Ankara, Adire, Aso-Oke and Safaris, that are made to order -(into ladies Jackets or Dresses and Shirts & Suits for men, and household accessories), leather works- dyed animal skin; leather carpets, rugs, puffs, etc., Coral beads, Pearls, Head-tie, Aso-Oke, Classy beaded Velvet Turbans, Food, Landscape and Tourism Photographs. Varied percentages of proceeds at Afrikasim goes to support the projects of the EarthShield International Foundation.

Hobbies and Interests include Photography, Information acquisition,Networking, Aerobics, Reading, Writing, Traveling, Food, Fashion, Music, Cooking, Dancing, Golf & Mountaineering.

Please see more details about her work at www.linkedin.com/in/jumoke-kassim-63a6131a/

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

NGOs - SDGs

Adaku Efuribe Joins The Global Fight To End Extreme Poverty In Sub-Saharan African

Published

on

By

UK based Nigerian- Adaku Efuribe has been selected as a 2019 Youth Ambassador for anti-poverty group The ONE Campaign.

Adaku Efuribe will be working in Rotherham to highlight the importance of democratic engagement and campaigning to shape the wider world.

A key focus will be about how local campaigning can make a big difference for international issues, and Adaku will show the importance of international development and how their community can get involved.

Adaku Efuribe said, ‘’I am really excited to begin working as a Youth Ambassador in my local area because I think it is important to end extreme poverty. I also want to show people that it can be easy to campaign on these issues, and that their voice does make a difference!”

Adaku will be working to raise awareness of the fight against extreme poverty, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.

As part of the programme Adaku will be looking to meet with her local MP, Sarah Champion/Rotherham, news outlets, and local community members – and travel to Parliament to take part in large national events.

As well as promoting the positive impact that UK aid has around the world, she will be campaigning around the G7 meeting of government leaders to ask them to take action on extreme poverty.

Adaku will also be working to promote the upcoming replenishment conference Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria, an organisation that’s dedicated to fighting killer diseases.

Romilly Greenhill, UK Director of The ONE Campaign, said: “This year’s Youth Ambassadors are amazing. I know with their energy and passion they will change the world for the better.

“There are some big moments coming up this year – especially the G7 summit and the Global Fund – that could really help the fight against extreme poverty. I know that Adaku Efuribe, alongside all the Youth Ambassadors, will be showing people in Rotherham how important these are.”

This is the sixth year the Youth Ambassador programme has run in the UK.

Previously, Youth Ambassadors have been on lobby days at Parliament and attended the G7 Summit in Germany to call on world leaders to act on extreme poverty.

 

About ONE:

ONE is a campaigning and advocacy organisation of over nine million people taking action to end extreme poverty and preventable disease, particularly in Africa. Not politically partisan, we raise public awareness and press political leaders to combat AIDS and preventable diseases, increase investments in agriculture and nutrition, and demand greater transparency in poverty-fighting programmes. Read more at www.one.org

Continue Reading

NGOs - SDGs

Merck Foundation calls for Applications for “Merck More Than a Mother” Fashion Awards

Published

on

By

Dr. Rasha Kelej, CEO of Merck Foundation and President, Merck More Than a Mother with The First Lady of Zambia, H.E. ESTHER LUNGU during their visit to a village in Central Province, Zambia to meet and empower infertile women

Merck Foundation invites application from all Fashion Designers of Zambia to create a design with the aim to break the stigma around infertility in Zambia and rest of Africa

LUSAKA, Zambia, March, 2019 — Merck Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Merck KGaA Germany announces the Call for Application of “Merck More Than a Mother” Fashion Awards in partnership with H.E. ESTHER LUNGU, The First Lady of Zambia, together with Zambia Fashion Week.

“All Fashion Designers are invited to create a design with the aim to deliver strong and influential messages to empower infertile women and say “No to Infertility Stigma”. Designs ideas can also deliver messages to encourage men to speak openly about their infertility, because 50% of infertility causes are due to male factor”, explained Dr. Rasha Kelej, CEO of Merck Foundation and President of Merck More Than a Mother

Who can apply?

All Fashion Designers from Zambia

How to apply?

The applicants are requested to send the sketches of their creations as an attachment on email: [email protected].

Please mention the subject: Merck Foundation Fashion Awards and add your name, your email and contact number.

Last date of submission:

Entries can be submitted till 30th June 2019.

“No designer has ever, or would ever, say that he or she wanted to make things difficult for women. Fashion industry has already got enough flakes for being superficial. Let’s change this perception and create a meaningful fashion trend aiming to educate our communities that ‘Fertility is a Shared Responsibility’. I love fashion and I strongly believe that we will be able to select a creative design or designs that Men and/or Women would be proud to wear to show their contribution toward breaking the infertility stigma in their communities, villages, cities, across Africa and the rest of the world” emphasized Dr. Rasha Kelej, CEO of Merck Foundation and President of Merck More Than a Mother.

“Designers it’s time to showcase your talent and contribute towards making a difference in society with your unique creations.” Dr. Rasha Kelej added.

The best 10 submissions will be selected by ‘Merck More Than a Mother’ committee. Winners will be granted $500 each to execute their designs and will have an opportunity to exhibit them during the Zambia Fashion Week which will be conducted in Lusaka. Also, the model will get his or her winning outfit.

Merck Foundation plans to scale up this initiative in many more African Countries.

Merck Foundation established a long term partnership with the First Lady of Zambia and Ministry of Health to build healthcare capacity with the aim of improving access to equitable and quality healthcare solutions nationwide.

Merck Foundation has also appointed Her Excellency First Lady of Zambia to be the Ambassador of Merck More Than a Mother campaign to empower infertile women through access to information, health and change of mindset to break the stigma around infertility. Through this campaign, Merck Foundation has trained the first Fertility specialists in Zambia, and will continue to train more candidates to help infertile couples across the country.

Merck Foundation.

Continue Reading

Governance

Why Sustainability Is Crucial To Supply Chain In Financial Institutions | Debo Adeniyi

Published

on

By

Many Financial Institutions (FIs) today, especially the commercial Banks in Nigeria, claim to implement sustainability in operations and all functions of the bank which have been exhibited lately in either their stand-alone sustainability reports or Integrated Reports, but many have so far left a vacuum in linking the implementation to their supply chains. FCMB is one of the very few commercial banks that have identified how important sustainability is to its supply chain. A few years ago, the bank established a yearly “FCMB’s Vendors’ Sustainability Forum-VSF”. It is a yearly stakeholder’s engagement platform where all vendors of the bank are invited, hosted and trained on sustainability practices. The essence is to minimize cost, ensure quality of delivered products and services, improve speed of delivery, and instill health and safety culture, cut down on emissions amongst others.

If Supply Chain Sustainability (SCS) is so important, what does it really mean? SCS is the management of environmental, social and economic impacts, and the encouragement of good governance practices, throughout the lifecycles of goods and services. The objective of SCS is to create, protect and grow long-term environmental, social and economic value for all stakeholders involved in bringing products and services to market- UNGC.

It is important to note that we are now in the era where environmental and social risks translate into reputational risks, credit risks, and financial risks to financial institutions.

For Financial Institutions, many environmental and social impacts do not come from direct operations but from their supply chains. It makes a good business sense for FIs to expand their sustainability efforts to their supply chains, which can be exposed to a number of environmental, social, and governance issues that present significant challenges and opportunities. Considering, for instance, the purchasing power and the number of suppliers that many of these firms have, responsible/sustainable choices can have huge impacts.

Main Sustainability Issues of the FIs Supply Chain

  • Greenhouse gas emissions (GHG): From energy consumption, to transportation of goods, courier services, armored vehicles, employee commutes, and business trips all contribute to GHG emissions.
  • Human rights: Some of the main challenges related to human rights include providing a healthy and safe work environment; guaranteeing a diverse workplace and fostering non-discrimination, preventing harassments etc.
  • Data privacy and security: A vendor’s ability to protect sensitive or personal data to prevent issues such as privacy intrusions, cyber-attacks, and frauds should be a key criterion in the supplier selection process.
  • E-waste and conflict minerals: Electronic scrap components such as CPUs, monitors, printers, etc., contain potentially harmful materials such as lead, cadmium, beryllium, or brominated flame retardants and is often handled in crude, informal, and unsafe ways.
  • Security: Using third-party security personnel introduces an additional component of risk and FIs cannot avoid employing security staff to protect branch offices and guard money that is being transported.
  • Unsustainable practices in facilities and property management: Choosing the wrong suppliers to handle the design and construction of facilities can have significant repercussions on sustainability.

A few practical case studies showing the risks of unsustainable supply chain are:

  1. The case of Ecobank Plc., when fire engulfed its Headquarters in July 2018. A tanker with 33,000 litres of diesel, while trans-loading, had caught fire as a result of some technical fault from the tanker.

The negative impacts measured here are:

  • Service disruption for about 3 hours which resulted into financial loss
  • One of the industrial generators of the banks was damaged,
  • Panic from customers and stakeholders,
  • Increase in carbon footprint of the bank as a result of the excessive fire,
  • Pollution of the drainages with spilled diesel,
  • Wrong perception of lack of safety culture and consciousness etc.

 

  1. A Scaffolding Accident at Unity Bank’s Head Office. This happened during routine maintenance on the Head Office building at 42 Ahmed Onibudo, VI. The maintenance was carried out by a subcontractor to Highpoint Properties Limited. Sets of scaffolds being mounted by the technicians collapsed mid-way, 3 persons fell from the platform sustaining various degrees of injuries.

The negative impacts measured here are:

  • Reputational damage as the impression was that the bank engaged quacks and unqualified contractors to carry out such project
  • Financial loss as the bank had to foot the medical bill of the accident victim
  • Backlash from stakeholders for not putting in place due-diligence to ensure quality, health and safety standards
  • Negative picture painted by the media which is a reputational damage on the bank.

3. Another example is the report from one of the national dailies and online media, Premium Times who reported on its online platform on the 6th of January 2019, with the title “Menace to Society… Who will Save GTBank Customers from their Security Men?” In that report, there were instances where customers gave account of series of extortion, harassment, embarrassments, etc. caused by the security personnel of the Guarantee Trust Bank.

The negative impacts measured here are:

  • Human rights violation and
  • Reputational damage which would have resulted into customer loss and financial loss.

Cases of unsustainable practices by supply chain in financial institutions are numerous and occur every other day. The FIs need to do the needful that will not hamper their operations and smooth running. For financial services, expanding efforts to include their supply chain gives companies a way to further integrate sustainability into their business, minimizing risks and enhancing opportunities that can be derived from supplier relations.

There are several benefits in practicing sustainable supply chain which cut across the triple bottom line (economic, social and environment)

Economic Goals: It helps to reduce cost, improves quality, speed of delivery, flexibility, resource utilization, visibility and innovativeness

Social benefits: Respect of human and workers’ rights, avoid child labour, improve health, safety and working conditions, gender equality, poverty alleviation, etc.

Environmental benefits: Averting Pollution, encouraging environmental friendly products and services, reduction of carbon emission etc.

Common business drivers for supply chain sustainability

This includes:

  • Compliance and regulatory risk
  • License to operate
  • Business continuity
  • Efficiencies and opportunities for innovation
  • An increased ability to manage business risks,
  • Fostering sustainability-driven productivity
  • Cost reduction

 

Some of the risks that are traditionally connected with poor management of the supply chain are damage to reputation, reduced capacity to attract and retain employees, and loss of customers.

Some areas of Supply Chains that Sustainability can be integrated to:

  • Raw material sourcing
  • Manufacturing
  • Packaging
  • Warehousing
  • Logistics (Transportation & Logistics)
  • Retail
  • Consumption

Proactive steps FIs can take to ensure a sustainable supply chain

  • Define sustainability goals.
  • Align with company culture, code of conduct, sustainability strategy and materiality
  • Comply with regulations and voluntary commitments (e.g., certification schemes)
  • Train management and suppliers on market best practices.
  • Sanction suppliers if default on standards.
  • Designate organisational member in charge.
  • Deploy technology to increase accountability, transparency and traceability
  • Disclose their efforts using reporting mechanisms, such as their sustainability reports in-line with GRI standards, SASB, the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) etc.
  • Monitor Suppliers.

 

Conclusion

In order to make supply chain sustainability a more broadly adopted and more thoroughly implemented business practice, we need to continue our efforts to build a better understanding of the business value created, alongside continued implementation of supply chain sustainability practices. The FIs should be well positioned to address sustainability challenges and minimize risks in its supply chains proactively and should look for opportunities to assess direct savings, ensure quality, safety and model avoided costs associated with their supply chain sustainability efforts to advance practices that create value for their businesses, environment as well as for society.

 

Author:

Debo Adeniyi is the Executive Director and the Global Sustainability Leader, at the Centre for Global Solutions and Sustainable Development, (CENGSSUD). He is a seasoned professional, a Corporate Sustainability and Sustainable Development Practitioner, a trained business strategist, innovator with experience and specialties towards working with the private sector in implementing Sustainability in core business strategy, DNA and operations with a strong drive on values, results, creating compelling overarching aspirations and embedding them in the organisation through change management and empowered leadership to create growth, innovation and operational efficiencies.

He can be reached via [email protected], and Full Profile on LINKEDIN

 

Continue Reading

Subscribe via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,714 other subscribers

Ads

Download BAO Brochure

Click on the Image below to download our recently published Magazine

Most Viewed