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Sustainable Tourism Development In Africa: Interview With Thomas Müller, CEO, rainmaker

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Thomas Müller is an entrepreneur with more than 37 years of experience in IT and more than 16 years in digital marketing and technology in the global hospitality and tourism industry. In this exclusive interview, he shares his thoughts with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online on the state of sustainable tourism development in Africa, the role marketing and branding play in facilitating sustainable tourism, the impact of his company, rainmaker in Africa and more. Excerpts.

Alaba: Could you tell us about rainmaker digital and the gap it’s filling?

Thomas: rainmaker has been created as a social enterprise and as such is focused on the impact we can create for destinations, for their hospitality and tourism businesses and people. It is our passion to change the hospitality and tourism sector to keep more tourism spend in the destination through the democratization of technology which we make inclusively and pervasively available to all emerging, small, medium and independent hospitality and tourism businesses. With this, the destination and their hospitality and tourism businesses take back control of their visibility, digital presence, reputation, marketing communication, and distribution. 

Together with Tourism Authorities and Hospitality and Tourism Associations we create a public-private partnership, create local capacity and create a digital transformation initiative, aligned to the UNWTO digital transformation strategy and contributing to the Sustainability Goals.

Alaba: What attracted you to sustainable tourism development in Africa?

Thomas: I have got my “Africa-Virus” already in 1984 when I traveled to Kenya. When I was working with Thomas Cook in the early 2000’s I spend quite some time in Senegal. However, for 10 years I am now living in Namibia and am very active in the Southern African and Pan-African Travel, Tourism, and Hospitality industry. 

I have realized that in the last 5 years the world has dramatically change to the disadvantage of the destinations and their hospitality and tourism businesses and therefore for its people. One major result of tourism is to contribute to the sustainable development of the destination and its people. However, the way things have developed worried me. 

Traditional value chains are no longer sustainable as only 50% of the potential traveler makes use of a high street travel agent and therefore the traditional value chain of a travel agent – wholesale operator – DMC inbound tour operator. At the same time, hundreds of digital platforms have been created. With this a duopoly of the booking holdings and Expedia group has been established, two companies with about 40+ brands now dominating the market. 

At the same time, I saw the hospitality and tourism businesses suffer from the overwhelming complexity and the increasing cost of distribution while at the same tie losing total control of their visibility, reputation, and distribution, becoming ever more dependent. 

The fact that such a platform makes more money with a booking that the hospitality and tourism business in the destination worried me. I simply find this unethical as tourism in that way can’t contribute to a destination sustainable development as it should and could. I also call this market situation “Colonialism 3.0”.

 It has become my passion and vision to change this for the better of the destination, their hospitality and tourism businesses and people. That is when I started rainmaker as a social enterprise or zebra type company in 2016.

Alaba: What are your major achievements and impacts in Africa?

Thomas: We started in 2016 in Namibia and we grew on average by 100% each year only in Namibia. We only started rendering our services in South Africa in late 2018. 

We have achieved some 42 Million 360° virtual tour views for our Namibian customers; those have been gained from 11.7 million Google Searches, 23.1 million views. Looking at the conversion we gained some 321.000 website conversions, 612.000 directions conversions, and 74.000 phone call conversions. Finally, more than N$ 20 Million in direct booking revenue have been achieved for our Namibian customers. Some customers we only grew by 80% but others we grew by 700% of direct revenue. This is a significant achievement towards their profit and sustainability. 

Given that Namibia is a rather small destination with only some 250.000 to 300.000 leisure tourists, where we only have a market share of about 18% in the hospitality and tourism sector, this is a significant achievement and track record, given that for example the official website of the tourism board scores some 700.000 views per year.

It is because of this tangible impact, our 5 Stages of Success and our VISTA Destination Network have been awarded with the prestigious HSMAI (Hospitality Sales & Marketing Association International) in New York in 2018, with the World Tourism Forum Lucern Destination Innovation Start-Up Award in 2018 and with the African Tourism Leadership Forum Award in 2019.

Alaba: How does your organisation measure its impact?

Thomas: The impact we achieve is measured by key performance parameters such as increase in occupancy, an improvement on average daily room rate, migration from online travel and DMC bookings towards direct bookings and the impact on ADR and profit as well as the improvement of the respective online reputation which as a significant impact on direct bookings. Furthermore, the number of searches, views, and conversions from Google based on the overall strategy.

Alaba: What are the practical tips to create links among ecotourism, conservation and community development?

Thomas: When it comes to terms and buzzwords such as ecotourism, sustainable tourism, green tourism, responsible tourism, etc. I am getting quite excited as this is a big topic nowadays in almost every source market to Africa. However, as you can see already on the wording, and the so-called “Greta Thunberg” effect has done a lot to sensitize travelers, it is rather only focused on the ecological site of sustainable and to an extent to the social side of sustainability. 

I am of the opinion that this is short thinking and not taking all aspects into account. To me, there is one major part missing. Economical sustainability. If that can’t be achieved in the first place, there is no basis, no funds and no resources available in a destination and from their hospitality and tourism businesses to properly invest in social and/or economic sustainability and with this helping communities, conservancies and therefore emerging businesses, entrepreneurs and the people in the region to prosper.

As long as 60% to 80% of the profits leaking outside of the destination to global giants, this is a problem we need to fix in order to actually achieve a real sustainable tourism development.

Alaba: Can you say that sustainable destinations have a competitive edge? Why?

Thomas: Yes, they do have a competitive edge as the world and the travelers globally are sensitized on climate change, sustainability, ecotourism, green tourism, etc. and are very careful when selecting their journey. However and as mentioned above, they are not aware that they actually harm a destination and it’s hospitality and tourism businesses when booking through online travel agents and such as their tourism spend doesn’t contribute to the destination, their hospitality, and tourism business and its people as it should and could.

We need to make the traveler aware of the impact it has, especially for developing countries and destinations, their businesses and people when booking directly instead of through platforms.

Alaba: What role does brand and marketing play in facilitating a more sustainable tourism in Africa?

Thomas: It plays a huge role in my perspective. But as mentioned the focus is only on one or two parts being the ecological and social segment of sustainability, often neglecting the at least equally important economical sustainability aspect. There is a growing market of conscious travelers who care. This issue needs to be addressed and the market needs to be made aware.

Alaba: What advice will you give African decision-makers (political and business) on tourism sustainability?

Thomas: Well, from my perspective, destinations need to enable to do businesses with potential travelers to meet their demands, wants and desires while at the same time address the sustainability issue as a holistic topic. 

At first, every hospitality and tourism business in a destination is it a Lodge, Guesthouse, B&B, Guest Farm, Hotel, Activity Provider, Activity Provider, Tour Guide, Car Rental provider, and local Tour Operators need to be digitally enabled. 

This is why we are working with Tourism Authorities, Tourism Associations and the UNWTO to democratize technology, make it pervasively and inclusively available in a public-private partnership and freemium applications. 

It provides a huge competitive advantage for all stakeholders in the destination and makes it seamless and easy for potential travelers to do dream, plan, book and pay for their journey in such an enabled destination.

Alaba: What are the trends to watch in Africa’s tourism ecosystem in 2020?

Thomas: While many countries and destinations such as Ghana, Rwanda, South Africa, and others are on the right track and are very dynamic and progressive with all kinds of innovation, digitization and implementing the basis for the 4th industrial revolution, other countries are a bit behind and need to hurry up in order to gain back control of their visibility, digital presence, reputation, communication and distribution for sustainable tourism development. 

I know that there are many fancy technologies and some vendors talk about the Internet of Things (IoT) automated check-in/checkout and automated room key on the smartphone etc. However, I am of the belief that we first need to get the basics right and enable the destinations and their hospitality and tourism businesses before we even look at all the fancy and cool technology that might work in a Hotel in New York but not necessarily in an i.e. remote Safari Lodge in Africa. It is also the question if travelers even want this.

Alaba: Could you mention some of your favorite destinations in Africa?

Thomas: This is a very difficult question as every country has its beauty and attraction. You can’t really compare them with each other. This is why “Brand Africa” is an important initiative. We are not 54 countries competing against each other, but 54 countries offering the most diverse, interesting and educational experience in all aspects.

Also Read: Lillian Barnard: Tech Enthusiast And First Female Managing Director, Microsoft South Africa

B I O G R A P H Y

Thomas Müller is an entrepreneur with more than 37 years of experience in IT and more than 16 years in digital marketing and technology in the global hospitality and tourism industry. While working for companies such as IBM, (Mannesman Mobilfunk) Vodafone, TUI, Thomas Cook, amongst others, he was part of opening four Hotels, turning around Hotels and other tourism businesses and started rainmaker digital as a social enterprise TravelTech company in Namibia in 2016.

Thomas had the opportunity of working and living in eight countries around the globe and Southern Africa is his home for more than 10 years. It is his passion to democratize technology for African destinations and its hospitality and tourism businesses to keep more tourism spend in the destination for sustainable tourism development. For the extraordinary achievements of the 5 Stages of Success and the VISTA Destination Network, Thomas and rainmaker were honored with several awards in Europe, the USA, and Africa.

Visit rainmaker

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CEO Corner

Investing in Africa: Interview with Amb. Prof. Nabhit Kapur, Founder Global Chamber of Business Leaders

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Amb. Prof. Nabhit Kapur is acclaimed as World most influential Psychologists by the FAAVM-Canada and Founder Global chamber of business leaders. He was nominated as the first non African Ambassador designate to the state of African diaspora (AU 6th region). Recently, he was appointed as the Social impact advisor to Vice President of Liberia. In this exclusive interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, he shared his passion for Africa and current initiatives. Excerpts:

Could you briefly tell us about yourself?

I am the Founder Global chamber of business leaders and the President of PeacfulMind Foundation. Applauded for establishing one of the most successful Mental Health forums in the world called the global Youth Mental Health Forum, a platform for youths to train in psychological first aid. My passion to bring perception about mental health cross continents through my network or business collaborations has lead me to establish various successful ventures like PeacfulMind health innovations in Zimbabwe, PeacfulMind center of happiness, tolerance and leadership in UAE, PeacfulMind center of leadership excellence in Ghana etc with PeacfulMind Foundation as a success platform in Nigeria, Senegal, South Sudan, UK, Canada, South Africa etc.

Through my appointed ambassadors and directors passing a strict protocol, I work at the ground level to create the perception for mental health as a necessary aspect of daily life. My knowledge, skill, commitment, consistency and precision to get things done are one feature hard to find in people. I am privileged to sit on advisory board of many organisations like Reset global people, TAFFD, UCI investments etc.

Tell us more about Peacfulmind Foundation and its impact in Africa? 

PeacfulMind Foundation (PMF) is a global organization registered with United Nations (U.N.) Global Compact based in New Delhi, India. The foundation is present in more than 36 countries across the world. Embarking its vision i.e., “To make psychology a household term”. We have established a wide range of network in Africa and have appointed directors and coordinators who work in teams and conduct wide range of training programs on the vision of the foundation. 

What sparked your interest in Africa?

Moving into Africa was by chance and not circumstantial. I went to receive an award in Mauritius where I met few high profile dignitaries from Africa (Malawi and Kenya). We spoke and they understood my work profile from where I received my first invite to go to Malawi. From that moment onward my interest began into the continent and got connected to many people, professionally and personally. Africa as a continent and people have been really receptive to me, my organisations and my initiatives. 

Amb. Prof. Nabhit Kapur  with president of Zimbabwe

How does your foundation measure its impact?

The work on mental health or brining well-being and happiness through the global chamber of business leaders is measured by the quality and quantity of people who are joining us or willing to join us every month. More members want to represent the core values of Peacfulmind foundation in every area and region. Recently we received 537 applications who want to be a member or director of Peacfulmind. Also our impact is measured by the people’s willingness to work with us volunteering.

How do you feel as the first non African to be appointed the Roving Ambassador to the State of African Diaspora (AU-6th Region)?

Well, honestly at first I was really surprised and happy but then I realised the responsibility given to me with the trust from the prime minister and cabinet. I have started the activities relating to my job profile getting connected to the Diaspora and getting them involved in the continent. Various initiatives so far conducted by me were connecting business organisations that provide mentorship programs to students, nominating ambassadors to the Diaspora who could support its vision, etc. 

Amb. Prof. Nabhit Kapur

What are your achievements since your appointment?

As mentioned above working for the African Diaspora (AU 6th region) is like a huge responsibility. The major achievements since my appointment includes;

– Nomination of 3 ambassadors and advisors on board.

– Providing scholarships to African Diaspora for education.

– Creating a mentorship program for students and young entrepreneurs by connecting them with business houses. 

– Representing the African Diaspora state at various platforms. 

– Building up the Diaspora chamber of commerce and business. 

Kindly share your major projects in Africa?

I have been working on some initiatives through my organisation Peacfulmind Foundation and now through Global chamber of business leaders. We are also setting up a new project “Global Impact Africa”. 

The major projects which I had done and still continuing includes; 

– Mental health and wellness training programs. 

– Connecting various investors to the continent. For example various investment companies where I sit on the board.

– Initiated a project called “power life energy”. Giving way for solar energy in the continent 

– Distributes as many as 3000 scholarships to students willing to go for vocational trainings. 

– In process the project called “global impact Africa”. 

Amb. Prof. Nabhit Kapur speaking with Vice President of Liberia

What are the challenges and how are you overcoming them?

Obviously whatever new comes always has its hurdles and nothing comes easy in life. Even taking the first step is always a challenge but as soon you get in the process the path itself becomes clear. The challenges I faced was new continent entry and no guidance as to what to go for. I started exploring, researching and reaching out to people, building my own network and my own team. Communication and outreach has been a great help and as my network started to develop I moved deeper into Africa. 

Also Read: Interview: Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy For Girls Executive Director, Gugulethu Ndebele On Girls And Leadership

How are you telling the African story in the Diaspora?

As the recently appointed non African or not even from the African decent I have a view of the continent from a third angle. My visit to Africa started with Malawi and then from there it kept on growing. I must say it’s a continent that is underestimated, overly dominated and underutilisation of the youth’s energy. Africa has the largest number of youths and huge amount of potentials to invest in entrepreneurship, startups and youth resources. 

What is your view on governance in Africa? Any advice?

Any government sustain on the policies it frames upon which the people or a country is governed. It’s a very mixed view on the governance style in Africa. According to me as much as I have studied, the style should be changed and more young faces need to come forward as I mentioned Africa is the land of the young. Leaders should believe and focus more on nurturance of the continent and less of domination. 

Prof Nabhit Kapur felicitating the Prime minister of Uganda

As the President of the Global Chamber of Business Leaders, how are you connecting African business leader to the world?

Global Chamber of Business leaders is a platform we are creating to connect various business organisations and established business entities with young entrepreneurs. Through the chamber we are also engaging investors to serious business opportunities towards Africa and also giving them a different outlook towards Africa. The global chamber has a diverse and wide group of advisors on its board which gives a diversified and a global outlook to the chamber. 

What is your advice to African youths and entrepreneurs?

Entrepreneurship is not a one day game. We need to be more thick skin and think out of the box. Leadership skills and ability to survive on hope is another true feature of an entrepreneur.

Visit Peacfulmind Foundation

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CEO Corner

Interview With Amadou Diallo, CEO of DHL Global Forwarding Middle East & Africa

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Amadou Diallo is CEO of DHL Global Forwarding Middle East & Africa based in Dubai. A role he is well-placed to perform with his experience in logistics and international leadership. He is responsible for the performance and long-term strategic development of the unit. In this exclusive interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, the DHL Global Forwarding Middle East & Africa CEO speaks on the DHL’s experience in the African market, current state of the logistics sector, the biggest potentials for growth in Africa and outlined his company’s future plans in Africa. Excerpt.

Alaba: Kindly share your set goals when assuming as the CEO, and how much progress has been made?

Amadou: I’m a strong believer that there is a strong correlation between how well the organization does and how well we treat our people. In this regard, I’m very fortunate to work alongside talented individuals who are not just skilled at what they do, they do it with the utmost commitment, in the interest of our customers. I’ve taken on many roles within the organization, in various regions over the years, and I believe my diverse experience has given me a refreshing perspective to run the team here, and most importantly, I’m happy to contribute back to the community I was born and raised in. I’m proud to be African and I think Africa has a lot more to offer to the world.

My aspiration is to make our business in Africa the most attractive to talents in our industry, the most customer centric logistics company, the most efficient and profitable region in our division as well as the most socially responsible team within the next three years. We want to become the champions of logistics within our division as well as in the market.

Alaba: Can you provide some insights into DHL historical presence in Africa?

Amadou: DHL first started in Africa in 1865 under Hull Blyth in Angola,  and has since built up an extensive network of offices offering end-to-end logistics services throughout the continent. It now has representation in every African country often with multiple business units covering Express shipments, Ocean Freight, Road Freight, Air & Supply Chain services.

We have over the years, built up a strong brand, and I expect us to maintain this as we operate in the diverse markets in Africa with the best of local talent who are sensitive to cultural nuances and local business practices.

Alaba: What has been DHL’s experience in the market in terms of its challenges, competition and successes?

Amadou: Having provided world-class freight services in Africa for the past few decades, we have seen the rapid economic growth and development in the region, and the opportunities which businesses here can tap into. With our long-term expertise and with the support of our extensive, global network, we at DHL Global Forwarding work every day towards offering our clients the best possible tailor-made solutions, which meet their evolving business needs. We remain committed to supporting them with timely, agile, and cost-effective global freight connections that allow them to reach their fullest potential.

As one of the fastest-growing markets for DHL Global Forwarding, Africa remains very attractive for many of our customers. Therefore, staying close to the market and being adaptable and responsive to customer needs are part of our fundamental principles. In order to provide the best to customers, DHL Global Forwarding relies not just on world-class facilities in Africa, but also places emphasis on our robust workforce in the region to build on its successful legacy.

Beyond adaptability, we are also cultural experts in our field of business – we operate in each diverse market in Africa with the best of local talents who are sensitive to cultural nuances and local business practices. We are heartened that our clients also see the value we bring to their table – in 2019; we were voted Africa’s International Freight Forwarder of the Year for the fifth consecutive year by readers of STAT Times, a leading international air freight publication.

Having said that, we also recognize that there remain challenges to navigate, given that the continent continues to see the lack of infrastructural support and connectivity. Nonetheless, we remain optimistic about the region’s prospects and are well-equipped to deal with challenges, and see them as opportunities to tap into. With our targeted investments and strategic initiatives, we are focused on megatrends in logistics, such as e-commerce, and are developing promising growth prospects.

Our approach is clear: We think global and act local. That requires us to have a global and long term view, while at the same time operating within local or regional constraints or cultural restrictions, to best maximize the situation. In order to achieve that, we have built a strong local team of experts in each of the countries in Africa – those who understand the nuances and can help us navigate through these challenges.

Alaba: In terms of reputation and performance, where would you like to see DHL Middle East and Africa in 3-5 yrs?

Amadou: Having been in the region for the last few decades, DHL has already established itself as a trusted partner to our customers, and I am sure we will maintain market leader position because of the value we bring to our customers.

In the next few years, we will also continue to invest in meeting growing market demand, amplifying the region’s transport infrastructure, and applying global innovations to the Africa context, with an especial focus on partnerships that will bolster our capabilities to deliver best results. We will also look into setting up more competency centers for verticals such as automotive, life sciences and perishables for example, to ensure we put in place highly specialized teams that know the unique contexts which customers in these sectors navigate, leading to winning partnerships. Wherever possible, we look into new or existing markets for us to enter or grow, to best enjoy first-mover advantage and anticipate our customers’ needs.

Digitalization will remain a key focus because there is potential for digital technologies to drive significant productivity improvements, transform customer service and create new revenue streams. We are looking forward to bringing customer benefits through an enhanced shipping experience and improved access to information.

On the people front, I hope to attract the brightest people to join our team, and to retain the talent we currently have. Diversity is celebrated in our organization and I am going to continue pushing this agenda – we will work toward having more women in leadership, and run programs that groom young talent for key positions in the company.

DHL is and will remain The Logistics Company for Africa.

Alaba: How would you evaluate the current state of the logistics sector in Africa?

Amadou: I see the logistics sector as the best enabler for Africa’s transformation towards a manufacturing platform for the world and we are seeing various forms of changes, similar to what we witnessed in Asia ten years ago. According to the World Economic Forum, the continent’s growth is projected to reach 4% in 2019 and 4.1% in 2020. An enabler of trade, logistics will play an instrumental role to facilitate the movement of goods intra-regionally and in/out of Africa.

However, despite the optimistic outlook thanks to rising urbanization and a growing middle class, the region’s growth opportunities are tapered by political risk factors, infrastructure and a fragmented market typical of an emerging region where each country has its own unique economic and cultural environment. While there is limited influence we can have on government policies on trade, logistics providers should work with customers to help them navigate through complex customs regulations and be accountable for customers’ entire end-to-end operations.

We can expect more competition among logistics providers in this region, but I’m confident that DHL, with our global expertise and local talent, will best value add and meet our customers’ expectations. 

Alaba: Where are the biggest potentials for growth in Africa now and beyond?

Amadou: Africa is one of our network’s fastest growing markets. The business and socio-political climate in the region has definitely stabilized as compared to what we have experienced in the last few years – that bodes well for the economy as a whole. For example, Egypt, Nigeria, Ethiopia and Morocco are heavily working to improve on policies as well as infrastructure towards becoming important logistics hubs.

According to the World Economic Forum, the continent’s growth is projected to reach 4% in 2019 and 4.1% in 2020. With the region’s economic landscape growth attributed to a young urbanizing population, we are anticipating that digitization, digitalization and the adoption of new technologies in our services and solutions will be crucial to cater to Africa’s mobile-first consumer and business preferences.

Equally, a boost in intra-regional trade will be critical to growing the economy further, and there is room for logistics providers such as DHL to scale up our operations to support our customers’ needs.

Alaba: What’s your view on the African Continental Free Trade Area?

Amadou: Currently, Africa has the lowest intra-regional trade in the world as compared to Europe and Asia, so greater integration of African economies will accelerate growth by removing barriers to trade and investment, hence sharpening Africa’s edge in global trade and value chains. Logistics as an enabler of trade will also grow to support the region’s logistics needs, so wherever possible, we will look into new or existing markets to enter or grow, to best enjoy first-mover advantage and anticipate our customers’ needs.

Like ASEAN and the EU, ACFTA will enable stellar growth and job creation within the continent whilst making it more attractive for foreign investors.

Alaba: How would you describe your leadership style, and monitor the performance of the people you lead?

Amadou: I believe in our people as they are the cornerstone of the company’s success. They are the best we can find in the continent – in addition to being extremely skillful in their respective fields, they also wear their hearts on their sleeves, know Africa inside-out and are fiercely passionate about giving their best to our customers. Rather than monitor or micro-manage, I prefer to trust my senior management team to set clear goals, which their teams can align to, and make available the needed resources to help them do their work well.

It is important to set our people up for success, and celebrate little wins along the way, to keep our morale high.  In essence, positivity, enthusiasm, hard work and determination are the best combinations I put to play in order to lead with head, heart and guts. I have zero tolerance for corruption and disrespect.

Also Read: Saloodo, the logistics start-up becomes the first international digital road freight platform in Africa

Alaba: What inspires you and keeps you going? What books do you read?

Amadou: I work alongside a great team of colleagues in the region – every single individual comes ready each day to do our best for our customers, and this keeps the passion and fire in me going. It is especially rewarding to know that we have the best team for our customers, made up of experts in their fields and raring to go.  

The sparkle in the eyes of my colleagues, customers, friends and family keeps me going! My grandmother, Aissatou Labe is still my greatest source of inspiration, and she has not written any books. I read a lot on technology, innovation but also historical books detailing the stories of different entrepreneurs.

Alaba: What is your advice for aspiring entrepreneurs and investors in Africa?

Amadou: Be bold in your endeavors and place your customers’ interest at the heart of everything you do, without compromising on the welfare of your team. It will be tough at the get-go but keep your eye on the prize, and keep pushing your limits. Sacrifice for your teams and build their success, and they will be with you for the long run.

DHL

B I O G R A P H Y

Amadou Diallo is CEO of DHL Global Forwarding Middle East & Africa. Based in Dubai, he is responsible for the performance and long-term strategic development of the unit, a role he is well-placed to perform with his experience in logistics and international leadership. Mr. Diallo has more than 30 years of experience in the tourism, banking, express and logistics industries.

He is also the founder of Saloodo!, DHL’s first logistics online platform. Prior to this role, he took on various senior roles within the organization – CEO of DHL Freight, CEO of DHL Global Forwarding South Asia Pacific, Chief Financial Officer of DPDHL Logistics Division and Managing Director for the integration of Exel and DHL. Mr. Diallo has worked across all geographies in Europe, Africa and Asia.

Renowned for his expertise and forward-thinking approach towards corporate integrations, Mr. Diallo played a lead role in shaping the development and structure of the DHL Logistics Division through the Exel integration, which remains the largest corporate integration in the transportation and logistics industry to date. Mr. Diallo is Chairman of Amref Health Africa in Germany, a member of the boards of Welthungerhilfe, Global Business School Network and the Universal Business School of Mumbai.

He is Senegalese and fluent in several languages including English, German, French, Fulani, Wolof and Spanish. As of February 2019

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CEO Corner

EduStore Africa: We specialize in supplying technology-enhanced education in Africa- Sally Kim

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Sally Kim is an educational technology thought leader, international speaker and influencer. She is the Chief Executive for Edustore Africa, an EdTech company that focuses on STEAM, EdTech consultancy and an Inquisitive E-Commerce business managing diverse work force and leadership in the global environment.  In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, Sally talks about her brand, Edustore Africa and impact, education and technology in Africa. Excerpt.

 

Alaba: Kindly tell us about Edustore Africa, the gap its filling?

Sally: Our Motto: “Every child in every village deserves a better future through education.” Edustore Africa utilises a learner centered approaching the digital learning space and through smart partnerships with Robobloq and RoboCamp. This allows all stakeholders to experience the practical application of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics) learning environments.

 

Alaba: What exactly is digital learning? How important is it to Africa?

Sally: Digital learning does not have a single universally accepted definition. It includes but is not limited to delivering instructional material making effective use of technology. Technology has a twofold importance for Africa. The first is the chance to reach a maximum number of learners at the beginning of their education in a vast continent. The second is for those graduates to create, collaborate and innovate in every country here and globally.

 

Alaba: How do you measure your organization impact?

Sally: All our offerings involve a hands-on relationship with learners. Feedback is direct and immediate.

 

Alaba: What are the challenges and how are you overcoming them?

Sally: Understanding, acceptance and financial. Making sure people understand and accept the value and long term benefit of current technology.Working to obtain as wide an audience as possible to have access. These elements require targeted marketing.

 

Alaba: Why should coding robotics important and be included in our curriculum in Africa?

Sally: Children/Students have different talents and we can only explore their different strengths through inclusivity. We cannot solely focus on one sector and ignore another. Let’s have young minds be able to have the opportunity of being part of the revolution.

Alaba: How is Edustore Africa contributing to the development of Africa?

Sally: By putting the learner at the centre of the educational experience we ensure Africa is part of the conversation of development. We create an environment in which we can come up with our own solutions using current and inclusive technology. The opportunity to learn at your convenience, in your schools, individually and in dedicated camps are powerful tools.

 

Alaba: What is the future for your organization and what steps are you taking towards achieving them?

Sally: We want the whole of Africa to adapt the system and the technology. We need it to be a trend in Africa. We aim to create sustainable change in the continent. We are partnering with different individuals or organizations and schools all over Africa. We have people onboard who believe in the vision, are competent and passionate about it.

 

Alaba: What is your view on the development of Africa’s education ecosystem and tech? Especially with the girl child?

Sally: Africa is not where it was in terms of Education. A good number of people are adapting to the idea of technology in Education. Labs are more furnished. Schools are open to technology labs and clubs. We have more technology camps and Developers groups over the holidays. We encourage the girl child to get into technology and get excited about it. We know more needs to be done and we plan to be on the forefront.

 

Alaba: How can African government support the campaign on digital learning?

Sally: Let’s start with the fact that there is no African government. Africa is a continent, made up of fifty-four recognized states. Each is filled with diverse populations all with particular needs and challenges. Each government must change the curriculum to make it inclusive. They must support the advancement of labs especially in higher learning institutions.

 

Alaba: How do you relax when you are not working?

Sally is an avid reader and loves cooking when she is free.

 

Also Read- Lebohang Lebogo: First generation drone pilot delivering blood for SANBS

B I O G R A P H Y

Sally Kim is an educational technology thought leader, international speaker and influencer. She welcomes every opportunity to share her expertise of women leadership and instructional technology best practices with educational leaders worldwide.

She has a great passion for education and has been working towards improving education technology and empowering learners and educators with procurement of STEAM related educational resources. She is a worthy EdTech consultant and key note speaker.

Sally Kim has a bachelors on international marketing management from Alison School of Business Management. She has certificates and licenses from IBM on Artificial intelligence, Internet of things, Block Chain, Data science & Intro analytics, Cyber security and leadership in global environment.

Sally is the Chief Executive for Edustore Africa with several existing business associates in Europe, China, America and Sub-Saharan Africa.

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