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Sustainable Tourism Development In Africa: Interview With Thomas Müller, CEO, rainmaker

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Thomas Müller is an entrepreneur with more than 37 years of experience in IT and more than 16 years in digital marketing and technology in the global hospitality and tourism industry. In this exclusive interview, he shares his thoughts with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online on the state of sustainable tourism development in Africa, the role marketing and branding play in facilitating sustainable tourism, the impact of his company, rainmaker in Africa and more. Excerpts.

Alaba: Could you tell us about rainmaker digital and the gap it’s filling?

Thomas: rainmaker has been created as a social enterprise and as such is focused on the impact we can create for destinations, for their hospitality and tourism businesses and people. It is our passion to change the hospitality and tourism sector to keep more tourism spend in the destination through the democratization of technology which we make inclusively and pervasively available to all emerging, small, medium and independent hospitality and tourism businesses. With this, the destination and their hospitality and tourism businesses take back control of their visibility, digital presence, reputation, marketing communication, and distribution. 

Together with Tourism Authorities and Hospitality and Tourism Associations we create a public-private partnership, create local capacity and create a digital transformation initiative, aligned to the UNWTO digital transformation strategy and contributing to the Sustainability Goals.

Alaba: What attracted you to sustainable tourism development in Africa?

Thomas: I have got my “Africa-Virus” already in 1984 when I traveled to Kenya. When I was working with Thomas Cook in the early 2000’s I spend quite some time in Senegal. However, for 10 years I am now living in Namibia and am very active in the Southern African and Pan-African Travel, Tourism, and Hospitality industry. 

I have realized that in the last 5 years the world has dramatically change to the disadvantage of the destinations and their hospitality and tourism businesses and therefore for its people. One major result of tourism is to contribute to the sustainable development of the destination and its people. However, the way things have developed worried me. 

Traditional value chains are no longer sustainable as only 50% of the potential traveler makes use of a high street travel agent and therefore the traditional value chain of a travel agent – wholesale operator – DMC inbound tour operator. At the same time, hundreds of digital platforms have been created. With this a duopoly of the booking holdings and Expedia group has been established, two companies with about 40+ brands now dominating the market. 

At the same time, I saw the hospitality and tourism businesses suffer from the overwhelming complexity and the increasing cost of distribution while at the same tie losing total control of their visibility, reputation, and distribution, becoming ever more dependent. 

The fact that such a platform makes more money with a booking that the hospitality and tourism business in the destination worried me. I simply find this unethical as tourism in that way can’t contribute to a destination sustainable development as it should and could. I also call this market situation “Colonialism 3.0”.

 It has become my passion and vision to change this for the better of the destination, their hospitality and tourism businesses and people. That is when I started rainmaker as a social enterprise or zebra type company in 2016.

Alaba: What are your major achievements and impacts in Africa?

Thomas: We started in 2016 in Namibia and we grew on average by 100% each year only in Namibia. We only started rendering our services in South Africa in late 2018. 

We have achieved some 42 Million 360° virtual tour views for our Namibian customers; those have been gained from 11.7 million Google Searches, 23.1 million views. Looking at the conversion we gained some 321.000 website conversions, 612.000 directions conversions, and 74.000 phone call conversions. Finally, more than N$ 20 Million in direct booking revenue have been achieved for our Namibian customers. Some customers we only grew by 80% but others we grew by 700% of direct revenue. This is a significant achievement towards their profit and sustainability. 

Given that Namibia is a rather small destination with only some 250.000 to 300.000 leisure tourists, where we only have a market share of about 18% in the hospitality and tourism sector, this is a significant achievement and track record, given that for example the official website of the tourism board scores some 700.000 views per year.

It is because of this tangible impact, our 5 Stages of Success and our VISTA Destination Network have been awarded with the prestigious HSMAI (Hospitality Sales & Marketing Association International) in New York in 2018, with the World Tourism Forum Lucern Destination Innovation Start-Up Award in 2018 and with the African Tourism Leadership Forum Award in 2019.

Alaba: How does your organisation measure its impact?

Thomas: The impact we achieve is measured by key performance parameters such as increase in occupancy, an improvement on average daily room rate, migration from online travel and DMC bookings towards direct bookings and the impact on ADR and profit as well as the improvement of the respective online reputation which as a significant impact on direct bookings. Furthermore, the number of searches, views, and conversions from Google based on the overall strategy.

Alaba: What are the practical tips to create links among ecotourism, conservation and community development?

Thomas: When it comes to terms and buzzwords such as ecotourism, sustainable tourism, green tourism, responsible tourism, etc. I am getting quite excited as this is a big topic nowadays in almost every source market to Africa. However, as you can see already on the wording, and the so-called “Greta Thunberg” effect has done a lot to sensitize travelers, it is rather only focused on the ecological site of sustainable and to an extent to the social side of sustainability. 

I am of the opinion that this is short thinking and not taking all aspects into account. To me, there is one major part missing. Economical sustainability. If that can’t be achieved in the first place, there is no basis, no funds and no resources available in a destination and from their hospitality and tourism businesses to properly invest in social and/or economic sustainability and with this helping communities, conservancies and therefore emerging businesses, entrepreneurs and the people in the region to prosper.

As long as 60% to 80% of the profits leaking outside of the destination to global giants, this is a problem we need to fix in order to actually achieve a real sustainable tourism development.

Alaba: Can you say that sustainable destinations have a competitive edge? Why?

Thomas: Yes, they do have a competitive edge as the world and the travelers globally are sensitized on climate change, sustainability, ecotourism, green tourism, etc. and are very careful when selecting their journey. However and as mentioned above, they are not aware that they actually harm a destination and it’s hospitality and tourism businesses when booking through online travel agents and such as their tourism spend doesn’t contribute to the destination, their hospitality, and tourism business and its people as it should and could.

We need to make the traveler aware of the impact it has, especially for developing countries and destinations, their businesses and people when booking directly instead of through platforms.

Alaba: What role does brand and marketing play in facilitating a more sustainable tourism in Africa?

Thomas: It plays a huge role in my perspective. But as mentioned the focus is only on one or two parts being the ecological and social segment of sustainability, often neglecting the at least equally important economical sustainability aspect. There is a growing market of conscious travelers who care. This issue needs to be addressed and the market needs to be made aware.

Alaba: What advice will you give African decision-makers (political and business) on tourism sustainability?

Thomas: Well, from my perspective, destinations need to enable to do businesses with potential travelers to meet their demands, wants and desires while at the same time address the sustainability issue as a holistic topic. 

At first, every hospitality and tourism business in a destination is it a Lodge, Guesthouse, B&B, Guest Farm, Hotel, Activity Provider, Activity Provider, Tour Guide, Car Rental provider, and local Tour Operators need to be digitally enabled. 

This is why we are working with Tourism Authorities, Tourism Associations and the UNWTO to democratize technology, make it pervasively and inclusively available in a public-private partnership and freemium applications. 

It provides a huge competitive advantage for all stakeholders in the destination and makes it seamless and easy for potential travelers to do dream, plan, book and pay for their journey in such an enabled destination.

Alaba: What are the trends to watch in Africa’s tourism ecosystem in 2020?

Thomas: While many countries and destinations such as Ghana, Rwanda, South Africa, and others are on the right track and are very dynamic and progressive with all kinds of innovation, digitization and implementing the basis for the 4th industrial revolution, other countries are a bit behind and need to hurry up in order to gain back control of their visibility, digital presence, reputation, communication and distribution for sustainable tourism development. 

I know that there are many fancy technologies and some vendors talk about the Internet of Things (IoT) automated check-in/checkout and automated room key on the smartphone etc. However, I am of the belief that we first need to get the basics right and enable the destinations and their hospitality and tourism businesses before we even look at all the fancy and cool technology that might work in a Hotel in New York but not necessarily in an i.e. remote Safari Lodge in Africa. It is also the question if travelers even want this.

Alaba: Could you mention some of your favorite destinations in Africa?

Thomas: This is a very difficult question as every country has its beauty and attraction. You can’t really compare them with each other. This is why “Brand Africa” is an important initiative. We are not 54 countries competing against each other, but 54 countries offering the most diverse, interesting and educational experience in all aspects.

Also Read: Lillian Barnard: Tech Enthusiast And First Female Managing Director, Microsoft South Africa

B I O G R A P H Y

Thomas Müller is an entrepreneur with more than 37 years of experience in IT and more than 16 years in digital marketing and technology in the global hospitality and tourism industry. While working for companies such as IBM, (Mannesman Mobilfunk) Vodafone, TUI, Thomas Cook, amongst others, he was part of opening four Hotels, turning around Hotels and other tourism businesses and started rainmaker digital as a social enterprise TravelTech company in Namibia in 2016.

Thomas had the opportunity of working and living in eight countries around the globe and Southern Africa is his home for more than 10 years. It is his passion to democratize technology for African destinations and its hospitality and tourism businesses to keep more tourism spend in the destination for sustainable tourism development. For the extraordinary achievements of the 5 Stages of Success and the VISTA Destination Network, Thomas and rainmaker were honored with several awards in Europe, the USA, and Africa.

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CEO Corner

African Infrastructure Investment Managers appoints Vuyo Ntoi and Sola Lawson as new co-CEOs

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African Infrastructure Investment Managers new co-CEOs, Vuyo Ntoi and Sola Lawson (Source: AIIM Africa)

London and Cape Town, 3 August 2020: African Infrastructure Investment Managers (AIIM), a member of Old Mutual Alternative Investments and Africa’s most experienced infrastructure manager, has appointed two joint-managing directors to be based in Cape Town and Lagos, following the retirement of the company’s previous CEO.

Vuyo Ntoi and Sola Lawson, have been appointed from within the business, and will continue to sit in their South Africa and Nigeria offices respectively, as two of AIIM’s key markets in sub-Saharan Africa. As AIIM’s new joint-MD’s, they take over from Jurie Swart, who has been CEO of AIIM since 2014 and recently elected to take early retirement to focus on a new challenge outside the AIIM business.  

Also Read: Lindelwe Lesley Ndlovu, African Risk Capacity (ARC) CEO Shares Goals, Disaster Risk Solutions, COVID-19 and Future

Commenting on the new roles, Paul Boynton, non-executive chairman of the Board at AIIM said: “Vuyo and Sola have both been integral members of the AIIM team for many years and bring with them extensive and varied investment experience and leadership skills. On behalf of the entire Board, I am looking forward to working even closer with them in their new joint-MD roles as the business continues to expand and move forward.”  

Vuyo Ntoi said, “I am very excited to step into this new joint role, continuing to work with Sola and the Exco team to drive the strategy that we have had in place, which has and continues to deliver excellent outcomes for our investors and stakeholders.”

Sola Lawson added, “I am honoured to take on the role of joint-MD of AIIM and look forward to working closely with Vuyo and the wider team to continue to build on the strong foundations developed throughout Jurie’s time as CEO and to help progress AIIM’s strategic journey.”

Vuyo Ntoi has been a member of the senior management team at AIIM for over a decade and is the co-portfolio manager of AIIM’s IDEAS Managed Fund, one of South Africa’s largest domestic infrastructure equity funds. He was also involved in the initial roll out of the business across the continent and has led and participated in high profile and pioneering projects in South Africa, Ghana, Nigeria and Mali.

Sola Lawson joined AIIM in 2011, founding the Nigeria office, AIIM’s first permanent establishment in Africa outside of South Africa. He has been a member of the senior management team at AIIM since joining and is a member of the IDEAS investment committee. Sola has played a leading role in originating, executing and managing c. USD500 million of AIIM-managed fund investments across Africa, serving on the board of directors of several AIIM portfolio companies within the digital infrastructure, power or renewables and midstream sectors. Prior to joining AIIM, Sola was a member of the infrastructure funds team at Macquarie Group, and prior to that worked at PwC London.

Issued by: AIIM Africa

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Lindelwe Lesley Ndlovu, African Risk Capacity (ARC) CEO Shares Goals, Disaster Risk Solutions, COVID-19 and Future

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Lindelwe Lesley Ndlovu is an executive with extensive international experience in insurance and investment management. He is currently the CEO of the African Risk Capacity “ARC” Ltd. ARC Ltd is a specialist insurance company that provides parametric insurance coverage to African countries against extreme weather events and natural disasters. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola, Lesley shares his goals, disaster risk solutions, COVID-19 and the future. Excerpt.

Alaba: Could you briefly tell us about ARC Ltd and the gap its filling in Africa?

Lesley: ARC is a specialist insurance company that was established by the African Union to help African governments improve their capacities to better plan, prepare, and respond to extreme weather events and natural disasters, and adapt to climate change. ARC works through collaboration and innovative finance, to enable countries to strengthen their disaster risk management systems and access rapid and predictable financing when disaster strikes to protect the food security and livelihoods of their vulnerable populations.

From 2014 to 2019, ARC cumulatively provided drought insurance coverage worth US$590 million to insure 59 million vulnerable people in Member States and paid out US$61 million in insurance claims.

Alaba: As its new Chief Executive, what are your set milestone in terms of growth and impact?

Lesley: Our target is to achieve US$100 million in gross written premiums in the next 5 years, providing gross insurance coverage of US$1 billion. This level of scale will allow us to reach 150 million people in Africa and more effectively use insurance to protect people against food insecurity brought about by natural disasters such as droughts and floods, the frequency and severity of natural disasters is increasing as a result of climate change.

Alaba: Establishing a risk pooling insurer is clearly a difficult task. What can other Regions learn from the ARC concept?

Lesley: The idea of sovereign risk pooling is catching on globally, the Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility was the first pool set up in 2007 after the devastating hurricanes suffered by the Caribbean countries. ARC Ltd was set up in 2014, subsequently other risk pools have been set up for the Pacific Island nations, the Pacific Catastrophe Risk Assessment and Financing Initiative and SEADRIF in South East Asia.

The success of the risk pools depends a great deal on political support by the member countries and a clearly demonstrable value for all the pool members.

Alaba: What are the benefits of your products for vulnerable member sovereign?

Lesley: The main benefit of working with ARC Ltd, is that we are owned by the African countries and therefore exist to cater to their unique needs. We are able to build customized insurance solutions for each country. Our parametric insurance product pays claims very quickly, typically within 10 days of the insured event, giving governments timely funding to start the relief and recovery efforts. Furthermore, ARC Ltd has an Agency arm which provides capacity building for countries to help them understand the risks that they face and development mitigation strategies.

Alaba: Could you discuss more on The Extreme Climate Facility (XCF) initiative?

Lesley: The XCF is an exciting and very innovative concept. The main objective of the Extreme Climate Facility (XCF) is to reduce vulnerability to extreme events by providing enabling conditions for increased adaptation investment and improved risk transfer. The XCF structure combines a green bond and a catastrophe bond, issued centrally on behalf of member states can address critical barriers to adaptation investment and increase post-disaster funding.

Alaba: How is the current global pandemic affecting ARC? Are you Post COVID-19 prepared?

Lesley: Financially, the COVID induced volatility in the financial markets reduced the market value of our investment portfolio. However, our investment portfolio is made up of high quality, investment grade bonds which we fully expect will pay at par, the default risk remains extremely low.

From a business perspective, our sovereign clients had to respond to COVID 19 and this put a tremendous strain on their finances and in some instances, negatively impacted their ability to pay insurance premiums. Furthermore, due to the lockdown restrictions it was challenging to sustain ongoing interactions with the governments. However, the ability to work remotely has improved over time and the lockdown restrictions are slowly being eased.

All the teams within ARC Ltd have been able to adapt to working remotely and there has been minimal disruption to our activities.

ARC will be launching an insurance product covering Outbreaks and Epidemics, the insurance payouts will provide the funding required for an early and effective government response.

Alaba: How does the use of technology provide opportunities in the fact of natural disaster?

Lesley: Insurance is a data driven industry, data enables us to understand and calibrate risks, to develop appropriate mitigation measures. In parametric insurance we rely on satellites for rainfall data and we use technology to model and predict losses that arise from weather events. This data can be used to anticipate disasters and take timely action to prevent them or reduce their severity.

Alaba: What is the future for ARC in terms of its size, products and impact?

Lesley: ARC Ltd is currently diversifying its product range to include coverage against floods, tropical cyclones and outbreaks & epidemics. We already have a very successful drought insurance product which has been the mainstay of the company. The new products are essential to more holistically meet the needs of our clients and to ensure diversification on our balance sheet. These additional products will allow us to reach our ambition of US$100 million in gross revenues while ensuring that we are more relevant and credible in meeting the needs of our clients.

Alaba: As an industry leader, how can Africa better develop and position its insurance market?

Lesley: Insurance penetration, which is the ratio of insurance premiums to GDP remains rather low in Africa at 1 to 3% compared to over 10% in most developed markets. This low penetration is linked to limited knowledge of insurance as a risk management tool, lack of trust of insurance companies and products that are too complex and do not fully meet the needs and expectations of customers. The insurance industry plays an importance role in the economy by making households more resilient to shocks and giving entrepreneurs’ confidence to launch new ventures, in addition insurance companies are long term investors in the financial markets.

To grow the insurance industry, governments need to create an enabling regime through risk based supervision of insurance companies and the insurance industry needs to develop appropriate and relevant products and build distribution systems that make it easier and more cost effective to reach customers.

Alaba: How do you relax outside work? Tell us one of your favourite destinations in Africa? Why?

Lesley: I am an avid long distance runner, I run about 80 to 100km every week. Running clears my mind and makes me sharper and more focused. My favorite destination is Diani Beach in Kenya; it has dreamy unspoilt white sand beaches that stretch out as far as the eye can see.

Lindelwe Lesley Ndlovu

B I O G R A P H Y

Lindelwe Lesley Ndlovu

Lindelwe Lesley Ndlovu is an executive with extensive international experience in insurance and investment management. He is currently the CEO of the African Risk Capacity “ARC” Ltd. ARC Ltd is a specialist insurance company that provides parametric insurance coverage to African countries against extreme weather events and natural disasters.

Lesley spent close to a decade in various senior management roles in insurance and asset management with the AXA Group in London, Paris and Singapore, including as CEO of a Lloyd’s of London insurance syndicate, Head of Corporate Development for AXA Global Asset Management and Chief Investment Officer for AXA Singapore.

Prior to joining the AXA Group, he was Vice President, Investments at AXIS Capital in Bermuda, as part of an institutional investment team managing US$15 billion in a global multi-asset investment portfolio. He began his professional career with Deloitte, where he had various assignments in corporate finance, audit, tax advisory. He currently serves as a Non-Executive Director for various financial services companies around the world.

Lindelwe Lesley Ndlovu is a graduate of Christ Church, University of Oxford in England and at the Institut Européen d’Administration des Affaires (INSEAD) in France. He is a CFA charter holder, a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of England & Wales and a member of the Institute of Directors.

Also Read: Interview with Monica Sekhmet Grant, President of Young Boss Media Inc.

Visit: African Risk Capacity

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CEO Corner

Dr. Olutoyin Oyelade: Casa Foundation, Career and Impact (Biography)

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Dr. Olutoyin Oyelade has garnered 27 years cognate experience from vertical industry including banking, finance, real estate investments, and non-profit sector management. Olutoyin started her banking career in 1992 as a management trainee in Nigeria; and rose to become the Vice President of Treasury and Group Executive, Investment Banking in 2007.

Following her relocation to Canada, she consulted with like-minded professionals in her community with an aim to identify the gaps in social-economic development and how these gaps could be bridged to promote development. Her goal was to deepen economic prosperity of start-ups and African diasporas businesses to impact the Community. The result of this community-wide engagement in 2011 led to the creation CasaFoundation for International Development.

That same year, Olutoyin started Friends of Africa (FOA) Economic Forum as a platform to fasttrack business and economic growth of Africa. ubsequently, CasaFoundation launched AfroInvestors (Investors Magazine on Africa), Exchange (Founders’ forum), and Women-Inspire, (celebrating Businesswomen). CasaFoundation has shaped the conversation around the African-rising narrative and how the diasporas can facilitate economic prosperity of the World.

Education

Olutoyin’s educational background influenced some of the steps she took towards her educational development. She obtained a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Ondo State University, Nigeria in 1989. In 1999, she received an MBA from Nigeria’s premier University, Obafemi Awolowo University (formerly University of Ife), and later enrolled for executive management programs to hone her leadership and management skills. She completed the senior management program at Lagos Business School in 2005.

In 2006, Olutoyin completed the Business marketing program at IMD, Lausanne, Geneva, and by 2009, she had graduated from Wharton School’s advanced management program. In 2012, Olutoyin embarked on another journey of self- discovery by starting a Doctoral program. She completed the program within 3 years and graduated in May 2016 with a Doctor of Management (in Leadership) from University of Maryland USA (Global Campus).

Business and Social Enterprise

In 2013 Olutoyin started InVcap Corporation, an investment Advisory firm, that consults for potential Investors in Africa. Through InVcap and FOA, Olutoyin has rallied Leaders from Africa and other Continents, representing vertical sectors, to FOA Round table sessions, where they re-think and reshape their mindsets about the necessary solutions that could transform Africa and its people. FOA engages with Canadian and Diaspora businesses, with an aim to maximize opportunities for the social and economic wellbeing of the citizenry.

Dr. Olutoyin Oyelade speaking at IWD Forum (Source: CasaFoundation )

Several start-ups, technical partnerships, and investment groups have emerged from the FOA initiative, they are available for consulting in Canada, to advance development, and to offer technical partnerships in Africa, and ultimately to strengthen Diaspora groups to contribute to the economic development of Canada and Africa. Casa Foundation programs, such as FOA-Economic Forum, Women inspire, and the EXChange for Entrepreneurs, are funded with the support of members, board, and sponsorship of likeminded institutions, including Banks.

Dr. Olutoyin Oyelade speaking at Women Inspire event (Source: CasaFoundation )

As part of its three-fold agenda to advance youth, women, and infrastructure development, in 2015, Olutoyin initiated the CasaFoundation International business scholarship program. CasaFoundation board embraced the scholarship initiative. CasaFoundation has since joined the hall of Sponsors at Centennial College by Sponsoring its International Students program.

By 2015, following a very successful FOA Summit, Olutoyin created a team to review the findings at the summit that Casa youths preferred a platform where they could effectively engage on small businesses, partnership opportunities, and sales- Entrepreneurs Exchange resulted from this initiative.

Olutoyin has continued to impact the lives of Youths and students through the Entrepreneurs’ Exchange platform that addresses their needs. The Exchange is a quarterly workshop session with speakers drawn from Fortune 500 and Top Companies to support the vision of young Innovators. The Exchange aimsto train 1000 youths by October 2020. At an average participation of 49 delegates per quarter, the Exchange program has now trained over 930 youths at Entrepreneurspoint.com incubator.

Dr Olutoyin with Min. Maryam Monsef (Source: CasaFoundation)

Olutoyin started Entrepreneurs point (EP) operations in 2018, to advance, empower, and develop Entrepreneurs by adopting a trifold approach of: mentorship, sponsorship, and partnerships. EP operates as a business incubator for Innovators, start-ups, and youths. EP incubates aspiring entrepreneurs and offers them paid shared-office space, business shadowing, mentorship, and fast-track innovation and creativity of groups.

Philanthropy and Community Engagement

Olutoyin executes all her philanthropic works through her NGO- Casa Foundation. Her Mother and Child program supports Mothers and children aged 0-5 in Africa. Olutoyin continues to serve as consultant and advisor to entrepreneurs, youths, and women in the Canadian Small Business sector. She is opportuned to speak at many Conferences in Toronto, Including Invest in Africa, TEDx, Canadian African Professionals Forum, Friends of Africa, and more to Canadians on Investment opportunities and location in the emerging markets.

She serves as an Advisor to the African Expert Network, a Washington-based Investment Advisory Group, and was recently appointed to the COVID-19 Resource Mobilisation Committee for Ekiti-State, Nigeria. In the Academia, she speaks and teaches entrepreneurship at Colleges including Humber, Ryerson, York Entrepreneurship. She serves on the Boards and Councils of Social Impact organizations across North America including: Casa Foundation, Light House, Friends of Africa, Entrepreneurspoint.com

Dr. Olutoyin Oyelade at a TEDx event (Source: CasaFoundation)

Moreover, she has taught entrepreneurship programs at Women Entrepreneurship Hub program at Ryerson University, Women in Business, New-Comer programs, and regularly speaks on these topics to diverse communities including, TEDx Talks, She Leads Africa, and Voice America. She is regularly featured as an Advisor and Speaks at Women and Youth Conferences. Her groups and members continue to enjoy the benefits of her networks and leverage these various platforms maximally to improve entrepreneurship, innovation, business, women advancement, and economic development.

Commendations, Awards, and Recognitions

Dr. Olutoyin is the recipient of many awards. From her years in banking to date, she continues to raise the bar. She was Merit Award Winner and CEO Excellence Award Winner at the Nigerian Intercontinental Merchant Bank, and  at Intercontinental Banking group, she won many Awards for  Fundraising and management.

In Canada, she has received many recognitions and awards  including a commendation from the Government of Ontario for Creating Friends of Africa Summit, the Diasporan Achiever Award-by Diasporan magazine of the Nigerian House of Representatives, Courage Awards by Women of Courage-Canada; African Impact Leadership Award at the African Women Forum, by Amazon NewYork, Induction into Global Leaders Forum, by Women of Influence , Canada, SuperWomen Achievers Awards in Canada, amongst others (read more on Dr. Olutoyin Oyelade)

Also read: Meseret Haileyesus – The Ethiopian Canadian Women Leader Creating Impact

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