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Why Virtual Staffing is Important for Business Growth

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Virtual staffing (Image: SuccessDigest)

You may have come across the term virtual staffing or outsourcing before but if you haven’t then you need not worry because by the end of this piece you’ll have all the information you require to determine whether virtual staffing is the right solution for your business.

Essentially, the term virtual staffing is broadly associated with outsourcing, which is simply a process by which companies either contract individuals or agencies in order to meet their business objectives. Contrary to some myths perpetuated by the industry’s critics, virtual staffing tends to actually begin when organisations understand their unique competitive advantage and gain insight into the areas of their offering that others can perform better. For example, if a company’s core competencies are in product design or development, it is sensible that it seeks expert resources to meet its non-core competencies from those individuals or agencies that are more specialised in those areas in order to achieve optimal efficiency outcomes. In short, it is getting the best talent wherever it may be located even if it means outsourcing.

Virtual Staffing Varieties

Most businesses today currently use some form of outsourcing at some point in their value chain. Technology has advanced the virtual staffing process and we have to remember that these developments have been largely driven by consumer and investor needs. For instance, most manufacturers today outsource significant portions of the components of their finished products. Similarly in the service industry, businesses now regularly make use of virtual staffing to run their back office operations from customer service, HR, accounting to technical functions.

Virtual staffing can be classified according to location. As far as the different kinds of companies, their operation can be identified by three main areas of activities:

  • Local staffing – applies to companies whose operations are restricted to the local market in terms of their labour requirements.
  • Offshore staffing – refers to instances where businesses tend to seek expertise outside their national borders in order to access the specialisedlabour which may not be easily available locally.
  • Nearshore staffing – refers to strategic outsourcing to areas which share commonalities such as language and these tend to be within the creative industries where communication is key to the success of undertakings.

Furthermore, virtual staffing can split into two categories. These are Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) and Knowledge Process Outsourcing (KPO). Some of the main differences between the two include:

BPO

This implies outsourcing particular process tasks for instance customer service or payroll. The nature of the work is typically front office or back office related. This includes tasks such as technical support and customer orientated work like marketing. Other types of activities that are associated with business process outsourcing include virtual staffing for data entry services, writing, typesetting, or transcription services, bookkeeping, multimedia and design related jobs.

KPO

Knowledge Process Outsourcing on the other hand typically requires much more virtual staff involvement in tasks. Companies seeking to employ advanced levels of research, analytical and technical skills such as those sought after in research and development work, legal services, intellectual property research, architectural and industrial design, just to name a few. There tends to be higher engagement and advanced sourcing negotiations associated with KPO work.

Finding The Right Talent

The great thing about virtual staffing is that there are higher chances of finding the right talent because of increased availability when looking beyond borders. If your hiring is restricted to the local market then there are also chances that companies can miss out on a better or more equipped labour force. To get access to a wider talent pool businesses have long been searching for the best candidates across borderlines. Due to the competitive nature of many industries it’s no longer adequate for businesses to use local resources only for the simple fact of keeping things local. Today, with many businesses now part of the digital economy, entrepreneurs are waking to the fact that to be successful, utilizing the appropriate online tools is key.

The pressure to deliver the best quality in order to maintain competitive advantage has never been greater so businesses are using the convenience of technology to locate the best talent. Often it is as simple as registering a business on internet platforms, advertising the positions and providing the necessary jobs specifications and then drawing workers from all over the globe to your offer and doing the necessary assessments and due diligence and actually getting projects underway is a very short space of time. That is the power of social networks today. However, it’s sometimes better for companies to find the right virtual staffing partners who are reliable and have the reputation and proof to back up their claims and let them handle the recruiting.

There are also a number of trusted online platforms which help connect clients and virtual staff including online sites such as Upwork and BidModo.

Why Virtual Staffing Might Be Ideal for Your Business

There are numerous reasons why so many companies are turning to virtual staffing services. Some of the benefits of outsourcing include:

  • Greater access to a highly skilled workforce.
  • Increased flexibility allowing businesses to hire according to their business requirements.
  • Virtual employees tend to be happier workers because increasingly more people want greater employment flexibility to allow them to work as and when it suits them.
  • Higher scalability because companies do not need to rent or buy larger office or industrial space in order to carry out their business functions and this also strengthens business balance sheets since there are less operational costs. 
  • There is increased efficiency because tasks can be outsourced to workers in different time zones allowing companies to operate on a 24/7 basis.

Also Read: Chidi Nwaogu: Multi Award-Winning Entrepreneur Launches Global Fellowship Program for Aspiring And Early-Stage Entrepreneurs

How to Get Started

It’s actually not complicated to find the right virtual staffing solutions and start benefiting your business. What companies need to do is find a reliable virtual staff provider, outline their specific requirements, provide detailed project briefs and preferred candidate profiles and set up a system for quality checking the virtual staffing services and literally start giving the green light on projects and achieve the desired business objectives.

There are several reliable freelance sites where you can get skilled labour to meet your virtual staffing needs. There are a variety of expertise you can outsource to Upwork, Fever and such virtual staffing sites including design, writing, marketing, and administrative tasks. Another reputable site is Toptal where businesses can find quality virtual staff to execute tasks that are particularly tech related. It’s well known for having great clients from some of the biggest corporations in the world. Other sites like Freelancer are also good for outsourcing jobs quickly. A new wave of outsourcing is also emerging with the likes of TaskRabbit and AirTasker which are platforms where you can virtually find people to do almost any type of job fast and efficiently. There is also the potential to network with freelancers and virtual staff who are willing to work remotely through platforms such as LinkedIn,Behance, 99 Designs and PeoplePerHour.

Written by: Heath Muchena, author of The Digital Economy Survival Toolkit, a book that highlights why being online is important for startups and small businesses and The Digital Entrepreneur Manual, a comprehensive list of descriptive links to free resources, tools, platforms and apps that you need to set up an income generating business on the internet.

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Press Release

Thabo Mashegoane Appointed As Chairman of the Africa ICT Alliance (AfICTA)

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Thabo Mashegoane

The President and Board Chairperson of the Institute of Information Technology Professionals South Africa (IITPSA), Thabo Mashegoane, has been elected as Chairman of the Africa ICT Alliance (AfICTA).

Formerly the Vice-Chairman of AfICTA, he succeeds Engr. Hossam Elgamal from Egypt to become the third Chairman. AfICTA, a private sector-led alliance of ICT Associations, multinational corporations, companies, organisations and individuals in the ICT sector in Africa, aims to fulfil the promise of the digital age for everyone in Africa by encouraging dialogue and fostering ICT enabled development.

During an electronic election at the AfICTA Annual General Meeting on 25 November, Mashegoane was elected chair, while IITPSA Past President and Non-Executive Director Ulandi Exner was also elected AfICTA Vice-Chair for Southern Africa.

The election named the following board members and officers: Paul Rowney, Deputy Chair; Opeyemi Onifade, Treasurer; Dr. Waudo Siganga, Vice-Chair for East Africa; Engr. Assem Wahby, Vice-Chair, North Africa; Adetola Sogbesan, Vice-Chair, West Africa; and Eric Sindeu, Vice-Chair, Central Africa.  

Thanking his predecessors for their service and leadership in the Alliance to date, Mashegoane noted that AfICTA was an organisation with a vast network, impact on critical policies, and reputation that took years and hard work to build. “Mine is to take the baton and continue where the honourable Engr. Hossam Elgamal has taken this organisation to. Of importance is the platform to enable African countries to collaborate and share best practices and lessons learnt with an objective of not leaving anyone behind in development. This is a vision we will continue to uphold. We stand in a critical position to influence attainment of Sustainable Development Goals 2030 through ICT.”

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Speaking after the election, Mashegoane said digital inclusion and ICT-enabled development was also a key mission for the IITPSA in South Africa.  “The IITPSA shares the vision and ethos of AfICTA. IITPSA has also stated that we need to step up efforts to achieve the goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which, among other things, seeks to bridge the digital divide and harness technology to address major global challenges such as poverty, climate change and conflict, we need to work harder. At IITPSA, we believe this means we have to collaborate across industries, across countries, to deploy the benefits of ICTs for the good of all,” he said.

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Baller Syndicate: Building The First Elite Athlete Angel Syndicate In Africa And Europe

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Baller Syndate Founders – Koen Bosma (r) and Jason Esseboom (l) (Source: Baller Syndicate)

Baller Syndicate is an exclusive network of elite athletes that are looking to get into tech investing. An initiative by Koen Bosma and Jason Esseboom, two former athletes who were better at startups than playing football. They played together in a youth academy, and Koen even turned pro. The founders crossed paths again in the world of startups and innovation. Koen and Jason share a passion for sports, entrepreneurship, and investments. In this interview with Alaba Ayinuola of Business Africa Online, they talked about how they are positioning elite athletes to become successful tech investors, through their educational like-minded community and building bridges between Europe and Africa.

Over the past few years, they have worked with hundreds of startups and invested in 20+. Most of those startups are trying to break into the sports-, health-, and entertainment industry. During this time, Koen and Jason had the privilege of working closely with founders, which gave them great insights and a first-row seat to startups’ biggest pain point.

Startups in the sports-, health, and entertainment industries have a disproportionate mismatch with angels that can truly accelerate their journey, compared to startups in other industries.

When Koen and Jason looked closely, they spotted a trend in the USA of elite athletes making tech investments cool and accessible to the world. Athletes like Lebron James, Kevin Durant, and Serena Williams are building their own family offices, venture funds, becoming LP’s or making direct or syndicated angel investments. So they asked themselves the question: why is this not happening in the rest of the world?

This led to starting Baller Syndicate.

Alaba: So what does Baller Syndicate do?

Koen: Our vision is to unlock athletes’ capabilities as accelerators for the growth of startups. When we started having conversations with active-, and retired athletes about their post-career activities, we truly learned a lot. Simply mentioning the term “investment” to an athlete in Europe turns all signals to red and makes their alarm bells go off! We could hear them thinking: “are these guys trying to take my money!?.

The interesting thing, however, was that when we took the conversations a layer deeper, we learned athletes get approached for investment opportunities quite regularly, but always ‘through a guy.’ When athletes don’t fully understand the concept, the default is to rely on someone they trust.”

We learned that athletes “solve” their lack of knowledge about investment opportunities by putting their trust in a person they know well.

Baller Syndicate’s goal is to decrease the knowledge gap by educating athletes with understandable content. Education is liberation, and that’s how they will help athletes change the narrative!

Alaba: Tell me, how does your education work with the tight schedules athletes have?

Jason: Overall, our education consists of two parts. We noticed that there is so much good content out there, but navigating it can be challenging or even overwhelming. Our vision towards education is to aggregate the most relevant content and translate it into a language athletes understand. We don’t see ourselves as professors but as translators.

Our first approach is to make an online course with actionable and engaging videos. This is the theoretical part. For the second part, we interview athletes that are active as investors or entrepreneurs to provide valuable case studies. Providing the theory is necessary because if we’d just share case studies, athletes miss foundational knowledge. To make learning fun and engaging, we chose to explain investments through sports analogies, using stories all athletes can relate to. Everything we offer is online, so the athletes determine when and where they want to learn.

Of course, we dream of a big live event where we connect the worlds of startups and athlete investors, but that’s not happening in a world governed by a pandemic.

In our way of working, we are lean startup evangelists at our core. This means we start with something, test it, and adjust based on the feedback. We test our educational program with a small group of selected athletes and truly learn if our translations resonate with them. After testing, we know where we need to improve to move forward and help more athletes.

Regarding the content of our education, we have three principles:

  1. We skip jargon or break it down
  2. We logically structure content, tested by elite athletes
  3. We facilitate group learning through our community

We believe this structure puts athletes at an advantage to learn how they can make independent investment decisions.”

Alaba: How do you make money?

Koen: Right now, we don’t… We invest our time and money to make Baller Syndicate into something valuable for athletes and startups. The sportstech ecosystem really needs to grow, and we believe we need to give first and hopefully get something in return later. Baller Syndicate is our way of building the sportstech ecosystem. Our educational platform will run as a foundation, where athletes pay a small fee as a yearly contribution. Secondly, we are attracting corporate sponsors that have a similar vision as ours, to pitch in a bit.

Baller Syndicate operates as a typical angel syndicate for athletes who have learned they wish to go into tech investments. In a syndicate, athletes pool money and invest together in startups they select themselves. We facilitate athletes by finding the right startups and guiding athletes throughout investing in those startups.

Our business model is based on carried interest, which means we only make a buck when their athletes make profits. But we have some strict “rules” for our members to start with tech investments.

If the athletes don’t know how to activate an investment, there is just waste. So before any tech investment through the Baller Syndicate platform, we ask these five questions below:

  1. Does the startup have something special that fits the profile of our members?
  2. Can we add value beyond money (and the obvious Twitter post)?
  3. Are multiple athletes on board?
  4. Do the interested athletes know they need to create a balanced portfolio of startups and not ‘bet’ on 1 or 2?
  5. Is there a lead investor (in case of large investment rounds)?

There are many other factors to consider, but we ask these vital questions to help elite athletes de-risk their startup investments. Our goal for 2020 is simple: to build our educational content and test it with a selected group of 10 athletes. We are currently primarily working with footballers, but there are also professional golf- and tennis players.

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Jason: Building this syndicate is as tough as it gets, but we are up for the challenge. We are motivated to the core to realize our big vision: unlocking athlete potential as accelerators for startups’ growth. We have started exploring athlete investing in Europe, and now we are eager to learn how athletes in other continents are approaching their new career after sports.

Through Baller Syndicate, we are building a diverse community of like-minded athletes. In our community, athletes are diverse in their sport, country, or background. They are alike when it comes to their ambition, mentality, and work ethic. Hopefully, this interview will open the doors for us to get in touch with African athletes and build bridges between Europe and Africa.

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Press Release

Legacy Global Summit 2020: Positioning Africa for profitable partnerships

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The premiere edition of the Legacy Global Summit organised by Legacy Premier Foundation held on the 5th and 6th of November 2020. The virtual event hosted business leaders, investors, educators and distinguished men and women from different sectors and works of life as they shared practical insights on several topics.

The conference, through panel discussions and plenary sessions, focused on nurturing and strengthening long term business relationships between US and Africa, opening up channels of sustainable business opportunities, supporting growing African businesses, fostering mutual business interests, and building a formidable ecosystem of trade and investment, that will enhance ease of doing business between the United States and Africa.

Day 1, Thursday 5th Nov. 2020

The event kicked off with the opening remark by Dr. Remi Duyile, Founder of the Legacy Premier Foundation and the convener of the conference. She stated the importance of intergenerational collaboration and partnership and how the future of Africa must be preserved. She spoke about her faith in the future of Africa and highlighted the possibilities of greater outcomes as regards to trade and investment in Africa.

Dr. Remi Duyile 

Special remarks to the six continent participants was followed by John C. Wobensmith, Secretary of State of Maryland , USA

The opening remark was followed with a brief orientation of the virtual teleconferencing platform by Dr Wendy Brisley Executive Director of M3Linked , and a SUPER networking session by Dr. Richard Kaye from CEO space International.

Brian Castleberry, the Regional Manager – Middle East, Africa & India Office of International Investment and Trade moderated the first panel session titled “Doing Business In The UAE” which had business personalities from Dubai – Sheikha Abdulla AlNuaimi, Executive Director of Marketing and Sales Ajman Free Trade Zone UAE and Arshi Zaveri, CEO TrustwithTrade Group as panelists.

L-R: Skeiha Abdulla AlNuaimi, Arshi Zaveri and Brian Castleberry 

They highlighted the possibilities of doing business in the UAE and also mentioned that there are no barriers to foreign investments from diverse sectors. Sheikha Abdulla AlNuaimi pointed out that the creation of the free trade zone has become one of the biggest drivers for business growth in the UAE. In response to the question of gender inclusion in the business community of the UAE, Arshi Zaveri stated that the leadership of the UAE has ensured that women-owned businesses are supported and women are welcomed even in executive positions.

The second panel session ‘Access to capital’ was moderated by Jeannine Scott, the Founder and Principal of America to Africa Consulting, LLC (A2A). The panelists were: Alan Beard, Roshanda Johnson – Business Development Specialist US International Development Finance Corporation Brian Castleberry, Nicole Woods – Business Development Expert Export-Import Bank of the United States and Femi Akinrebiyo – Global Manager, Upstream manufacturing Agribusiness and services IFC

L-R: jeannine Scott, Alan Beard, Nicole Woods, Femi Akinrebiyo and Rashanda Johnson

The discussion was centered around the issues faced by SMEs as regards getting capital for their business or projects.The essence of capacity building for business owners was also discussed in order for businesses to measure up to the requirements of financing institutions.

One of the panelists, Alan Beard, from Interlinks spoke about how important it is for business owners to have high quality financial statements before seeking capital.

Femi Akinrebiyo, global manager IFC enjoined entrepreneurs to know where to go in order to get capital or funds. He mentioned that every financial Institution has specifics, as regards what kind of idea or project they invest in.

Nicole Woods, a business development expert spoke about the role relationships and partnerships play in giving entrepreneurs access to real opportunities. She advised business owners to have a good plan and strategy  before meeting with any investor or financial institution.

Rashanda Johnson from DFC stated the willingness of the dfc towards entrepreneurs to scale their business or project.

Jeannine Scott concluded by saying that the ability to be flexible and to move quickly is very important for business success.

The third panel, titled ‘Doing Business in Africa’ was moderated by the Chief Commercial Officer of Mixta Africa, Rolake Akinugbe-Filani. The panelists included: Dipo Adesina, Dr. Olawanle Akinboboye, Esther Dassanou, Hon. Idris Mohammad, and Gregory Simpkins.

The discussion centered on the importance of good government policies and how it affects the flow of business transactions. Each speaker shared their thoughts on the question asked – ‘Is Africa still a choice destination for doing business?’ 

Esther Dassanou highlighted the fact that Africa has the largest percentage of women entrepreneurs and business owners and she believes Africa is still a choice destination for doing business with opportunities, waiting to be explored.

Dipo Adesina, a serial entrepreneur envisaged the population strength of Africa (which is 1.2 billion people) as a pointer that Africa is still a choice destination for business. He also mentioned that entrepreneurs must continue to look at which continent is constantly growing in population so as to understand where to invest.

Dr. Akinboboye, a business leader in the tourism industry took a step by step approach to highlight the fact that Africa has a 30.2 million square kilometer area with a population of 1.2 billion people.He made his point clear that with all Africa has, Africa is still a choice destination for doing business.

Gregory Simpkins also shared insights on the goal of AGOA to increase Intra-Africa trade, and connect business people together. He mentioned that one of the benefits was the creation of scale.

In between the panelists were standalone global impact thought leaders and influencers such as Dr Arikana Chihombori-Quao , Max Sutherland and Delegate Darryl Barnes who spoke and moved people to action.

The “Public-private-partnership: A Fundamental Key To Developmental Growth” panel session engaged participants and co-speakers on the wide range of discussions, from international public-private partnerships to foreign investments in the African continent. Moderated by Shavon Smith, Principal, the SJS Law Firm, the session was an eye-opener to foreign partnerships and global business opportunities available for African business owners, as well as possible limitations. The panelist drove their points home by highlighting a few key factors influencing the Public-private-partnership ecosystem globally, amongst which are local and international policies, leadership, market accessibility, local talent and public perception.

L-R Dr. Arikana Chihombori-Quap, Max Sutherland, Darryl Barnes and Dr. Wendy Brisley

Special remarks were also made by the State Attorney for Prince George’s County, Aisha N. Braveboy, the U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 4th Congressional District, Congressman Anthony Brown and Honorable Darryl Barnes, the Representative of the 25th Legislative District in the Maryland House of Delegates.

Friday, 6th November 2020

The second day of the event kicked off with a presentation on ‘Sustainable Ecosystem for African businesses’ by Guest Speaker Otunba Bimbola Ashiru, former Commissioner of Commerce and Industry and Director of O’DUA Investment Company Limited

Otunba Bimbola Ashiru 

He highlighted the potentials of the African market and laid emphasis on the fact that Africa is recognized as the next business hub waiting to be harnessed. “A bright light shines on the African tech ecosystem” said Otunba Bimbola.

Dr Menna Demmesie

The event continued with a Guest session anchored by as Dr Menna Demessie who spoke on the topic “Leveraging Policy and Policymakers for International Trade Relations”. Dr Menna extensively impressed the need for business owners, particularly the locals to get accustomed to the policies and laws – local, state, federal and international – that would help facilitate ease of doing business.

Hon. Aisha Braveboy

Honorable Aisha Braveboy, earlier in the event, gave a special remark acknowledging the great work done by Dr Remi Duyile, the convener of the program. She expressed in joy in the vision of the Summit, wholeheartedly, and appreciated the Speakers and participants who availed themselves on that day. Honorable Aisha also anchored the graduation ceremony of the HERISE Global Internship program. 

The first panel for the day came up shortly after Dr Menna’s session. Tagged “Going Global: Understanding International Trade and Development,” the session featured Global thought leaders from various works of life namely; Tisa Clark, President, J.D. Clark Professional Services, L.L.C. (JD Clark); Don Williams, President and CEO of Princeton Healthcare International; Dr Kamaladevi Baskaran, Head of Industry Relations & Faculty, Department of Management & Commerce, Amity University, Dubai;  Denise Cortês-Keyser, Entrepreneur, Motivational speaker, Finance and Investments Adviser Founder, DCK GLOBAL. Dr Kavita Kapur, an Assistant Professor at the College of Business, Bowie State University moderated the session.

The panel discussions was deeply engaging, as conversations centered on cross-disciplinary collaborations and partnerships, exploring global talent exchange, international trade processes and attracting the right investments/investors.

Mrs Toyin Sanni

Mrs Toyin Sanni, CEO, Emerging Africa Capital spoke on the “Women Empowerment through Trade and Investment” She approached the topic keenly from her experience as a Financial Markets Expert and Gender Leader. Mrs Toyin, during her session, highlighted the importance of creating opportunities for women, as they are responsible to many grass root business establishments on the African continent. She went further to propose key solutions that could help promote gender empowerment and parity across the continent. Education, easy access to funding, and promotion of gender equality were some of the key solutions she mentioned, with the promotion of gender equality on the very top of that list. 

Afterwards, Denise Cortês-Keyser gave an expose on The African Union’s African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) uncovering key details on the scope of the agreement. She touched on historical data, the vision of the trade agreement which is to allow free access to commodities, goods, and services across the continent; and the current number of countries who have both signed and approved ratification of the AfCFTA Agreement – which currently stands at 30 countries, as at the time of her session.  Denise stated 2 major issues posing as bulwarks to the AFCFTA. Issues such as unified trade policies and markets, cultural gaps, and manufacturing pose a great challenge to the implementation of the agreement. She further suggested seven namely: trade finance, trade facilitation, and trade policy, trade related infrastructure, trade information, productive capacities, and a factor market integration.

Denise Cortês-Keyser 

Victory Oluwasegun, CIO of Jamborow and COO/Co-founder of SpringPort Technologies moderated the next panel session ‘Generational Bridge-Building for Emerging Leaders and Entrepreneurs’ with panel members: Josephine Agbeko, Dayo Israel and Lara Abiona. 

They addressed critical issues that stand as barriers between different generations. They highlighted the fact that all generations have something to offer and more would be achieved if each generation can leverage their strengths, and collaborate instead of compete.

In response to a question on the challenges of intergenerational gap, Josephine Agbeko described the younger generation as a set of people who will always ask “why” and sometimes such characteristics might be in contrast with the perception and attitude of the older generation and vice versa. She affirmed the importance of collaboration between generations. Lara Abiona also affirmed that the younger generation are willing to provide answers for their future. Victory Oluwasegun chimed in with the phrase ‘In the long run it’s not what we do that matters but why’.

Top (L-R): Victory Oluwasegun, Victory Oluwasegun, CIO of Jamborow and COO/Co-founder of SpringPort Technologies; Josephine Agbeko, Climate justice and Sustainable Business Development Professional ; Lara Abiona, Director of Partnerships and Advancement, Baobab Consulting; Dayo Israel, Permanent Board Member at Lagos State Universal Basic Education

The ‘Diplomatic Round table session’ followed immediately, anchored by Dr.  Lawrence Mcneil the Dean of Bowie University. The panel members were Lawrence Manzi, Amb. Pradeep K Kapur, and Kayode Alabi.

Amb. Kapur, while speaking on trade and investment stated the impact Africans in Diaspora can have on Africa if they decide to build and invest in Africa. He acknowledged the achievements of Africans in Diaspora in different sectors and suggested that it’s important that Africans in Diaspora begin to create a legacy in Africa as their heritage.

Also Mr. Lawrence Manzi highlighted 3 pillars responsible for the growth of Rwanda – Unity as a people, Accountability and thinking big. 

Mr. Kayode talked about the efforts made by the Kwara State Government in Nigeria as regards trade and investment in different sectors 

Top (L-R): Dr Lawrence Mcneil, Dean of School of business, Bowie State University; Ambassador Pradeep K Kapur, Ambassador of India to Chile and Cambodia; Lawrence Manzi, First Counselor in charge of Political Affairs at the Embassy of Rwanda; His Excellency Kayode Alabi, Deputy Governor, Kwara State, Nigeria

The last panel session was titled ‘Entertainment: Tool for Nation Building’. The session was moderated by Kemi Ajumobi with Rozina Negusei and Audi Maikori as panelists

During the session the successes and achievements of the entertainment industry in Africa and the global impact was highlighted.

Audu Maikori talked about how African content enjoys more streaming and downloads from international audiences.

Rozina Negusei also mentioned that African entertainment is now the best next thing after playing soccer drawing the attention of music lovers worldwide.

Top (L-R): Kemi Ajumobi, Associate Editor, Businessday Media Ltd.; Audu Maikori Founder, Chocolate City Group: Rozina Negusei, President and CEO Entreeg records Record label executive
Awardees

The two-day event ended with an Award session, launch of the ‘Legacy Colossus Coaching for women and also the ‘Legacy Global Network’ – a platform to connect global entrepreneurs and business leaders that will serve as an engine of growth for emerging leaders.

Dr. Remi Duyile, the Convener giving the closing remarks

The summit will ultimately impact business interactions between nations, creating a bridge for investors and entrepreneurs to meet and create innovative value. The 2021 edition is scheduled to hold in the UAE.

www.legacyglobalsummit.org

www.legacypremier.org

Info@legacypremier.org

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