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9 Inspiring Women in the Nigerian LegalTech Space

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Kelechi Achinonu, Founder Techlawyered and Technology Lawyer

In celebration of International Women’s Day, 2020, Techlawyered would like to share with you the stories of extraordinary women in Nigeria who are innovating in their various roles, while leveraging technology to improve the legal practice and access to justice.

Rahila Olu-Silas Ambassador, World Legal Summit (West Africa)

Biggest Success in LegalTech

Collaborating with Open Law Library Washington DC, a U.S.A based Not-for-Profit Organization to automate the process of Bill drafting, codification, and publication of laws in digital formats in Nigeria

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

Researching the legal framework that will enable the adoption of Machine-Consumable legislation in Nigeria. This will enable emerging technologies to consume our laws through APIs and process them without the human factor.

What motivates you to keep going?

The possibility of change in the way legal services is delivered in Nigeria

Funkola Odeleye , Co-founder and CEO at DIYLaw.ng

Biggest Success in LegalTech

I am not sure we have hit our biggest success yet but being able to simplify legal services and topics and making them attainable and understandable comes close

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

The problem that we are trying to solve is making legal services accessible and our biggest challenge is how to make it accessible for those without access to technology. It is an irony of sorts.

What motivates you to keep going?

The sheer number of jobs that are being created because people are able to launch their businesses through our platform keeps me going. Also, getting kind words and referrals from people who have used our platform is an affirmation that we are doing something right.

Also Read : Women in Tech: Interview With Anna Collard, Founder Popcorn Training – A KnowBe4 Company

Adejoke Are , Co-founder/Project Lead, The Flemer Project

Biggest Success in LegalTech

I run an organization – the Flemer Project – that helps indigent pretrial detainees conclude their matters in court as quickly as possible, by leveraging on the support of young volunteer lawyers who directly provide legal representation to these detainees.

Although we are never physically present in court to monitor the performance of our volunteer lawyers, incorporating technology into our solution has made monitoring and evaluating their work quite a seamless affair. Through this approach, we have been able to provide legal representation to almost 200 indigent pretrial detainees and to secure the release of 60 of them from prison.

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

I don’t have any technical experience or skill in building technology platforms and this has been a drag on the development of a comprehensive technology platform needed to manage our overall operations.

What motivates you to keep going?

The passion of our young volunteer lawyers who go over and beyond to give their best to people who can never repay them, and the fact that our solution literally changes people’s lives by helping them regain their freedom.

Oluwatosin Amusan , Product Development Lead, Mylaw.ng

Biggest Success in LegalTech

Delivering legal services to customers via technology, from the comfort of their couch. The fact that my team and I were able to develop products and show value enough to earn the trust of customers who end up drawing on the products on mylaw.ng and coming back for more.

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

Constantly answering the question “Is legal technology a viable sector in Nigeria”. Looking at it from a global perspective with 3 unicorns in legal tech this question does not surface in the international scene. However, In Nigeria, we have quite a number of legal tech startups who have to prove themselves 10 times harder, show double the traction required to prove that this is a viable sector.

What motivates you to keep going?

The refusal to settle for mediocrity. I make it a ritual to look back at works I have done in various facets of my life every six months, and without a doubt, I see the growth not just intellectually but in physical form. It is easy to get complacent with doing just what is required, but there is always room to improve and do better. No one changed the world by doing what just was required of them.

Faith Obafemi , Head of Strategy, Future-Proof Intelligence

Biggest Success in LegalTech

Establishing as a recognized expert in the blockchain space in less than 2 years. This has been a never-ending journey that has stretched me intellectually, financially, emotionally and otherwise. But, I have been better for it. I have met some of the most amazing persons on this journey. People who help broaden your horizon.

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

Breaking/building a tech foundation. In the early days, things were just mostly Greek to me. But, the more I kept at it, the familiar it became and the easier it was to understand.

What motivates you to keep going?

Money! Hahaha, I know most people would’ve been expecting something knight worthy like passion to help others, desire to impact, etc. Well, why all that is great, it still requires money. I am yet to see a broke person help another or have an impact on others.  So, yes, money motivates me to keep going. Because, with money as a tool, I can achieve other things that I hold dear.

Rhoda Obi-Adigwe, Founder Wemora

Biggest Success in LegalTech

Our greatest success was when Hill gave us an award and a grant for our legal software which aids in the writing of will and creation of trust online. This was very inspiring to us knowing that our efforts were being recognized.

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

Our biggest challenge to legal technology is cultural and traditional bias. People are still skeptical to include their personal and private details online making it difficult to prepare legal documents for them. This fear also arises from the fact that the country has no stringent data policy laws.

What motivates you to keep going?

The legal tech space is evolving and we are beginning to see most traditional things done online like the CAC providing platforms for business registration, so our motivation is to keep pressing knowing fully well that these changes and policies will soon affect our own part of legal IT.

Yinka Bada , Lead Product Manager, LawPavilion Business Solutions

Biggest Success in LegalTech

One of the things I can consider as part of my biggest success in legal technology is two-fold:

i. My involvement in conceptualizing and facilitating the development and continuous improvement of software solutions that solve challenges around Practice Management, Legal Research and Legal Drafting for lawyers and judges, hence improving their efficiency by making it easier for them to do more in less time than usual. I’ve been working with a team of bright minds to continuously improve the leading Electronic Law Reports platform; the only one with Legal Analytics, and most cited in courts by top lawyers, and judges of both the Court of Appeal and Supreme Court.

ii. Leading and mentoring at different times,  young and aspiring Product Managers and Software Engineers  to passionately seek to identify the pain points in our justice delivery system, and  proffer innovative solutions

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

What I can consider as a challenge for me in legal technology is the huge amount of time, efforts and resources it has taken over the years to build and communicate the value of legal-tech solutions to the conservative legal industry; the sweet thing, however, is that this same industry is now embracing technology fully, and even asking for more

What motivates you to keep going?

The joy of facilitating an accelerated (albeit gradual) access to justice in Nigeria-  the possibility of having the practice of law and ultimately, the dispensation of justice continually become technologically improved for more efficiency and effectiveness.

Nankunda Katangaza , Co-founder, African Law & Tech Network (ALT Network)

Biggest Success in LegalTech

I guess my biggest success in legal technology was in following my hunch that there was a need and interest on the part of African legal professionals in technology and what it could do for the legal sector and creating the ALT Network to kick-start that conversation on the continent. The ALT Network has grown to over 150 individual and business members over the past two years and has a thriving community and activities across the continent which I could not have predicted when we set up the platform!

Engaging with the fast-growing African tech community has brought incredible insight into the legal and regulatory needs of tech disruptors across all sectors. I am delighted that the Network has quickly grown into a valued pan-African interlocutor in the discussion between lawyers, technologists, and regulators to build effective, responsive and progressive frameworks for tech growth in Africa.

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

My biggest challenge is also one that can be described as a ‘first world problem’ in that it is the challenge of opportunity and time – so many opportunities, not enough time! In the short couple of years, it has been around, ALT has attracted a significant following and interest from across the African legal and tech sectors.

Law cuts across each and every area of personal, public and commercial life and as such, ALT and its membership have a role to play across the continent from influencing public policy to creating tools for delivering access to the law to all. Finding the time to explore and follow all the possibilities and requests alongside a full-time job does keep me up at night!

What motivates you to keep going?

I have to say that the energy and enthusiasm of the ALT members is more motivation than anyone could ask for! Each day brings a new member. Each week brings a new idea and opportunity in a different country from an existing member so there’s never a quiet moment.

But more than anything, the prospect of bringing together people and entities from across the continent who are all driven by the same thing – to create and build prosperity for all Africans through innovative tech use and creating an enabling legal environment for success. It has also been amazing to meet so many Africans working in different sectors and industries and to collaborate with some of them.

Our recent partnership with Africa Digital Heritage, for example, to explore the legal issues arising in tech and the preservation of African cultural heritage was eye-opening and inspirational. I look forward to ALT continuing to be at the heart of similar collaborations and conversations over the years.

Also Read: Women in Tech: Interview With Elaine Wang, Cloud and Software Solutions Director for Rectron

Odunoluwa Longe, Country Director, Acceleration (West Africa) at HiiL

Biggest Success in LegalTech

My greatest success is seeing the entrepreneurs succeed. Success here does not just entail in competitions but in the ecosystem as well.

What has been your biggest challenge in Legal Technology?

My biggest challenge has been finding businesses that are solving justice problems and are focused on doing the same. A lot of people do not realize that justice is beyond just legal tech, It should be more focused on people gaining access to services that actually help them solve their problems.

What motivates you to keep going?

I am motivated by the need to help entrepreneurs and see them succeed.

Please join Techlawyered to celebrate these Wonder Women of Legal Tech.

Article By: Kelechi Achinonu

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Banking / Insurance

Current Legal Issues Arising from Banking and Financing Arrangements

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In August 2020, Diagoe Plc’s Nigerian entity announced that it was struggling to refinance a $23 million debt and trim costs following a shortage of dollars in the local-foreign exchange market. While the lack of access to greenback (dollar) remains a growing concern for borrowers in Africa, the downturn in the revenue and profits as a result of COVID-19 has recently become a more prevalent cause for the inability of many borrowers to fulfill their contractual obligations.

The disruption of supply chains, compulsory quarantine, and social distancing regulations are a few examples of the effect of COVID-19 which in turn have materially caused economic instability and affected the ability of borrowers to meet their financial obligations. There is therefore a need for lenders and borrowers to critically consider the implications of the current economy on their financial obligations.

This article highlights some key implications the current financial terrain may have on borrowers’ businesses and their ability to comply with their contractual obligations. The article further sets out recommendations for lenders and borrowers who are faced with the task of funding and repaying loans under respective financing arrangements. While there are numerous impacts of the resultant effect of COVID-19 on covenants in finance documents, this article highlights only a few of such key legal consequences on financial obligations.

Financial Conditions and their Implication on Covenants in Finance Documents

Generally, financial covenants in a loan agreement are undertakings given by the borrower to test the performance of the business servicing the loan and to help the lender ensure that the risk attached to the loan does not unexpectedly deteriorate prior to maturity.  These performance covenants may cover the borrower’s business both back or forward to assess whether the business is showing any signs of distress that could potentially affect its financial obligations under the finance documents.

Also Read: Helios Investment Partners Backed Africa Specialty Risk Group Launches

However, as a result of the steps taken to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, many businesses have seen a severe and abrupt drop in income which has affected the ability of businesses to meet some performance covenants.Where these covenants have been breached as a result of the pandemic, the lenders may declare a default under loan documents and demand early payments of loan which acts as a drawstop, such that the borrowers will not have access to their facilities. A drawstop event means a breach by the borrower of a financial covenant which gives the lender the right to refuse to make further loan advances under a facility agreement.

In light of the foregoing difficulties that both lenders and borrowers may face in these uncertain times, the following paragraph sets out practical solutions that may be explored by the parties. 

Legal Considerations for Borrowers and Lenders

With the current unpredictability of the financial markets, it is important that borrowers and lenders conduct a critical review of their current loan documents to verify the implications of COVID-19 on their rights and obligations. Most importantly, borrowers have to fully disclose to their lenders the current situation of their businesses, highlighting any potential breach before it happens helps to build trust and to enable the lenders to have a clear picture when deciding if they will be willing to adjust financial obligations in line with the current realities of the economy and take into consideration some practical solutions set out below.

First, parties may agree to re-negotiate and subsequently amend their financial covenants, taking into consideration the impact of COVID-19 on the borrower’s ability to comply with their financial covenants. For instance, certain definitions in the finance documents may no longer reflect the current realities of the borrower’s business, such as EBITDA which is used as a metric for thelast four fiscal quarter periods of earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization to measure the company’s financial performance.

Thus, where the EBITDA has been affected as a result of the pandemic an amendment to its substance will be an appropriate step in order to reflect the current financial condition of the borrower. Other re-negotiation may be in relation to compliance with certain conditions provided under the finance documents.For example, a facility agreement may include provisions requiring the borrower to fulfil certain further conditions precedent before it can access additional funding under the relevant facility.

It usually includes confirmation that:

(i) no Event of Default or a potential Event of Default has occurred and is continuing; and

(ii) the repeating representations are true in all material
respects, in each case, as at the date of the utilisation request and the proposed utilisation date.

In such instances, parties may either amend the provisions or the borrower may request that the lender grant waivers in the event that such conditions will not be fulfilled.

Another consideration that the borrower may explore (subject to the fulfillment of any available conditions or if waivers are granted by the lender) is utilizing any undrawn commitment under its existing facilities. Although, it has been highlighted above that material breaches of covenants may give right to the lender torefuse to provide additional funding, it may be in the interest of lenders to provide same. This is because additional funding may positively impact the borrower’s business and in turn improve the lender’s chances of full debt recovery.

Finally, parties may consider undertaking a full restructuring of the financing by re-negotiating substantial terms and entering into restructured facility documentation which may capture relaxation of financial covenants, obtaining a moratorium on interest payment obligations, all necessary requirements, amendments, waivers, and consents required by the borrower. Essentially, the restructured facility documentation is drafted on much better terms that reflect the current financial conditions and commercial needs of the borrower.

Conclusion

The global COVID-19 pandemic has no doubt placed a strain on the ability of some businesses to service their debts under finance documents. While many governments especially in developed countries have granted some aids, this may not be enough especially for companies in certain industries that have been seriously hit by the pandemic. The situation is even worse in undeveloped markets where there is little or no support from government. Thus, it is unavoidable that re-negotiation and restructuring are considerations that will likely be put forward by borrowers to avoid triggering defaults under their finance document during these unprecedented times.

It is advisable that lenders on the other hand, are more flexible with their approach with their borrowers and are willing to work around re-negotiating the financial covenants with the borrowers given the current uncertainties arising in the economy.

Written By: Bukola Adelusi recently completed her LL.M in corporate law at Western University, Ontario. Prior to her LL.M, she practiced with a top-tier law firm in Nigeria, where she specialized in banking and finance, M & A and private equity.

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Legal Business

How Artificial Intelligence Is Transforming the Legal Profession

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LegalTech Image (Source: Medium)

The legal sector has a general reputation for being conservative when it comes to technology. Not anymore. The landscape is rapidly changing. Digital legal tools have gone beyond the days of Westlaw and LexisNexis, the two companies that pioneered online legal research. Artificial intelligence is revolutionizing how attorneys practice law. Keep reading to understand what artificial intelligence is and how it’s transforming the legal profession.

AI Partners with Lawyers

Artificial intelligence (AI) is a term used for a computer-based algorithm that can analyze, strategize, and draw conclusions to complete tasks typically performed by humans. Although AI is new, people have dreamed of harnessing the capability of computers to assist in legal tasks for hundreds of years. In the late 1600s, the German attorney G.W. Leibniz theorized that machines would someday use a binary logic system to calculate numbers, and he envisioned a partnership between artificial intelligence and lawyers. Despite never seeing anything resembling a computer, he accurately described the benefits that AI now provides to the legal profession: “It is unworthy of excellent men to lose hours like slaves in the labor of calculation which could safely be relegated to anyone else if machines were used.”

AI-based software allows law firms to automate lower-level tasks, freeing time for attorneys to focus on complex analysis and client interaction. AI greatly enhances an attorney’s ability to research, advise, and serve their clients. Some large firms already use AI-based tools to enhance their practices. According to the 2018 Technology Survey by the International Legal Technology Association100 percent of law firms with 700 or more lawyers use AI tools or are pursuing AI projects. Firms, particularly larger businesses, that don’t adapt to changing technology, will soon struggle to compete.

Eventually, artificial intelligence will automate even more aspects of legal practice. According to a Deloitte Insight report, AI may automate more than 100,000 supportive roles in the legal sector within the next two decades. However, AI won’t spell the end of non-attorney legal careers. Instead, it will undoubtedly create new career paths, with boundless opportunities in AI and machine learning.

Infographic: Technology is a Job Creator

AI will revolutionize the following areas of the law.

LItigation Document Review

One thing all attorneys can agree on is that law practice involves a lot of paperwork. Even a simple case can involve an impressive number of documents, communications, and reports. Attorneys have a duty to review all the discovery materials associated with a case. If an attorney misses key terms or changes, it can be disastrous and even rise to the level of malpractice. Fortunately, AI streamlines eDiscovery technology, including document review.

AI eDiscovery algorithms work by learning how a firm reviews documents and sorting out relevant terms, topics, and other criteria. Once AI software knows what to look for, it can suggest important documents and areas of interest within the content. AI solves two persistent problems with discovery: it typically takes too long, and it’s expensive.

To illustrate the benefits of AI for document review, imagine that in-house counsel for Company A receives a few thousand documents relating to pending litigation regarding an order of botched goods. Company A’s attorney specifies terms of interest along with relevant documents for the company’s AI to review. The AI scans through thousands of records within seconds and provides the attorney with the necessary information to build a case. With the help of AI, Company A drastically lowers legal costs and quickly drafts a claim to recoup damages and mitigate further losses.

Attorneys have used text retrieval for legal research for decades. Companies such as Westlaw and LexisNexis provided foundational online legal research tools. AI enhances these traditional search methods.

Searching for applicable case law is tedious. General search terms can yield thousands of case results, proving useless to a busy attorney. AI improves searches because it learns what an attorney needs. The more data and information an attorney provides to narrow the scope, the more the AI tailors the information. Instead of 1,000 possible cases that could contain applicable precedent, the AI may provide the attorney with a handful of the most relevant cases. Plus, AI can continue the search even after the initial inquiry. It’s similar to having a legal assistant researching for a client day and night.

For example, imagine Company A sues a manufacturer for failure to deliver conforming goods. Attorneys for Company A provide their AI with important terms and applicable facts and request a list of relevant case law. Not only does the AI deliver past cases on the subject, but it automatically provides updates and further research as it’s published. This intuitive retrieval process is the cornerstone of how AI transforms legal research.

Infographic: How AI Helps Attorneys Build Better Cases

Due Diligence

Artificial intelligence serves as an invaluable tool for attorneys to manage their workloads and protect the best interests of clients by being able to review more documents in less time, and with greater accuracy.

Due diligence can vary widely in its breadth and depth. Generally speaking, it’s a time-consuming process of gathering documents, relevant data, communications, and other vital information. Once assembled, attorneys must painstakingly review each document and search for language in those documents that effectively prohibit a transaction from proceeding forward, or that state that certain consents are required, among other things. Attorneys can use or customize AI to search provided documentation and information, extract key points, and organize everything for thorough review. They can cut contract review time by up to 60 percent by using AI, according to research by Kira Systems.

Contract management

For attorneys who regularly deal with large volumes of contracts, contract management is a must. Artificial intelligence provides a fast and efficient method to organize, track, and negotiate contracts. AI collects data over time to help attorneys draw conclusions, create future contract strategies, and discover new insights within the contract terms. AI software provides attorneys with more confidence in contract negotiations and leads to better outcomes for clients.

For example, imagine an attorney for Company A would like to request a change to the current commission rate during the next contract renewal with Company B. The attorney provides the AI software with access to past contracts associated with Company B. The AI then provides an accurate prediction of whether Company B will approve the requested change.

AI can also help attorneys predict the amount of time it will take a counterparty to approve a contract. The timing of contract approval can significantly impact a businesses’ overall strategy. AI can provide unprecedented accurate estimations from contract creation to close.

For example, imagine Company A needs to decide whether to ask for a modification of a clause in a contract with a manufacturer. Company A’s attorney uses AI to analyze the change and provide Company A with a time estimate for approval due to the added request. The AI assigns cost values to extensions of time to allow Company A to weigh financial penalties against further negotiations. AI provides Company A with sophisticated insights to enable their attorneys and managers to assess whether additional requests would be worth the estimated delay.

Also Read: Why Virtual Staffing is Important for Business Growth

Litigation prediction

Some of the most common questions clients ask attorneys are, “Do you think I would win this case if it went to trial?” and “Should we settle? How much is reasonable?” Attorneys draw conclusions based on their years of experience in litigation and their knowledge about the local judges and opposing counsel.

Artificial intelligence takes prediction to the next level. AI can analyze similar cases with similar facts and provide a statistical analysis to predict litigation outcomes accurately. This tool allows attorneys to confidently advise clients on how and if to move forward with litigation.

For example, imagine Company A is contemplating whether to settle in mediation regarding a suit against Company B. In-house counsel for Company A uses AI legal software to weigh their options. The attorney discovers that with the current facts, Company A has approximately a 55 percent chance of winning at trial. Because of the risk of a negative impact on public relations and the small chances for a win at trial, Company A accepts a settlement, which saves their business tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees.

But is AI accurate with litigation outcome prediction? A London law firm used the data of more than 600 cases over a year to predict the viability of several personal injury cases. And artificial intelligence beats human experts in predicting the outcomes of Supreme Court cases.

Infographic: What Attorneys Can Do With More Time

Conclusion

Artificial intelligence is transforming the legal profession and the practice of law. Some people fear it will eventually replace attorneys. But AI legal software produces the opposite effect. It has the potential to help lawyers fall in love with their careers all over again while saving time and money in the process.

By automating repetitive tasks, lawyers can focus on higher-thinking and more complex operations of their practice. Attorneys may be able to say goodbye to long hours spent reviewing documents. They can spend more time with clients and devote more energy to formulating arguments and strategic planning. For the legal profession, the implementation of AI is a victory for everyone involved.

Written by: Rachel Vanni

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Legal Business

The Business of Law and the Future of Law: A Convergence

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Lawyers are steeped in precedent. They love reusing past precedents, and this has extended to the practice of Law. Lawyers and law firms love the brick-and-mortar approach where exclusivity of technical knowledge, reliance on long experience and conservativeness of the profession is the bane and the leading mantra.

But things are changing. Two schools of thought are emerging: the ultra conservative older generation (perhaps?) of lawyers and the hungrier, savvier generation of lawyers who are willing to throw exclusivity of technical knowledge and the ultra conservativeness of the profession out of the proverbial window to be dashed to figurative pieces on the cobblestones.

Lawyers and law firms are descending into the battleground of marketing, strategy and market share equity gains over other firms, all of these things that were previously almost never talked about or whispered about in shocked whispers. And with good reason, too. Lawyers of the past saw the legal profession as just that: “the legal profession”. A new term has emerged: “the legal services industry”. I am an ardent supporter of the latter hypothesis.

Profession or Business?

The erstwhile boundaries between the legal services industry and other professional services has become a blur because of the speed and dynamism of business operations, the interdisciplinary nature and heft of professional services, and the incursion of alternative legal services providers-the ALSPs-into the core legal profession. We have the Big Four-the holy alliance of the leading Four professional services firms Deloitte, EY, PwC and KPMG-casting their sights and nets to the legal services industry as well. This goes to show that it is no longer business as usual.

“All this is emblematic of a changing legal industry- the by-product of the complexity and speed of business, shifting consumer needs, new skill-sets and elevated expectations of providers, and new buy dynamics. Law is morphing from a lawyer-centric guild to a customer-centric marketplace”, writes Mark A. Cohen, a law business analyst in a Forbes article.

 Mr. Cohen couldn’t be more right. If the dynamics of law practice has shifted from lawyers to the consumers, with the attendant result that legal services consumers now have an array of choices of legal services providers- smaller law firm boutiques, alternative legal services providers, or even managed services providers- to meet their legal needs at their price points. This effectively means that Law has morphed from a profession strictu sensu to a Business.

Lawyers can knock themselves upside the head with figurative batons, law school curriculum designers can huff at this thought, but it does not change that shifting dynamic which keeps shifting: Law is a Business. The sooner lawyers get themselves married to this new fact, the better.

Static Law or Interdisciplinary Law?

As earlier pointed out, lawyers are steeped in precedents and are literally averse to change mechanisms. However, with the swiftly changing gears of the business world, lawyers now more than ever, need to become thriving chameleons, changing as the business world around them changes. The dynamics of this active change requires leading in law through the deeper understanding of the larger business stratum.

To illustrate, banks are no longer just banks; they are now technological companies that provide a suit of agile services including but not limited to financial services. Oil and gas firms are no longer plain oil & gas outfits but “Energy firms” so they can reflect the shifting dynamics of business and pivot from one end of the business spectrum to another if need be, at breathtaking speeds.

To further illustrate, consulting firms are no longer just plain business consulting firms but are now “full-service professional service firms”, one-stop shops for large suits of professional service work covering the entire business operations of clients, from process improvement to change management, employee engagement advisory, to tech adoption and digital transformation . . . literally anything that will help them solve their clients’ business problems and bring about active change without the need for these clients to look elsewhere for any of the myriad services they need.

For law firms, how about becoming “consultants” instead of just plain lawyers? In the former role, a lawyer takes an all-encompassing pivot into the client’s operations. Little wonder lawyers are taking courses in Tech, Strategy, Management, Business, Enterprise Risk Management, all in a bid to become “insider” assets to clients and provide the best services they can render. Consulting firms caught on long ago. The leading professional services firms have bright lawyers in their employ and these lawyers are pivoting into Tax, Business Analysis, et cetera.

“We are building capabilities to deliver seamlessly across borders as a truly global legal service provider. The innovative, technology enabled and integrated nature of our services will disrupt the legal market as a whole,” Piet Hein Meeter, Deloitte Global Leader points out.

Perhaps the consulting firms are getting the idea right about interdisciplinary services more than law firms. They seem to have a better grasp of the larger spectrum of professional services needed to better serve clients while lawyers- in many cases- restrict themselves to just the “reactive” type of services they provide rather than the “proactive” type of services needed to aggressively manage functions.

Branded Focus?

What do lawyers want? What do law firms want? How do lawyers feel they can best meet client needs? The legal services itself is in constant disruption. Law firms are consolidating their forces to present stronger focal alignments when bidding for top client work (Aelex, Primera Africa Legal, TNP with its acquisition of Adebiyi Tax & Legal comes to mind). Some legal commentators are suggesting a relaxation of the Rules of practice for legal practice so as to enable “multidisciplinary participation” in legal work.

Conclusion

It doesn’t matter whether or not lawyers see the profession as a business or as a profession in the strictest sense of the word, but it bears noting that the legal services industry will keep changing. The Big Four are here, and they are offering what core legal services providers cannot guarantee: one stop shopping for professional services, including litigation support, mergers and legal advisory.

The breakneck speed of technological innovations has kept on propelling a forward push to tech adoption and alignment with professional services. As a profession, we have to move with the flow, or be overtaken and swept away. Law is a business and the future of the profession is hinged on a rethink of the practice models we are adopting.

Also Read: Erica Tavares: Passionate About A Greener, Better Future

Author: Kingsley Ugochukwu Ani is the head of digital media at Kabbiz, a law business development and law firm business analytics publication.

First published Kabbiz

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