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The African Union Appoints Amref Health Africa Global CEO to Board of Africa Centre’s for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC)

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NAIROBI, 8 August 2019: Amref Health Africa Global CEO and Co-Chair of UHC 2030 steering committee, Dr Githinji Gitahi has been appointed as a member of the Governing Board of the Africa Centre’s for Disease Control and prevention (Africa CDC).

Dr Gitahi will join the Governing Board of the Africa CDC pursuant to article 10 of the statute of the Africa CDC. Dr Gitahi was appointed by the Commissioner for Social Affairs, Her Excellency Mrs. Aminra Elfadil of the African Union Commission.

The Africa CDC supports all African countries to improve surveillance, emergency response, and prevention of infectious diseases. This includes addressing outbreaks, man-made and natural disasters and public health events of regional and international concern. It further seeks to build the capacity to reduce disease burden on the continent.

“I would like to extend my gratitude to the African Union and specifically to H.E Mrs Elfadil for this appointment. I am honoured to be nominated to this position that is geared towards strengthening and transforming the health in Africa. I look forward to sharing my expertise and skills as we work towards achieving Universal Health Coverage and achieving health security in Africa,” said Dr Gitahi.

The Africa CDC is also a specialized technical institution of the African Union that serves as a platform for Member States to share knowledge, exchange lessons learnt and build capacity.

Also Read Interview: African Energy Chamber Executive Chairman, NJ Ayuk on Transforming Africa’s Energy Sector

This appointment comes after his nomination as the co-chair of the UHC2030 Steering Committee in December 2017. UHC2030 is a World Bank and World Health Organization (WHO) forum for achievement of universal health coverage (UHC) by 2030 and has membership across countries, private sector and civil society organisations.

About Amref Health Africa

Amref Health Africa, headquartered in Kenya, is the largest Africa based international non-governmental organisation (NGO) currently running programs in over 35 countries in Africa with lessons learnt over 60 years of engagement with governments, communities and partners to increase sustainable health access in Africa. Amref Health Africa also incorporates programme development, fundraising, partnership, advocacy, monitoring and evaluation, and has offices in Europe and North America as well as subsidiaries; Amref Flying Doctors, Amref Enterprises and the Amref International University.

Credit: Amref Health Africa

Health

Providing Affordable Healthcare in Nigeria Should Be Everyone’s Business

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Adaku Efuribe

“It is my greatest desire that we improve the healthcare system in Nigeria and provide affordable healthcare for local communities at the grassroots so that people can have access to the care they need, when they need it, in ways that are user-friendly” –  Adaku Efuribe

The 74th UN General Assembly took place in New York last September; high level meetings were held and Universal Health Coverage (UHC) was a hot topic for the week. As expected, Nigeria had a delegation of Government representatives, NGO’s and individual advocates who are working towards achieving SDG3 and UHC in attendance. So how do we implement new policies and what are the key drivers to providing UHC for all in Nigeria?

As an advocate for UHC/SDGs, I have been lending my voice over the years calling the Nigerian Government to action towards implementing UN SDGs agenda and achieving UHC.I have studied and participated in primary healthcare provision in developed economies and can say for sure healthcare provision is very expensive, but I believe we can up our game towards providing primary health care for everyone at the point of need.

Some developed economies have used the tax system to ensure their national health service does not run out of funds, a percentage of all earnings is taxed and put aside in a ‘pot’ to supplement the health budget. From a lay man’s point of view, just like the banking system, we all bank our money at different times and we withdraw money at different times, so for a contributory  healthcare system, everyone will not fall sick at the same time, some will experience life threatening sickness at some point in their life, some would have long term conditions like CVDs, Diabetes, etc., while others would only go through emergencies or minor ailments/major diseases.

In Nigeria for instance, we have a few HMO schemes covering the organised private and public sector. The ‘common man’ on the street does not have any sort of health insurance whatsoever, which leaves them at the mercy of chance. In an unfortunate event of serious illness like cancer or organ failure, they find themselves in a situation where they cannot pay for medical services hence resorting to luck to stay alive. A lot of unavoidable deaths have occurred due to lack of funds to pay for medical treatment.

The public primary care providers are underfunded and the issue of corruption has eaten deep into the fabric of the healthcare system where funds allocated for medical equipment’s, pharmaceuticals etc. are diverted for personal use.

What plans does the present Government in Nigeria have to provide Universal Health Coverage and in so doing, contribute to the economic growth of the Country?

Sustainability can be defined as meeting the needs of today without compromising the needs of tomorrow.

‘As articulated in SDG 3, health is crucial for sustainable human development, both as an inalienable human right and an essential contributor to the economic growth of society. Health contributes to national development through productive employment, reduced expenditure on illness care and greater social cohesion.

We believe that universal health coverage (UHC), delivered through an adequately-resourced and well-governed health system, will be capable of addressing these and other health challenges. Universal health coverage must ensure equitable access to affordable, accountable, appropriate health services of assured quality to all people.

These must include promotive, preventive, curative, palliative and rehabilitative services. UHC must be supported by policies and services addressing the wider social and environmental determinants of health for individuals and populations’. Sustainable Developments solutions network

Key words for providing health systems that works!

  • Well Governed Systems- Are there systems and policies in place that can be retained and continued
  • Promotive- Do we have health promotion strategies in place to promote good health and wellbeing
  • Preventative- Are we taking preventative measures seriously, screening, vaccination, reducing CVD risk through lifestyle management?
  • Curative- When we fall ill or in times of emergency, do we have access to affordable healthcare, or does sickness lead to poverty?
  • Palliative and rehabilitative services- For terminally ill patients, do we have plans for social prescribing and support? For people engaged in substance misuse, do we have plans for treatment, rehabilitation and integration back into the society

WHO uses 16 essential health services in 4 categories as indicators of the level and equity of coverage in countries: Where does Nigeria rank in the indicators?

Reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health:

  • Family planning
  • Antenatal and delivery care
  • Full child immunization
  • Health-seeking behaviour for pneumonia

Infectious diseases:

  • Tuberculosis treatment
  • HIV antiretroviral treatment
  • Hepatitis treatment
  • Use of insecticide-treated bed nets for malaria prevention
  • Adequate sanitation.

Noncommunicable diseases:

  • Prevention and treatment of raised blood pressure
  • Prevention and treatment of raised blood glucose
  • Cervical cancer screening
  • Tobacco (non-)smoking.

Service capacity and access:

  • Basic hospital access
  • Health worker density
  • Access to essential medicines
  • Health security: compliance with the International Health Regulations.

Also Read: Meet Mariatheresa S. Kadushi, Founder of M-afya, A Mobile App Providing Health Information In Native Languages In Africa

The Nigerian Government can do more to improve health outcomes and tackle poverty, by increasing coverage of health services, and by reducing the impoverishment associated with payment for health services. We can subsidise the payment for health services and provide emergency health care at the point of need by ensuring we are constantly reviewing our health policies and implementing proven international strategies. The Health budget does not in any way reflect the health needs of Nigerians, this needs to be reviewed.

As Individuals, if we take health promotion seriously, and change our lifestyle habits, then we can make changes that would reduce the cost of health as well.

Adaku Efuribe is an SDGs/UHC Advocate & Clinical Pharmacist with expertise in medicines management, integrated healthcare and health promotion.

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GE Healthcare Launches Versana Ultrasound Machines to Drive Access to Affordable and Quality Healthcare in Uganda

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GE Healthcare team displaying the Versana Premier and Versana Essential Ultrasound machines during the Uganda Society for Advancement of Radiology and Imaging Conference (USOFARI).

This innovative system is well suited for general practice clinics, physical check-up centers, community health clinics, and other facilities offering basic medical care

KAMPALA, Uganda, November 11, 2019- GE Healthcare has announced the launch of Versana Premier and Versana Essential for the first time in Uganda. The launch was announced during the Uganda Society for Advancement of Radiology and Imaging Conference (USOFARI).

Versana Premier is a world-class ultrasound designed for peace of mind, easy to use and easy to own. The Versana Premier ultrasound system can help deliver high-quality, personalized care, patient after patient, day after busy day. This innovative system is well suited for general practice clinics, physical check-up centers, community health clinics, and other facilities offering basic medical care. It also comes with local product and clinical training to help healthcare professionals gain comfort and proficiency with the system to enhance patient care.

Versana Essential is a complete ultrasound solution that healthcare professionals can learn to use quickly and productively. It enables confident clinical decision making for quick referrals and immediate clinical correlation to help scan a wide range of patients. The machine is designed with the growing medical center in mind, to provide the clinical capability and support they want without compromising the quality, reliability, and affordability needed.

Both Versana Premier and Versana Essential are part of the Versana ultrasound family, which comprises of solutions that help to empower care without compromise, balancing capability, affordability, and reliability. These innovative systems found within the GE Healthcare Primary Care Ultrasound Segment are well suited for general practice clinics, physical check-up centers, community health clinics, and other facilities offering basic medical care.

“We are excited to participate in this year’s USOFARI conference together with other private and public partners in an effort to continue providing the latest imaging solutions to enhance early detection of diseases and ultimately the most appropriate treatment for patients,” said Andrew Waititu, General Manager, GE Healthcare East Africa. “The launch of Versana Premier and Versana Essential is a testament of our continuous investment in innovations that help to drive access to affordable and quality healthcare for all across Uganda.”

Also Read Meet Mariatheresa S. Kadushi, Founder of M-afya, A Mobile App Providing Health Information In Native Languages In Africa

Universal Health Coverage (UHC) is part of the United Nations sustainable development goals, to ensure that every person, everywhere, should have access to quality healthcare. As part of its vision 2040 and the health sector development plan, Uganda seeks to accelerate movement towards UHC with among others, essential health and related services needed for promotion of a healthy and productive life. 

GE Healthcare

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Understanding Nutrition History For A Healthier Life

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Pounded yam with vegetable soup (Image: Simplinatural)

“We are less healthy today than our ancestors. By disregarding traditions, we’ve predisposed ourselves to genetic damage.” Catherine Shanahan M.D author of Deep Nutrition.

It’s the 21st century and the machines, computers, social media and tech drivers are here. Giant strides in medical science, engineering, technology has made life better and easier for us. We were supposed to be a very healthy and wealthy generation but instead we started to get sicker and unhealthier. Over the last 50 years cardiovascular related health issues is the number one killer of men and women worldwide according to a WHO report.

Our diets changed and so did our bodies and health. We deciphered so many hypotheses of what could be the problem. We thought it was inadequate exercise, so we exercised more but nothing changed. Whenever we thought we knew the answer to what was happening to our health decline, we realised we were right back where we started from. We continued to grapple with modern diseases medical science seems unable to mitigate.

What does history have to do with our health?

The year is 1901 and my maternal Grandmother is preparing dinner of Amala and ewedu soup (Yam flour and a vegetable). She prepares the dinner just before sun down and gives her large family to eat. Three times in a week, she prepares the same type of meal. However, unknown to my grandmother was the fact that the fermentation process during yam flour processing had converted the starch present in the yam into more complex nutrients like minerals and vitamins by the help of a bacteria called lactobacilli.

Fermentation converts starch(sugar) to lactic acid leaving by-products like beneficial minerals, vitamins that the gut uses to produce important neurotransmitters like serotonin. Serotonin is responsible for regulating sleep, appetite, moods and pain inhibition in the brain but its production is influenced by the billions of friendly bacteria like lactobacilli in the gut. She knows nothing about the science behind what she prepares for her family but from observation over time along with thousands of other women, she knows that a good meal of amala was easily digestible, filling and kept everyone happy.

It’s the 21st century and we no longer sprout our grains for their beneficial vitamins and minerals but cart them off for processing and our diet high in refined sugar and processed oils have now started to harm our brain. Our cells are weak from oxidative stress and inflammation but we continue to eat these modern diets.

We see a spike in suicide rates and depression amongst young people all over the world with no end in sight. Maybe this is the right time to begin to study nutrition history. What worked in the past? What did our ancestors eat that made them strong and healthy? More evidence in nutritional psychiatry are starting to show a connection between what we eat and how we feel.

A critical look into traditional African diets show a rich healthy source of nutrition based on what is now known as the four pillars of the human diet according to Catherine Shanahan author of best-selling book, Deep Nutrition. What is fascinating is how African dishes combine every aspect of the four pillars of the human nutrition making it one of the most nutritious and earlier diet in the world.

Fermented food: delicacies like kunu (fermented millet drink) masa (fermented rice fried in oil) beautifully incorporate food techniques like fermentation ensuring adequate gut health and microbial balance in the body.

Organ meat: Organ meat known to contain vital vitamins are extensively used in preparing soups broth popularly known as pepper soup in southern Nigeria. It is also eaten with other delicious dishes.

Meat on the bone: dishes with meat containing bones are known to provide collagen and body building nutrient and a Nigerian dish that incorporates this is miyankuka dish(a favourite) from northern Nigeria.

Sprouted foods: sprouting known to convert carbohydrate in grains to complex nutrients like vitamins and mineral was on e of the ways our ancestors could successfully grind their grains to powdery usable forms. A traditional African dish that incorporate the technique is Eyin drink from the north central part of Nigeria.

Healthy nutritious diet is delicious, natural and better. Our generation advanced in technology, science and knowledge but needs to pay attention to a vital part of history- our nutritional history. History tell us what’s worked in the past and what’s not working now. It’s time we change the trend once again and return to our roots.

Also Read: How Working Mothers Can Find A Life-Career Balance

Author

Deborah Ogwuche is the creative director and founder of Food Channel Africa, a 24-hour television channel dedicated to showcasing African cuisines. She is a published author, a food blogger and a healthy food advocate.

Email: [email protected]

 

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